Fu_dog

Flying Phoenix Chi Kung

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just a practice update ... inspired by the eastover videos... i finally exceeded 40 min long form practice Tues morning!!!

Mirror image done very early in the morning ... the only interruption of the silence was the coyote's waking up,:ph34r:.

my previous day practice had been limited as we went to see  Walk with Me, documentary on Thich Nhat Hanh / Plum Village in Tucson..  So at the end of the day  I did  follow the youtube of Sifu Dunn long form ... 10 min version in mirror image. and followed that with "preparation for 8 sections combined" short form  (12 min ).  An d Tuesday morning at 4:30 am broke the 40 min barrier.   Since then i have done 36 min and 34 min right side/normal long form on Wed. and Thur.   On both days I have also done the five standing short form.   tomorrow I will be on the road to So Cal to see my grandsons so I may  not get to practice quite so seriously.  I continue to do my Tjq class and some 5 element qi gong.   I am trying to encourage my wife to up her commitment to qi gong now that she has good mastery of Tjq long and short forms.  She continues to have a slight tachycardia and Afib.  

enough  i have to pack for trip, prep car, and take time to feed the cows  ...

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Hi Sifu Terry!

 

I like to do things in pairs, or couplets, so I came up with a prayer couplet for the Queen Mother of the West. I'm just sharing it as a gift of positive energy for your Work, okay? :)

 

Shi Yao Fei Feng Xi Wang Mu,

Shi Rao Yi Feng Xi Wang Mu

 

藥飛鳳西王母     

施饒益豐西王母     ䷊    ( Yi Feng)

 

The first line you already know, and it has the Hexagram for "Ascending."

 

The second line uses the one character "rao" that means both "wealth/abundance"; and "mercy, pardon."  And the "feng" is a different character, meaning "abundance" rather than "phoenix" as in the first line.  (For my meditation, I see "rao" as both "abundance of mercy" and "mercy of abundance"; or "abundant mercy" and "merciful abundance"!)

 

Also for the second line, the words "yi" and "feng" have their own Hexagrams #42 and #55. The overall Hexagram for the 2nd line and invocation--for my own meditation, anyway--is #11, "Harmony." Just as the Immortal Twins who bestow prosperous commerce (com-merce; as well as comm-unication, comm-union, con-jugal, con-gruent, etc.) are also bestowers of harmony:

 

Shi Xi Xi He He Er Xian

 

施曦喜和合二仙      

 

 

Hope this brings a smile to you, at least!   :)

 

Edited by Songshou
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Quick question about the Sleeper meditation ( MSW4: 50 - 20 - 10), are you supposed to put the hands on the knees at the end of each round and then bring them back up for the next one, or do you go straight from one round to the next from the Sky Meditation/"prayer hands" posture and then only rest the palms on the knees when ending the meditation?

 

 

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5 hours ago, Aeran said:

Quick question about the Sleeper meditation ( MSW4: 50 - 20 - 10), are you supposed to put the hands on the knees at the end of each round and then bring them back up for the next one, or do you go straight from one round to the next from the Sky Meditation/"prayer hands" posture and then only rest the palms on the knees when ending the meditation?

 

 

 

I personally put the hands on the knees at the end of each round to rest based on what I saw, but clarification from Sifu Terry would be fantastic.

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On 2/19/2015 at 8:23 AM, zen-bear said:

And as I've stated earlier in the thread, quiet sitting is ALL-IMPORTANT.  No matter what yogas you do--whether Indian, Chinese, Tibetan, Egyptian, Persian, Toltec, etc.-- you must do quiet sitting.

So I always start absolute beginners off with quiet sitting meditation.  (This is easy and natural for me because Tao Tan Pai Neikung was the first system that I learned starting in 1974, and within the first level of TTP practice, called the Tao Tan Pai 31 (aka, Cloud Hands), there are about 4 static seated meditations [and 10 seated meditations with movements] that we used to do for long periods of time.)  

 

Not just Tao Tan Pai, but Chinese meditation in general begins with quiet sitting, as reflected in the I Ching:


	52. Kên / Keeping Still, Mountain		above  KêN  KEEPING STILL, MOUNTAIN		below  KêN  KEEPING STILL, MOUNTAIN  In its application to man, the hexagram turns upon the problem of achieving a quiet heart. It is very difficult to bring quiet to the heart. While Buddhism strives for rest through an ebbing away of all movement in nirvana, the Book of Changes holds that rest is merely a state of polarity that always posits movement as its complement. Possibly the words of the text embody directions for the practice of yoga.	THE JUDGMENT	KEEPING STILL. Keeping his back still	So that he no longer feels his body.	He goes into his courtyard	And does not see his people.	No blame.True quiet means keeping still when the time has come to keep still, and going forward when the time has come to go forward. In this way rest and movement are in agreement with the demands of the time, and thus there is light in life.  The hexagram signifies the end and the beginning of all movement. The back is named because in the back are located all the nerve fibers that mediate movement. If the movement of these spinal nerves is brought to a standstill, the ego, with its restlessness, disappears as it were. When a man has thus become calm, he may turn to the outside world. He no longer sees in it the struggle and tumult of individual beings, and therefore he has that true peace of mind which is needed for understanding the great laws of the universe and for acting in harmony with them. Whoever acts from these deep levels makes no mistakes.

 

Once the beginner has learned to sit quietly.  You can introduce him/her to any of the basic FP Meditations on Volume 1 and 2, which will only deepen the level of physical relaxation, mind-body integration, and mental absorption.  The contrast between quiet sitting meditation and any of the 3 Warm-up Meditations--and certainly with the 3  Monk Serves Wine meditations in Volume 2--is most profound and usually quite a revelation to anyone who meditates.

 

*Also, in addition to the seated FP Meditations on Volume 2, you can have him or her do Monk Holding Pearl (50 40 30 20 10) in seated half lotus position with hands resting at the tan tien.  (This is a key teaching and extra bonus meditation on Volume 1).

 

I was contemplating this post the other day and started to add in sitting meditation (staying in pure awareness with detachment to objects) for about an hour just after a session of FPQG (ie. long-form plus other statics). The results were very interesting - My heart seemed to glow with a lot of joy and blissfulness and it continued through the day. So I'm definitely not cutting out quiet-sitting practice for sure. :)

 

One thing I realized was that the clinging habits or tendencies became weaker after the entire session (FPQG + quiet-sitting). FPQG helped to establish that very serene-mind which made quiet-sitting much easier. Since both of them were not 'cognitive' in nature (ie. requiring some kind of conceptualizing) I thought they worked pretty well together as well.

 

I wanted to clarify though - I think Sifu terry mentioned that the quiet sitting in FPQG was the warmup meditations in vol 2 - Is this much different from sitting in emptiness meditation?

Edited by taoguy
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On 9/21/2017 at 9:06 AM, ridingtheox said:

just a practice update ... inspired by the eastover videos... i finally exceeded 40 min long form practice Tues morning!!!

Mirror image done very early in the morning ... the only interruption of the silence was the coyote's waking up,:ph34r:.

my previous day practice had been limited as we went to see  Walk with Me, documentary on Thich Nhat Hanh / Plum Village in Tucson..  So at the end of the day  I did  follow the youtube of Sifu Dunn long form ... 10 min version in mirror image. and followed that with "preparation for 8 sections combined" short form  (12 min ).  An d Tuesday morning at 4:30 am broke the 40 min barrier.   Since then i have done 36 min and 34 min right side/normal long form on Wed. and Thur.   On both days I have also done the five standing short form.   tomorrow I will be on the road to So Cal to see my grandsons so I may  not get to practice quite so seriously.  I continue to do my Tjq class and some 5 element qi gong.   I am trying to encourage my wife to up her commitment to qi gong now that she has good mastery of Tjq long and short forms.  She continues to have a slight tachycardia and Afib.  

enough  i have to pack for trip, prep car, and take time to feed the cows  ...

Hi Charlie,

 

Thanks for your excellent report on your progress of approaching the speed of the shifting sand dune in doing the Long Form Standing Meditation (FPHHCM on Vol.4).  I'm glad the videos from the Eastover workshops served you well as the standard reference for speed of moving meditations in the FP System.  I hope you get your wife sufficiently hooked on FP Qigong soon!

 

Note:  one doesn't have to practice the Long Form Standing Meditation approaching 40 minutes every time.  But as long as you  continually and gradually stretches your practice to longer durations, you will be developing greater total body relaxation and attaining higher (deeper) absorption-jhana.   I was not exaggerating nor kidding when I posted that FP Qigong can serve as the meditation vehicle to carry one right up to the threshold of the Formless or Immaterial Jhanas.  

 

Reminder and suggestion to all:  try moving at such super-slow speeds while doing the seated Flying Phoenix meditations as well--i.e., the "Monk Serves Wine" series (first 8 of which are on Volumes 2 and 7 of DVD series).

 

***And come to October 6-8 Flying Phoenix Qigong Workshop at eastover to get corrections and perfect your meditations to maximize the health, longevity, and spiritual benefits of this art.  12 Days before it begins.  Info here:

 

                   http://www.eastover.com/terence-dunn-2.html     

 

Cheers and happy travels.  (--I'm also equipping my vehicle for a long cross-country drive in a few days).

 

Sifu Terry

 

 

www.taichimania.com/chikung_catalog.html

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14 hours ago, taoguy said:

 

I was contemplating this post the other day and started to add in sitting meditation (staying in pure awareness with detachment to objects) for about an hour just after a session of FPQG (ie. long-form plus other statics). The results were very interesting - My heart seemed to glow with a lot of joy and blissfulness and it continued through the day. So I'm definitely not cutting out quiet-sitting practice for sure. :)

 

One thing I realized was that the clinging habits or tendencies became weaker after the entire session (FPQG + quiet-sitting). FPQG helped to establish that very serene-mind which made quiet-sitting much easier. Since both of them were not 'cognitive' in nature (ie. requiring some kind of conceptualizing) I thought they worked pretty well together as well.

 

I wanted to clarify though - I think Sifu terry mentioned that the quiet sitting in FPQG was the warmup meditations in vol 2 - Is this much different from sitting in emptiness meditation?

Hi Taoguy,

 

Answers to your questions:

 

One thing I realized was that the clinging habits or tendencies became weaker after the entire session (FPQG + quiet-sitting). FPQG helped to establish that very serene-mind which made quiet-sitting much easier. Since both of them were not 'cognitive' in nature (ie. requiring some kind of conceptualizing) I thought they worked pretty well together as well.

 

Yes, you've experienced what practically every serious meditator who tries FP Qigong--especially the seated MSW meditations--discovers:  that quiet sitting (emptiness) is so much more easier and so much more comfortable and enjoyable than doing it before having experienced the FP Qigong integrative and energizing effects.

 

I wanted to clarify though - I think Sifu terry mentioned that the quiet sitting in FPQG was the warmup meditations in vol 2 - Is this much different from sitting in emptiness meditation?

 

--No, that's not what I meant with this sentence.  Just take my sentence literally: 

The contrast between quiet sitting meditation and any of the 3 Warm-up Meditations--and certainly with the 3  Monk Serves Wine meditations in Volume 2--is most profound and usually quite a revelation to anyone who meditates.

I meant to say that  the first three Monk Serves Wine preparatory meditations or "warm-ups" on Vol.2 when they are first experienced by meditators, their experience is revelatory and a sublime boost to their practice.

 

Sifu Terry Dunn

 

 

http://www.eastover.com/terence-dunn-2.html

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On 9/23/2017 at 10:51 AM, Aeran said:

Quick question about the Sleeper meditation ( MSW4: 50 - 20 - 10), are you supposed to put the hands on the knees at the end of each round and then bring them back up for the next one, or do you go straight from one round to the next from the Sky Meditation/"prayer hands" posture and then only rest the palms on the knees when ending the meditation?

 

 

Hi Aeran,

 

Earl Grey has provided the correct answer.  I have been doing it the same way since I learned the meditation.

 

After you bring the hands up the centerline with back of the hands touching and turn the palms clasped in the final position in front of the heart, you want to end and demarcate that exercise by floating the palms down to the knees.  When Grandmaster Doo Wai taught this too me (and I just checked the video of his demo in 1991), the last movement of floating the palms down to the knees is just as focussed and at the same speed as all the preceding movements.  

 

Then to start the next round of the meditation, bring the palms back up to the centerline and at heart-level.

 

**Also, I will give a nuanced teaching for this particular meditation, "the Sleeper" (50 20 10) so as to encourage all serious FP practitioners to try to attend my workshops at Eastover:

 

A)   This meditation starts with the palms in front of the heart.

 

B )  When one brings the palms up the centerline with back of the hands touching and turn the palms clasped in "prayer" position, you actually bring the fingertips up to the third eye (brow chakra) for a split second, and then slowly lower the palms back down to the heart level.

 

See what that does for you.

 

You are all very welcome!!

 

Sifu Terry Dunn

 

 

http://www.eastover.com/terence-dunn-2.html  

 

 

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9 hours ago, zen-bear said:

Hi Aeran,

 

Earl Grey has provided the correct answer.  I have been doing it the same way since I learned the meditation.

 

After you bring the hands up the centerline with back of the hands touching and turn the palms clasped in the final position in front of the heart, you want to end and demarcate that exercise by floating the palms down to the knees.  When Grandmaster Doo Wai taught this too me (and I just checked the video of his demo in 1991), the last movement of floating the palms down to the knees is just as focussed and at the same speed as all the preceding movements.  

 

Then to start the next round of the meditation, bring the palms back up to the centerline and at heart-level.

 

**Also, I will give a nuanced teaching for this particular meditation, "the Sleeper" (50 20 10) so as to encourage all serious FP practitioners to try to attend my workshops at Eastover:

 

A)   This meditation starts with the palms in front of the heart.

 

B )  When one brings the palms up the centerline with back of the hands touching and turn the palms clasped in "prayer" position, you actually bring the fingertips up to the third eye (brow chakra) for a split second, and then slowly lower the palms back down to the heart level.

 

See what that does for you.

 

You are all very welcome!!

 

Sifu Terry Dunn

 

 

http://www.eastover.com/terence-dunn-2.html  

 

 

 

Thanks Sifu (and Earl!), good to know I've got it down properly going forward. Insomnia has been a bit of a long term issue for me, so I'm hoping daily practice of MSW3 & MSW4 in the morning and evening respectively will help me make some progress on that front.

 

And thanks for the tip on raising the hands up to the brow center - just out of curiosity I think I'll spend another week or so doing it the way you practice it on the DVD to make sure I've got a feel for the meditation, then integrate this extra movement, it should be a cool experiment to see if I can spot the difference between the two. I'll report back in the thread and let you guys know the results.

 

Cheers :D

 

 

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9 hours ago, zen-bear said:

Yes, you've experienced what practically every serious meditator who tries FP Qigong--especially the seated MSW meditations--discovers:  that quiet sitting (emptiness) is so much more easier and so much more comfortable and enjoyable than doing it before having experienced the FP Qigong integrative and energizing effects.

 

Thank you Sifu Terry. I can absolutely see this, I just did quiet sitting right after some short FPQG practice yesterday again and the energizing effect seems to be on a different level. Today I woke up after just 5 hours of sleep feeling extremely refreshed but I am unsure whether to attribute it to this practice, so I will just continue doing this to see what happens. I was literally unable to go back to sleep after waking up, this has never really happened before because I normally have massive sleep debt from working long hours. Also, my energy levels seem to be high even late in the afternoon as I type this.

 

Yesterday when meditating, I was able to slip into a state of non-duality where there was no content or perceiver. It was intermittent, slipping in and out of the state and I hope I can stabilize that soon. It's a little astonishing how the FPQG enables this so easily, and all I did was basic zuo-wang meditation.

 

Also hopefully I can extend my timings for the forms by going deeper into stillness.

Edited by taoguy
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I tend to do my quiet sitting practice first thing in the morning, just after getting out of bed, and I find it seems to give a strong "second wind" type effect to the energy built up from the previous day's practice. Just doing basic quiet sitting, calming the mind, relaxing the body and regulating the breath, seems to enhance and prolong the circulation of the FP Qi from whichever practices I was working on the day before.

 

I can't say with absolute certainty that FP has enhanced the effects of my quiet sitting, since I took a break from both practices for so long up until this year (although I suspect that it has - certainly my quiet sitting practice has progressed further than before), but the quiet sitting certainly seems to enhance the FP practice and extend it's effects, as well as those of any other Qigong I did the day before.

 

On a side note, I'm curious if anyone else has practiced MSW1 before sleep and noticed any effect on their dreaming? I've been finding that it induces a very strange state of consciousness when I sleep directly after the practice - not quite lucid dreaming, which would entail awareness off and control over the events of the dream, but more like an "observer effect," where a part of my mind is sitting back from the dream and observing it as you would a movie, while otherwise just sitting and thinking about regular things. It's quite surreal, but not unpleasant. Definitely makes me wonder about the potential for deeper states of consciousness with continued practice of the MSW meditations.

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16 hours ago, Aeran said:

I tend to do my quiet sitting practice first thing in the morning, just after getting out of bed, and I find it seems to give a strong "second wind" type effect to the energy built up from the previous day's practice. Just doing basic quiet sitting, calming the mind, relaxing the body and regulating the breath, seems to enhance and prolong the circulation of the FP Qi from whichever practices I was working on the day before.

 

I can't say with absolute certainty that FP has enhanced the effects of my quiet sitting, since I took a break from both practices for so long up until this year (although I suspect that it has - certainly my quiet sitting practice has progressed further than before), but the quiet sitting certainly seems to enhance the FP practice and extend it's effects, as well as those of any other Qigong I did the day before.

 

On a side note, I'm curious if anyone else has practiced MSW1 before sleep and noticed any effect on their dreaming? I've been finding that it induces a very strange state of consciousness when I sleep directly after the practice - not quite lucid dreaming, which would entail awareness off and control over the events of the dream, but more like an "observer effect," where a part of my mind is sitting back from the dream and observing it as you would a movie, while otherwise just sitting and thinking about regular things. It's quite surreal, but not unpleasant. Definitely makes me wonder about the potential for deeper states of consciousness with continued practice of the MSW meditations.

 

MSW meditations definitely impact my quality of sleep and dreams. Sometimes I feel like I'm plunging into a different world and this is the dream itself when I awaken. 

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Yes, I get extremely vivid dreams after evening practice. It's actually reignited my interest in lucid dreaming.

 

I have also seen a deepening in my daily mindfulness meditation. Similarly, my other practices enhance the FP energy, particularly the medicine buddha mantra, which Eric Isen said in a recent reading would have a synergistic healing effect with FP for me.  

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