DreamBliss

Could someone explain the Buddhist belief system to me?

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Another perspective: Buddhist thought can take you down many roads, but in the end, all roads lead back to dukkha -- suffering -- and its reduction.

 

With Christianity, all roads lead back to God. If you begin asking "why?" -- as in "Why pay attention to the Ten Commandments? Why refrain from killing others? and so on -- you can reduce the argument to "Because God wants it that way." And quite often, that's where you end up in some Christian dialogues -- e.g., "The Bible says it (i.e., God wants it), I believe it, and that's the end of it." The "reason," or the impetus for action is to please God. On this count, asking "What would God want me to do?" and perhaps referring to the Bible to decipher what He might want you to do, makes sense. But this is not so in Buddhism. There is no God-head, and there is no mandate to please Buddha. Instead, the Buddhist project is to reduce suffering (note: there is much to say about the translation of Dukkha as 'suffering' but lets avoid that issue here).

 

One might ask of the Buddhist project, "Why suffering?" What is so special about that?

 

Of course no one wants to suffer, but there are lots of things no one wants to experience. So why not go for "To please the Buddha" for "To gain enlightenment," or "To exit the wheel of life and death," or whatever...Why hit specifically on the reduction of suffering?

 

Well... there is no reason. The reduction of suffering as the hub around which the Buddhist project revolves is fundamentally arbitrary. But "arbitrary" here does not indication "better" or "worse," it simply re-states a core Buddhist understanding of the delusional arbitrariness of all things -- i.e., that there is no better or worse in any ultimate sense, and any attempt to establish them as such is delusional (note that there is a "better" and a "worse" in Christianity, and it boils down to that which God wants. Doing what God wants is "better," and not doing it is "worse"). With Buddhism, the reduction of suffering might be a highly favorable "better" (in a limited sense) thing to focus on in the order of world delusions, but carries no ultimate voracity as might the notion of making God happy.

 

 

M

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Michael, you have to do a lot more suffering before you are ready to begin understanding.

 

But then, you could just be a Daoist and you wont have to suffer unless that is something that moves you.

 

 

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LOL. Very nice. I don't know much about Daoist thought, so I can't comment there.:)

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someone once said    " don't try to be a Buddhist - just be the Buddha "

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Each of us has that potential to be a Buddha, the supreme state of Enlightenment that frees oneself from the bondage of samsara and kamma. As we travel the path of emancipation, those who are accepting the teachings of the Buddha and earnestly practised as such, are collectively known to be Buddhists, a 'modern term' or if you like to be quaint, 'the follower of Buddha Sakyamuni'. 

 

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That one can be free of the myopia (karma)

 

That one can be free of the grasping that holds us to the myopia (karma)

 

that we are not the myopia (karma)

 

as we step into the all encompassing light that encompasses all and nothing - we become and are ever becoming all and everything

 

the multicolored glasses that held us mesmerized in trance fields of illusion (karma) can be no more - and the sleep of our entrainment (karma) and all identity (karma) burns away in the light of abiding in Divine Essence.

 

Believe nothing for everything is already yours - all of time takes not one second - you cannot go to or arrive where you are not already. Other has never existed - a god that is not you is blasphemy - a false god - there is not that that is not you.

 

 

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Buddhism is not about liberation FOR a self but FROM a self.

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