Cameron

Do Ya'll guys drink?

Recommended Posts

 

Which may explain why alcohol feels toxic to you, from the neuroendocrine perspective. A weakness for sweets and starches is essentially an addiction to serotonin, sugar being the most popular metabolic shortcut. Alcohol, on the other hand, is a shortcut to adrenaline (and also, to an extent, norepinephrine, dopamine, and a bunch of other neurotransmitters), but not serotonin. A serotonin addiction is a symptom of depleted ability to produce it internally (all addictions are unconscious attempts at self-medication). Against this backdrop, one may deplete his or her serotonin stores still further by drinking alcohol, since the metabolic mechanisms for releasing various neurotransmitters partially overlap and compete. Feeling low on serotonin, in some people, produces that same subjectively "toxic" state via just skipping a couple of meals. Would you say you are also in this category? Curious.

As in, if I don't eat, do I get low? Yes, extremely. And aggressive...in a very flappy, lash-out/mindless sort of way.

 

Basically, I feel like a machine that constantly needs refueling with sugar. Although I eat plenty of meat and veg, I also need cereal in the morning on top of, say, eggs and toast. 2 hours later I will need a banana and then I will have a healthy lunch and dinner. BUT then my body itches for biscuits. Ideally chocolate. It's the only way I can stop myself going crazy haha.

 

I am quite active though so I guess it's all supplementing my use of energy.

 

Interesting fact about the alcohol vs sugar though. I am surprised because alcohol still contains a lot of sugar. Do you mean that the alcohol itself over powers it when it is going into the body?

Edited by Rara
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to drink a lot when I joined my fraternity.....but it was more of a social thing....I would get drunk at parties but when at home I never had a drop, nor did I have the desire to drink.

I rarely drink anymore simply because I don't party or go out to bars that much. But mainly I don't drink because I like practicing Chi Kung more.....and it's not good to practice while intoxicated....I lose hours that I could've spent training, which I love a lot more than a friendly broosky. :)

My 2 cents, Peace

Edited by OldChi
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As in, if I don't eat, do I get low? Yes, extremely. And aggressive...in a very flappy, lash-out/mindless sort of way.

 

Basically, I feel like a machine that constantly needs refueling with sugar. Although I eat plenty of meat and veg, I also need cereal in the morning on top of, say, eggs and toast. 2 hours later I will need a banana and then I will have a healthy lunch and dinner. BUT then my body itches for biscuits. Ideally chocolate. It's the only way I can stop myself going crazy haha.

 

I am quite active though so I guess it's all supplementing my use of energy.

 

Interesting fact about the alcohol vs sugar though. I am surprised because alcohol still contains a lot of sugar. Do you mean that the alcohol itself over powers it when it is going into the body?

 

It depends on the type of beverage and goes both ways -- alcohol itself is partially converted to sugar in the body, but sugar is also partially converted into alcohol (aldehyde) in the body, which is why alcohol with extra sugar makes one more drunk than the same amount of alcohol without. How people metabolize either is pretty individual, it depends on what diet they consume regularly and what meal (or no meal) was consumed prior, during, or after drinking; which neurotransmitters are low or high at the baseline; levels of circulating MAO which degrades them upon release, also liver enzymes and functions (there is, e.g., a master enzyme for addressing alcohol in the body which is either low or absent in one-third of the Asian populations, which is why many people of Asian descent either can't drink at all or might become alcoholics with lightning speed upon exposure), and so on.

 

In your case, serotonin seems to be your primary stress mediator and painkiller (which is what monoamines are all of them). If you wanted to drink alcohol, you would probably have no ill effects you describe if you were to drink it the traditional way, i.e. with a fatty meal rather than over a light snack or a carb or, worse, just by itself. But if you don't want to drink, no reason to, of course.

 

And if you wanted to rearrange your metabolism toward less dependency on sugar, I'd look into the paleo diet which, in the shape and form I experimented with ("Primal Body, Primal Mind" by Nora Gedgaudas) eliminates all cravings for carbs within 48 hours -- and permanently for as long as you keep to the protocol. It's not an easy eating habit to maintain though because the whole industrial society is geared toward activating and maintaining the glycogen-burning secondary, emergency system instead of the ketones-burning primary system of human metabolism. If you tried drinking on a paleo diet (which it discourages, actually, but mostly due to the author's heavy aversion to the idea of consumed sugar in any shape or form -- which IMO ignores other properties of alcohol worth considering, notably its protective effect on telomeres, the "immortality machine" of life) -- as I was saying, if you were on a different diet and tried to drink with that, you'd be surprised how differently your body might react.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

It depends on the type of beverage and goes both ways -- alcohol itself is partially converted to sugar in the body, but sugar is also partially converted into alcohol (aldehyde) in the body, which is why alcohol with extra sugar makes one more drunk than the same amount of alcohol without. How people metabolize either is pretty individual, it depends on what diet they consume regularly and what meal (or no meal) was consumed prior, during, or after drinking; which neurotransmitters are low or high at the baseline; levels of circulating MAO which degrades them upon release, also liver enzymes and functions (there is, e.g., a master enzyme for addressing alcohol in the body which is either low or absent in one-third of the Asian populations, which is why many people of Asian descent either can't drink at all or might become alcoholics with lightning speed upon exposure), and so on.

 

In your case, serotonin seems to be your primary stress mediator and painkiller (which is what monoamines are all of them). If you wanted to drink alcohol, you would probably have no ill effects you describe if you were to drink it the traditional way, i.e. with a fatty meal rather than over a light snack or a carb or, worse, just by itself. But if you don't want to drink, no reason to, of course.

 

And if you wanted to rearrange your metabolism toward less dependency on sugar, I'd look into the paleo diet which, in the shape and form I experimented with ("Primal Body, Primal Mind" by Nora Gedgaudas) eliminates all cravings for carbs within 48 hours -- and permanently for as long as you keep to the protocol. It's not an easy eating habit to maintain though because the whole industrial society is geared toward activating and maintaining the glycogen-burning secondary, emergency system instead of the ketones-burning primary system of human metabolism. If you tried drinking on a paleo diet (which it discourages, actually, but mostly due to the author's heavy aversion to the idea of consumed sugar in any shape or form -- which IMO ignores other properties of alcohol worth considering, notably its protective effect on telomeres, the "immortality machine" of life) -- as I was saying, if you were on a different diet and tried to drink with that, you'd be surprised how differently your body might react.

Wow, thanks again Taomeow! Very insightful.

 

Yep, usually the one that gets me is the random offer of one or two beers mid afternoon. If I am to drink beer, I prefer it (like you said) with a good chicken, rice and veg meal. Then I can't handle more than one anyway as I'm too full :) I then recover much quicker.

 

I prefer red wine, but again, this would be with dinner and just after for glass two.

 

When you refer to "Asian", are you talking far east or does this include India etc too? I have Indian and Burmese blood so I wonder if that is a factor too!

 

As for Paleo, yes, in an ideal world haha. I travel about so much and often have to grab something out. This is what got me durimg my vegetarian stint. I practically had a diet of 30% veg/fruit/pulses to 70% bread, pasta, rice and pastry. Real limiting.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

snapshotimagehandler_1570109354.jpeg?h=5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites