Earl Grey

The Dao Bums
  • Content count

    4,640
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    59

About Earl Grey

  • Rank
    Duke of Earl, Erl-King in Bloom, and Grey Lord of Balance

Recent Profile Visitors

11,400 profile views
  1. A little friendly note for consistency and clarity as I've seen a personal message copied to the bottom of a welcome post a while ago that was eventually quickly edited a while back, and today I'm seeing things like "The Tao Bums" in welcome posts just now as opposed to Dao but still using initials TDB. I know it's a really hard and taxing job, but a little careful checking rather than copy and pasting can save a lot of trouble and confusion for some people.
  2. What made YOU laugh today/tonight ?

    That was a joke in my post—a political crap joke. 💩
  3. Evocation

    Among other things such as asking you for help with a yantra to control someone and you yourself told him not to PM you to beg for help on another thread. Just more begging and having other people do the work for him.
  4. What made YOU laugh today/tonight ?

    It's also missing the people taking selfies and saying that they were there representing or making up for centuries of racism by taking a selfie with non-whites. A selfie will make a difference...in your social media status updates.
  5. This article is misleading. It implies that cancel culture is the lesser evil of the two and can be tolerated, but the problem is that both are ultimately terrible things in the current zeitgeist.
  6. What about a Bums retreat?

    I'll be in your site because it's closer, cheaper, and the other people I know are closer there.
  7. What made YOU laugh today/tonight ?

    my dogs and cats were all resting peacefully in various parts of my flat when I went to use the bathroom before taking a nap. Coming out, i saw that i was vetoed out by the democratic principle as all five of them took over my bed and were so adorable cuddling together that i decided to sleep on the floor instead after stealing a pillow from them.
  8. simplify

    Spank. 😁
  9. Yes, meditation does this and I have that article cited in my discussion thread on the dangers of meditation as a bandaid rather than a dedicated practice. This is also why I find the Taoist meditations from seated golden flower to Zhan Zhuang to be even more dangerous because they not only open to mindfulness that brings these issues to the surface, but make qi rise (especially to the head). Combining the two leads to unpleasant results.
  10. Great decision. I hope you are surrounded by caring and supportive individuals, and that those who are there for you are encouraging of your interest in internal arts.
  11. Yes, this caveat is crucial. Thank you. The problem is that most people either don't take it seriously or their own self-assessment doesn't just ignore their issues, but in a bizarre contradiction, hope Zhan Zhuang can help yet don't believe that it will affect them negatively (which it can and does). True story: a student who was bipolar insisted she was fine, and her state led her to not just vomit from the discomfort, but triggered a manic episode for two days afterwards due to qi rising to her head. We had to pick her up from jail later on after she was restrained.
  12. If it's "just standing" then you really need to re-examine your definition of just what ZZ is. It is a stance, but then that is saying that art is just colors on paper, making there no difference between a child's scribbles and Jackson Pollock, or even movements like Dadaism and Neocubism. Simply put, ZZ is seemingly simple, but there is actually a lot of nuance that one discovers. As a practitioner of Yiquan from a formal lineage and instructor, this is why we don't just allow people to stand from the beginning without a lot of discernment and preparation. There is a big difference between someone who thinks it's just standing and someone who knows it is not just a complete system in of itself, but has multiple layers of complexity--hence why @freeform and I are talking about the dangers of mental health, and you are talking about other systems in general but not naming anything specific--again going to conjecture and overgeneralization. Your tendency to overgeneralize isn't helping the OP. But besides the fact you ignored the rebuttals that shut down your points previously, it seems like this discussion is more or less dead.
  13. Still an overstatement. A person who stood for one class is registered in that statistic—I am talking about people who practice regularly. You need to provide numbers rather than conjecture and understand that of those millions, you have to consider Inner Mongolia and Tibet, Xinjiang, and other remote areas or if there are even adequate programs. The statistics in China are horribly inaccurate in everything from education to health—take for example how a hospital that former member Walker worked in and he explains doctors are inclined to convince patients to leave and if they die after discharge, they don’t fall under the fatalities recorded in hospital deaths. A trick to make the numbers look good. Focus on quality, not on quantity. You are basically saying someone can stand regularly while your stats refer to any range of people standing from a one-off workshop to high school kids standing ten minutes for a class one semester, and this isn’t even looking at quality. Going by weird numbers is also ridiculously anti-TCM because they treat INDIVIDUALS, not numbers or symptoms. A good guide is necessary to help a practitioner in their own body. Otherwise, go tell people to learn rocket science (a far easier skill than the intricacies of proper Zhan Zhuang and cultivation) since there are both books and sites on Google and baidu to learn. You could even replace Zhan Zhuang with any sport like shooting guns at the firing range or skateboarding and assume no danger because of high numbers! Otherwise, if not physical health, remember that mental health is also at risk!
  14. Platitudes endorsing self-learning—okay. It isn’t a hard rule that you CAN’T self-learn, but from technical and statistical perspectives, the likelihood of ANY benefit is quite low and the risks are high. It’s better doing a safer qigong practice than going into standing. You are talking about qigong now but that is not Zhan Zhuang nor is it predicated on whether they were practicing complicated forms with good guidance or not, and the “millions” statistic is already questionable if not hyperbole. A poor redirection argument tactic. As for not making it worse enough to see a doctor, often a doctor won’t know what to look for as someone trained in TCM or Ayurveda and even chiropractors will see things that are affected by improper practice. Understand the risks and ignore the platitudes while looking at the skill and structure, health and achievement of those advocating self-learning versus those who advice caution (but don’t outright say DO NOT).