Mal

Sun Salutation vs Hindi Squats and Pushups.

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I mean you're asking whether you should do say 10 sun salutations 2x a day to 10 hindi pushups 6x a day?

 

first off if you're doing hindi pushups you should be doing higher reps to get more benefits something like 25 is a better starting point. Squats too, the more the better. The Sun Salutation is great and I do it, as well as the other calisthenics but it is altogether a different animal. You are not going to get the same kind of strength benefits from a more flowing, whole body and lighter repetition exercise than from a very focused high rep one. You just won't. You're doing more work with push ups and squats so your muscles will respond better. You're best bet is to include all three. Warm up with Sun Salutation, crack out two dozen push ups then blast through fifty squats. You'll notice big improvements.

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I've just started adding a few 'Hindu squats' to my exercise but I was wondering whether doing this every day was too much, I'm not sure how everyone else feels about that? Personally I've been doing about thirty a day for the last five days, question is should I have a break?

 

Can anyone let me know about the 'Hindu pushup' I'm not sure I'm familair with it?

 

Interesting and rather funny thread which I can empathise with; I often feel the same way when at work and find an empty office to do some training in for five minutes! :unsure:

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For me yoga is more about opening channels, quieting the mind. Like you said apples and oranges. Maybe do both let them compliment each other.

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Hi Mal,

 

This is just my opinion, but I think you would get increased benefits from Surya Namaskar by doing a continuous set of them (and sweating) rather than doing smaller sets throughout the day. Maybe as a warmup prior to your tai chi and kung fu. I think a lot of the benefits of it come from the internal heat and detoxification it generates. For "mini workouts" at work, you might want to look at the 7 tiger moves (see John Peterson's book "The Miracle Seven") or the 5 Tibetan Rites.

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I don't understand the question. Is the question about doing exercise at work without seeming weird? If that's the case, then what kind of goal do you have in mind? Is it strength? Is it endurance? Is it flexibility? Is it wisdom? Is it some mix of the above and if so, what's the order of importance?

 

Depending on what your desired benefit is, dynamic tension exercises can be good. They do look a little weird, but the cool thing is that you don't need to get on the floor or go upside down, and you can do them while sitting in the chair or in the bathroom or in the hallways, empty meeting rooms, empty offices, outside, etc. So for example, you can get a benefit similar to a push-up without touching the floor with your hands. It will still look a little weird though, so if seeming "normal" is a high value item for you, it's going to interfere.

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Hey Mal,

 

Have you ever thought of doing burpees? That way your working your upper body and lower body at the same time, getting your cardio, and developing explosive strength which is important since your a martial artist. You can start with a goal of 30 burpees and then work your way up from there, make it a game to see how many you can do in 2 mins :) In the beginning they don't have to be done fast but not done slow either, then once your strength increases put more explosiveness into your movements and more speed.

 

You can check out rosstraining.com for sample workouts or check out his forum, great guy responds to questions asked and believe there are some sample workouts posted somewhere.

 

I also had a desk job (laid off back in November) and found I was getting a lot of lower back pains and knee pains and nothing I was doing helped out. I had to cut kungfu down to 3 times per week because of it :( but with that extra time I searched the net looking for a "cure" and for me that was weightlifting. Squatting and deadlifting has helped me out tremendously, I have much much better posture now and no more knee or lower back pain, it's also helped my kungfu (increased muscle and bone density adds a lot of power to a relaxed strike)

 

I know you wouldn't be able to do that at work but maybe you could spare 10 mins once a week to lift something up? squats 5 sets of 5 reps. If you don't have access to weights you get an old duffel bag fill it with sand and duct tape it shut and use that :) or after kungfu you can ask one of your training partners to hop on your back.

 

Starting Strength Wiki

good site to get you or anyone else reading this started.

 

Oh and in case some are wondering no you will not get big like Arnold or become slow, just check out some of the Olympic weight lifters specifically the girls. You get girls who are 115lbs who can move enormous amounts of weight effortlessly and in the blink of an eye :lol:

 

OK enough blabbering from me !

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The Sun Salutations have been going very well. Glad I changed over.

 

I've been doing easy sets of 2 (i.e. one step back per leg) at 9,10 and 11 in the morning and then with a bit more upper body focus at 1,2, and 3 the afternoon at work. Plus whatever I feel like on the weekends (usually only 2 or 3x as opposed to 6)

 

Easy. Enjoyable. Relaxing yet also energizing.

 

Flexibility is improving (more range of movement in toe touches and stepping back towards hands)

 

Posture improving, spinal erectors stronger, can feel spine elongate when stretching up.

 

No loss of upper body strength for 10~15 rep fingertip pushups, which it all I ever have to do for class. Have not tested to failure for normal hindi pushups but as mentioned I don't really need excessive upper body strength. Feel stronger but that is subjective. Seems to be no effect on leg strength (but I do a lot of other stuff too) but my left knee is no longer continually sore like it was when doing squats. Guess everyday squatting is not for me at my weight.

 

Doing a 10~15 min session of combat conditioning is still the best pure strength and endurance improver but there is more happening with Sun Salutations than you would expect from just a simple exercise. Although I guess I have plugged a fair bit of KAP into it with 5 point, hair and testy breathing along with connecting to the universe. If that makes any sense :lol:

 

Will be interesting to see how long I keep practicing, so far lots of fun :)

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Still enjoying doing Sun Salutations at work :D

 

Still just doing a set of 2 but now doing 4 times over the morning with an upper body focus i.e low planks, then 3 times over the afternoon on fingertips (if my arms feel like it, they usually do)

 

Want a bit more lower body conditioning now so also doing 1 slow squat before the Sun Saluations, then adding in 1 pistols on each leg at the end.

 

Can't get below 90 degrees on the pistols yet, will just see how that develops, no rush.

 

Good fun.

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yeah, sweating at work is a drag. My only alarm went off when I read your reference to the Royal Court - there are two camps regarding the Furey's backbridging - yes and absolutely not. A pilates instructor told me that the cervical vertebrae are not designed for compression; their function is rotation. Made sense to me, and you can still get the benefits with an ambitious 5 Tibetan Rites routine.

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yeah, sweating at work is a drag. My only alarm went off when I read your reference to the Royal Court - there are two camps regarding the Furey's backbridging - yes and absolutely not. A pilates instructor told me that the cervical vertebrae are not designed for compression; their function is rotation. Made sense to me, and you can still get the benefits with an ambitious 5 Tibetan Rites routine.

 

What would qualify as an ambitious routine?

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What would qualify as an ambitious routine?

The traditional way to do the Tibetans -- 3 daily reps of 5x24 to a total of 360.

 

I was thinking "this is the fifth Tibetan gone wrong" when I looked at the "Hindu push-ups." Poor mingmen. :(

 

So much strength-building stuff out there locks the Gate of Life and throws away the key... gotta be careful.

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they are integral part of the whole salutation sequence

 

iron buffalo plows the field in chinese circles

 

salute to the sun is figuratively whole

 

facing the sun rise and sunset

 

flowing east to the west

 

and back again

 

forwards

 

back

 

to

 

wf

ar

ro

dm

 

below

 

[c]they are integral part of the whole salutation sequence

 

iron buffalo plows the field in chinese circles

 

salute to the sun is figuratively whole

 

facing the sun rise and sunset

 

flowing east to the west

 

and back again

 

forwards

 

back

 

to

 

wf

ar

ro

dm

 

below[/c]

Edited by Spectrum

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Carson Zi,

 

Really enjoy your posts, thank you. I would really like to know more about the inner and out spirals that you described in the AYP thread. I've been practicing Yin yoga for quite a while now and am always looking for way to take it to higher level. Thanks.

 

Eric

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What would qualify as an ambitious routine?

 

When I'm feeling extra strong with my 5 Rites I slow down the movements and really concentrate on extending my range of motion, inhaling as deeply as possible without closing off the epiglottis at all (no holding the breath for even an instant - keep the airway open at all times). The 4th rite, the table, can be as challenging as you need it to be.

 

Taomeow, is the rep range of 24 in the book? My online source says the "magic" number is 21.

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Hi Eric :)

 

Carson Zi,

 

Really enjoy your posts, thank you. I would really like to know more about the inner and out spirals that you described in the AYP thread. I've been practicing Yin yoga for quite a while now and am always looking for way to take it to higher level. Thanks.

 

Eric

 

Thank you for the kind words. I am not posting much here at the Tao Bums these days, but I still log on and look for things that catch my eye every day.

 

Yin Yoga is the one style of yoga that the Universal Principles of Alignment won't help much with.....the reason being is that Yin Yoga is entirely different from any other style of Yoga. Yin Yoga was created (by Paul Grilley I believe) because Yang styles of Yoga can not stretch the connective tissues and the deeper fascia in the joints because the muscles are engaged. Yin Yoga is done with the muscles relaxed and the postures are held much much longer so that you can stretch the connective tissues in the joints. It is not physically possible to stretch these tissues with your muscles engaged so the Universal Principles of Alignment are not much help in Yin Yoga. So unfortunately my suggestions to Mal will not help you with your Yin Yoga practice. Sorry. But they certainly will help you (and anyone) who is practicing any style of Yang Yoga (ashtanga, Bikrams, Iyengar, Hatha, and on and on and on). Yin Yoga will also only take you so far as it will not stretch your muscle tissue (much). It is not designed for that. A balance between yin and yang styles is necessary to maximize your flexibility. I suggest watching the Yin Yoga DVD that Paul Grilley has if you want to know more about Yin Yoga. It is excellent.

 

Best of luck!

 

Love,

Carson :D

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Thanks Carson,

 

I'm fortunate to live in a city where we have a few yoga studios that offer Yin classes. I studied with a teacher (who took a workshop with Grilley) for about a year before my job was cut to part time and funds became an issue. I continue to do the practice at home every morning and get to a class for a refresher every now and again. I bought Bernie Clark's excellent book to have for reference.

 

My understanding is that Yin Yoga works the facia and the goal is to open the meridians that pass through. I've introduced mantra and mudra to the practice. Overall each yin asana turns out to be a nice 4-5 minute meditation. I've experienced some very profound moments of transformation while doing the practice. I do sprinkle in a few yang asanas to balance things out. Like all of us, I have a few tight muscle groups that need lots of work. Would still like to learn more about the principles of alignment for those yang asanas. Thanks.

 

Eric

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Hi eric :D

 

My understanding is that Yin Yoga works the facia and the goal is to open the meridians that pass through.

 

Yes....a main reason for Yin Yoga is to increase Hyleronic Acid production (which is what the meridians are made of) so you are right. Although Yang practice also works some of the surface fascia, the deeper fascia within the joints is never worked in Yang practice. And Yin also works the connective tissues in the joints (this is different from the fascia) which won't get any stretching at all from Yang styles of practice.

 

I've introduced mantra and mudra to the practice. Overall each yin asana turns out to be a nice 4-5 minute meditation. I've experienced some very profound moments of transformation while doing the practice.

 

Sounds absolutely wonderful sir!

 

I do sprinkle in a few yang asanas to balance things out. Like all of us, I have a few tight muscle groups that need lots of work. Would still like to learn more about the principles of alignment for those yang asanas. Thanks.

 

Ok. Here goes. As you read in the AYP thread, The Universal Principles of Alignment ("UPA" from now on....such a bitch to type that out every time ;) ) can be applied in every Yang style posture.

 

Step One is to engage all 4 corners of the feet....first the big toe mound, then the inner heel, then the little toe mound, and finally the outer heel. Even in inverted postures, even in sitting postures the feet must have muscle energy engaging all 4 corners of the feet. Also this is when we consciously bring the shoulders onto the back...meaning pulling the scapula (shoulder blades) closer together on the back and pulling the shoulders back and down, away from the ears. This pushes the chest out a bit and opens the heart. This step is called "Opening to Grace".

 

Step Two is called "Muscle Energy". This is physically a hugging in of all the muscles to bone. Not a clenching, just a nice "energetic hug". This engages all the muscles in the body. This is a "pulling in" so that there is something to stretch out. If your muscles are loose, you will not stretch anything.

 

Step Three is "Inner Spiral". This is something that works with the arms and the legs (mainly the legs...the arms get a bit specific as the rotation changes depending on whether your arms in above the shoulders or below the shoulders). This is basically a pulling back and out with the inner thighs. A good way to feel this is to go into Downward Dog, slightly bend the knees (the knees cannot be locked or Inner Spiral will not work) and pull the inseam of your pants back and away from the midline/centerline of the body. This, (especially in standing postures) will create an extra bit of curve in your lumbar spine...it will also slightly pull your toes inwards and your heels outwards....but only slightly. This creates space for:

 

Step Four: "Outer Spiral". While keeping Inner Spiral engaged, pull/tuck the tailbone down into the space created by Inner Spiral. This will balance out the slight outward movement of the heels and will straighen out the legs once again. It will also help to keep ALL the leg muscles fully engaged which is what makes every posture more doable (especially balancing postures including arm/forearm balances). You don't want to clench the buttocks in Outer Spiral though...if that happens you are doing it too much. Tuck the tailbone just enough to tone the buttocks but not clench them.

 

(It should be noted that not every posture will have an equal amount of Inner and Outer Spiral on each leg. For example: In Virabhadrasana II, Warrior two, with your right leg forward in a lunge position, you will want to do more inner spiral on your back leg (left), and more outer spiral on your front leg (right)...this will help to really open up the hips and make this posture as effective as possible. While in the lunge position for Warrior II, pull the inseam of your inner thighs back and away (mostly your left leg), creating extra curve in the lumbar spine and making you have to lean a little forward to keep your balance...then do lots of Outer Spiral on your right leg, tucking the tailbone down and squaring off the hips. (this will bring the torso back in line with the legs as it should be)

Doing this will give you an idea of what I am meaning in saying that there is not always an equal amount of Inner and Outer Spiral on each leg in every posture.)

 

Step Five is call "Organic Energy". This is the counter part to step 2 "Muscular Energy". Muscular energy is a hugging in, Organic Energy is a stretching out. This causes a deep stretch in every muscle (because they are all engaged). In Downward Dog this would be pressing all four corners of your hands and feet (well not all 4 corners of your feet, depending on your personal DD posture, but it is a pushing of the balls of your feet into the floor and pushing your heels down towards the floor) firmly into the floor. This is the stretch.

 

I have to run now, but if you have any more questions, I will check back in an hour or two before I leave work and try to answer them. Good luck and play safe ;)

 

Love,

Carson :D

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