dmattwads

What does standing meditation do to/for you?

217 posts in this topic

Chi in the body is neither air nor oxygen! The idea that chi is air originated because the ancient ones did not know the details of the breathing system, and what they felt in their bodies does feel a bit like wind sometimes.

 

Okay....

May I ask when you do Chi Kung, do you do lots of breathing exercise, perhaps the abdominal breathing ......???

1 person thanks this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I met one guy who breathed from the throat. It was awesome! His whole body like expanded.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

May I ask when you do Chi Kung, do you do lots of breathing exercise, perhaps the abdominal breathing ......???

 

No, the moving standing part of my chi kung has absolutely no breathing exercises, except once in a while, as part of a certain movement, we will breath out with the heart healing sound. I always breath with abdominal breathing, it's part of life, not chi kung, but somehow my chi kung trained me to do it. Everyone should breath like Darth Vader except without all the noise.

 

During one of our sitting meditations, of which we went through hundreds, we hummed at certain tones, however we did that meditation for the longest of any, and towards the end of the eight year apprenticeship, abecause it was an advanced* practice. This humming sound, with each one being as long as possible, makes a person naturally breath with full deep breaths without focusing on the breathing. In other words, it's the softest style of breathing exercise because you don't need to focus on it.

 

---------------

 

*advanced: does not mean the beginners are having it withheld from them and that therefore they should focus on it (then it becomes fundamentalism, doesn't it). Advanced means you get the most benefit out of it after you have progressed along the Way. Beginners won't get nearly the benefit from it that a more advanced person would because it has a synergistic effect with the other exercises that were done just before.

Edited by Starjumper
2 people thank this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, the moving standing part of my chi kung has absolutely no breathing exercises, except once in a while, as part of a certain movement, we will breath out with the heart healing sound. I always breath with abdominal breathing, it's part of life, not chi kung, but somehow my chi kung trained me to do it. Everyone should breath like Darth Vader except without all the noise.

 

I think you have answered my question. Without realizing the purpose of Chi Kung, but you have accomplished what Chi Kung does for you.

 

 

PS.....

You have made my day. You are the first person who have given me a satisfactory answer about Chi Kung, even though it was indirectly......... :) :) :D

Edited by ChiDragon
1 person thanks this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can vouch for the power of the Wu Chi stand. I have been practicing for 5 months and I am up to 30 minutes. I am a 62 year old man weighing 345 pounds – honest – but I feel 20 years younger. My tendonitis is getting better and my sex drive is much stronger. I’m hooked for life.

 

I learned the basics from Bruce Frantzis's I Chuan DVD set, part of his Xing-I documentation. Lam Kam Chuen's books and DVD are basically the same thing. You do not need to be excruciatingly correct, in my experience, to get great benefits from this. All I do is the most basic stand, hands at sides. Following Bruce's lead, at first I focussed obsessively on my internal state, body feelings, chi movement, etc. Then I broke down and watched X-Men movies. No difference I can feel/see. But try watching Vanilla Sky - *that* should wake you up.

 

Take my advice and don’t wait until you’re a fat old man like me – start standing today, and keep it up, every single day, even if it’s only five minutes. You WILL feel your chi move and your sinking will improve like crazy, until you feel something like the Amazon river running from your head to your feet. Do it!!!

6 people thank this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

standing meditation

for me it gave me a strong sensation of heat in my hands.

I did it for a while before years .

1 person thanks this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If anyone has an interest in cranio-sacral therapy, standing meditation is a great way to improve your sensitivity.

2 people thank this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do the '8 Pieces' standing form.

That's fine cultivation.

Edited by GrandmasterP
1 person thanks this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have "The Way of Energy", does one need to do the 8 brocades as a warm up, or could you just do the knee, hip and arm rotations with wu chi as a warmup before standing..

 

Dan

1 person thanks this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dan

 

The knee, hip, arm warm-ups followed by Wu chi are recommended for beginners. After a few weeks of practice, Master Lam advices in the book beginning with the 8 brocades before standing. Both are fine but the latter requires more time and has deeper effects.

 

Best,

2 people thank this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If anyone has an interest in cranio-sacral therapy, standing meditation is a great way to improve your sensitivity.

 

Very interesting. I took a craniosacral workshop years ago and have always had it in the back of my mind as something I need to get into but never really have.

 

What is it, do you think, about standing that improves sensitivity for craniosacral work? Is this something you´ve found from your own experience?

 

Thanks,

 

Liminal

1 person thanks this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very interesting. I took a craniosacral workshop years ago and have always had it in the back of my mind as something I need to get into but never really have.

 

What is it, do you think, about standing that improves sensitivity for craniosacral work? Is this something you´ve found from your own experience?

 

Thanks,

 

Liminal

 

Disclaimer - I have very little craniosacral experience and lots of standing experience.

My very close friend is a craniosacral therapist and very experienced meditator.

If you stand for long enough, you become aware of the subtle things going on in the body, including the craniosacral rhythms and still points, presumably through a heightening of internal awareness and sensitivity. These rhythms are subtle and you need to know what to look/feel for as you are aware I'm sure, if you've done a workshop. I think standing is particularly useful in sensing the craniosacral rhythms because of the upright posture. This can then be brought to the therapeutic interaction. Sitting meditation may not be as effective because of the flexion of the hips and knees.

As I said, my experience is quite limited and I base my comments mostly on my friend's experience.

3 people thank this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

apparently "The Way of Healing" is also a good book, from what Ive read it uses a different set of warmups and is considered to be a less demanding.

1 person thanks this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I highly recommend climbing 1000 meter vertical granite or relatively steep alpine walls at altitude.

 

It is a very effective method for maintaining concentration in the face of occasionally almost certain danger and sometimes nearly avoidable death/carnage.

 

Even climbing relatively short cliffs over crashing ocean waves is found to be extremely helpful.

 

Solo-climbing without safety equipment sharpens one's degree of concentration and mindfulness.

 

Don't even think about falling! Attending to the task at hand is sufficient in spite of the objective realities and trains the mind and body to exercise equipoise under extreme psychological pressure and physical hardship.

1 person thanks this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...

 

I highly recommend climbing 1000m vertical granite or relatively steep alpine walls at altitude.

 

You gotta be kiddin' me!

 

I got fear a heights!!

 

An' FLY YIN!!!

 

;)

:)

XXX

...

Edited by Captain Mar-Vell
1 person thanks this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Standing meditation forces you to relax the muscles and use proper skeletal structure along with stretching the tendons. Basically it is an exercise to relax. . It makes your body more efficient, also it helps calm your mind and to become aware of your body. It least that is what it is like for me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I highly recommend climbing 1000 meter vertical granite or relatively steep alpine walls at altitude.

 

It is a very effective method for maintaining concentration in the face of occasionally almost certain danger and sometimes nearly avoidable death/carnage.

 

Even climbing relatively short cliffs over crashing ocean waves is found to be extremely helpful.

 

Solo-climbing without safety equipment sharpens one's degree of concentration and mindfulness.

 

Don't even think about falling! Attending to the task at hand is sufficient in spite of the objective realities and trains the mind and body to exercise equipoise under extreme psychological pressure and physical hardship.

I agree.

Started climbing (sans gear) in my teens and continued until my 30's when body issues brought that chapter to a close. It's a short trip into the pure focal zone of presence/awareness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites