Green Tiger

Handstand on Mt. Huashan

Recommended Posts

This is the new frontier of female seduction :D

 

Do you want to seduce that guy?

Go on mount Huashan and perform a headstand: everyone will fall in love :wub:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few days ago I saw a teenage boy stand on one leg on a vertically mounted log embedded into a collapsing cliff, part of an old structure that was intended, and failed, to stop the collapse. The abyss underneath his feet was not as deep as on Mt. Huashan, just about deep enough for the fall to kill him if he made a wrong move. A bunch of his friends were watching. Awesome balance, awesome courage. It was along my walking qigong trail, which is narrow (running right along the edge of the cliffs over the ocean, but safe if you don't think up something adventurous), and I had to stop and watch. Three thoughts flashed through my mind:

 

1. Damn video games, they raised a whole generation that can't tell real from virtual.

2. I should take a picture.

3. Daoists don't risk their life unnecessarily, this boy is awesome but he's of another world, a world where life is not valued, something else is.

 

I didn't take a picture because just as I was going to, he wobbled, and I didn't want a young death recorded on my phone, bad juju. Then I remembered that I did stuff of this nature when I was a kid too, remembered the thrill. I stopped taking crazy risks when exactly, I asked myself. Oh... when I was pregnant. That was the end of a sense of invincibility I had when the only life I was responsible for was my own.

Edited by Taomeow
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I stopped doing crazy stuff when I got sick of getting hurt :D

 

 

but...never stuff like that...

 

or this :D

 

66fb8a691b7bae75d4b2208170eb86654ab7d9eb

 

5eLaXDe.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few days ago I saw a teenage boy stand on one leg on a vertically mounted log embedded into a collapsing cliff, part of an old structure that was intended, and failed, to stop the collapse. The abyss underneath his feet was not as deep as on Mt. Huashan, just about deep enough for the fall to kill him if he made a wrong move. A bunch of his friends were watching. Awesome balance, awesome courage. It was along my walking qigong trail, which is narrow (running right along the edge of the cliffs over the ocean, but safe if you don't think up something adventurious), and I had to stop and watch. Three thoughts flashed through my mind:

 

1. Damn video games, they raised a whole generation that can't tell real from virtual.

2. I should take a picture.

3. Daoists don't risk their life unnecessarily, this boy is awesome but he's of another world, a world where life is not valued, something else is.

 

I didn't take a picture because just as I was going to, he wobbled, and I didn't want a young death recorded on my phone, bad juju. Then I remembered that I did stuff of this nature when I was a kid too, remembered the thrill. I stopped taking crazy risks when exactly, I asked myself. Oh... when I was pregnant. That was the end of a sense of invincibility I had when the only life I was responsible for was my own.

 

Yeah, something tells me the girl doing the handstand on mt huashan does not have any kids.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah, when I think back about how many times I came so very close to...if one little thing were off or a little different about the scenario...

 

...I'd not be typing this today. :blush:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah, when I think back about how many times I came so very close to...if one little thing were off or a little different about the scenario...

 

...I'd not be typing this today. :blush:

 

I have climbed down into canyons on moonless nights in July without a flashlight where western diamondback rattlesnakes hang out. This particular canyon required climbing down rock face which was not that technical but was the only way in or out of the canyon. Most of the 800 ft. climb is as shown in the first photo but there are areas of rock face that must be traversed and climbing at night by feel is no easy task. I always wonder what I would have done with a rattler on that rock face. The Western Diamondback is aggressive and mean!

 

Below are photos of Alamo canyon which is part of Bandelier National Monument. These canyons were formed from volcanic eruptions millions of years ago.

 

10November-new_gtnp_for_calendar-012.jpg

 

 

04.jpg

 

 

 

Alamo%20canyon-2.JPG

Edited by ralis
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For most, it'd be stupid and foolhardy, but if you're really good at headstands, years and years of experience, then its probably as safe as standing. Hell just walking along that path seems a bit crazy. It may not be wise, but I have a certain admiration for those who .. hang out at the edge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites