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Rare Martial Arts (post them)

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This may have been covered before, but anyway...

 

What are some of the lesser known styles out there? From any part of the world.

 

I feel a connection to Kalaripayattu - an Indian style, supposedly one of the oldest that exists. One day, probably within half a decade, I shall go to India for a real taste of Kalaripayattu.

 

What've you got?

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"Yes, this is the DEADLIEST and most TERRIFYING fighting art known to man--and WITHOUT EQUAL. Its MAIMING, MUTILATING, DISFIGURING, PARALYZING and CRIPPLING techniques are known by only a few people in the world. An expert at DIM MAK could easily kill many Judo, Karate, Kung Fu, Aikido, and Gung Fu experts at one time with only finger-tip pressure using his murderous POISON HAND WEAPONS. Instructing you step by step thru each move in this manual is none other than COUNT DANTE--"THE DEADLIEST MAN WHO EVER LIVED." (THE CROWN PRINCE OF DEATH.)"

 

:)

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When someone uses Count Dante's secret techniques in a fight,

only one person walks away!*

*usually not the Count Dante practitioner :)

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Robert Rankin has a running gag about 'dimmac' martial art in his ' Brentford Trilogy' books.

Well worth checking out if you like laughing.

Edited by GrandmasterP

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I havent heard of dim mac for years :)

 

There is a RAD Kalaripayattu demo ( except I cant seem to find it today) where a blindfolded guy dances around another who is lying down, the first chops around his body (close) with a hoe then at the end cuts something in half on his stomach. It looks like an older film.

 

My style is unusual or rare, considering its traditions and 'founding' ( see Wiki articles on Bushi Matsamura, Kobe Matsamarua, Hohan Soken ).

 

Some forms of Kobudu seem rare or unusual to some.

 

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The art may not be rare, but the artist's age may well be...

 

 

...although there is suspicion he wasn't 118 when that vid was made.

There is another clip showing him giving a short demo at the age of

117. In that one he looked quite a bit older, and slightly slower too.

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What's the Tibetan martial art? It is full of deadly strikes and stuff....i can't remember....

everyone who studies it to completion apparently has some tattoo... haha (like an anime)

Edited by MooNiNite

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What's the Tibetan martial art? It is full of deadly strikes and stuff....i can't remember....

 

 

 

 

 

devil.gif

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Not everything presented as Dim Mak or Kyusho-jitsu is BS. The following is a compilation from one of Evan Pantazi's DVDs. Here he interprets the classical martial arts text Bubishi.

 

Edited by Michael Sternbach
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Where would we be without black polo shirts complete with a big dojo badge embroidered thereon?

I wear one when teaching and I'd bet most folks either do or have done too.

 

:)

Edited by GrandmasterP

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A good friend of mine is the 10th dan lineage holder of a little-known South American martial combat system called Muaykensan. Raul Sanhueza's his name. You can find his demos on FB as well as YT.

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A good friend of mine is the 10th dan lineage holder of a little-known South American martial combat system called Muaykensan. Raul Sanhueza's his name. You can find his demos on FB as well as YT.

 

I am not trying to be a troll, or bait you about your friend, or be divisive for the sake of scoring some imaginary points. Still, Muaykensan is American Kempo under another label. I'm sure he could argue that he has "introduced new elements so that it is a different thing." Even so, it might not be Coke but its still Cola.

 

Back on to topic. I saw an old Daoist monk on 青成山Qingchengshan who did some kind of crazy Tiger style with full on hissing and growling. It definitely was NOT Shaolin based, and he underwent a chilling kind of shamanic transformation when he ripped out his form. It gave me goosebumps and I never saw anything like it ever again.

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I am not trying to be a troll, or bait you about your friend, or be divisive for the sake of scoring some imaginary points. Still, Muaykensan is American Kempo under another label. I'm sure he could argue that he has "introduced new elements so that it is a different thing." Even so, it might not be Coke but its still Cola.

You might be right, but then, maybe not... he tells me the system is a conglomeration of various arts his father had put together, transmitted to him, and now, from him to his son. Who am i to argue, eh?

 

I don't believe i was off-topic at all.

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Oh no, sorry, that was not about YOU being off topic, it was ME who was off topic.

Ok, no worries, Kevin. You were not off-topic. Its great you offered your thoughts on it. :)

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Not forgetting ' Ecky Thump' that old MA from the north country here in England.

Ecky Thump dojo 'school' clip here...

Edited by GrandmasterP
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I saw an old Korean tiger style performed once by the fellow who intro'd me to bagua. In his words it was 'proto-internal' and that the primary strategy was point grabbing and compression. Pretty intense but he refused to teach the entire system so I wasn't really interested in spending the time with it.

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Anyone heard of or familiar with a Filipino martial arts called Sayoc Kali? Lethal knife moves.

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You might be right, but then, maybe not... he tells me the system is a conglomeration of various arts his father had put together, transmitted to him, and now, from him to his son.

 

I found him interesting ; he follows some principles and moves that look familiar to me ( aside from the obvious 'practicality' its more the 'application style') ; instantly taking or forcing the rear 45 deg, blind sides, the little 'double jump kick' for some low kicks, 'opportunism' and flow, the 'natural style' ( multiple movements within what others might see as a 'load up' - and the complex bunkai within form moves ( that are not normally understood in many types of 'karate' ), many of the takedowns, etc. I found my previous Aikido very helpful to study the style I did and the style when introduced into aikido was devastating (although the instructor said that wasnt the way to do aikido - too ' viscous' or something ... but then some seniors turned up at his club, including his old instructor and a well known and highly respected senior - all from the same style - were doing it too - we must be 'old school' :D .... but no kicks ... 'Aikido does not kick' <shrug> )

 

It could be my imagination or wishful thinking, but it seems reminiscent of Mr. Nishihira's form , in some ways, which was taught to him by Hohan Soken (mentioned above) . What makes Soken style different ( and especially in the past, there seems more of this out there now) is that he left Okinawa before WW II and what happened back at home that influenced and changed karate did not influence him, so he had an 'older and unique' version (some thought) than the beast that emerged via JKA (based on the 'deity' Funakoshi ); loss of teachers and traditions due to the devastation in Okinawa, the resultant victorious service men wanting to be taught martial arts by their defeated enemies and the dynamic that resulted in , the transportation to Japan ( Funakoshi again) as a primary school PE system ( and how that changed it) and then being turned into a sport ( more changes, restrictions, adaptations, etc) .

 

When Hohan Soken returned to Okinawa he couldnt believe what had happened to the art and what people were learning and teaching.

 

The thing is, when he left Okinawa he went to Argentina, and I have often wondered what developed from that. I havent found out much yet, it seems hard to find, at some stage I will look deeper. But I have always wondered what, if any, influence it had in South American MAs.

 

It would be interesting to track your friends teachers and styles back and see where he adapted from.

 

Then again, those moves and ways of applying them are also , in a way , perfectly natural and common sense ( well, from a certain perspective and mind set ) so actually, I am surprised there is not more of that ( and less of the 'lunacy' ) .

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Anyone heard of or familiar with a Filipino martial arts called Sayoc Kali? Lethal knife moves.

 

IMO Philipino + knife = run

 

Man ... some of those old guys and their knife drills ! Dont know what 'style' they were but they were cleaning up these younger guys ( that looked like mean and quick and muscled - and had real knife scars on the faces and arms :wacko: ) rather jovially, the younger ones were looking really pissed and angry ... but hey, what could they do about it.

 

From my Dan Inasanto book (signed by him :) ) ; a section on how good the Filipino arts are - we killed Magellan :D and a great section on the old masters , some wonderful stories in there. I liked the way the old men dealt with unruly youth and the 'kid street gangs' (more like the nasty lookers I described above) - they would stroll around town with their stick and if they saw boys being naughty they would smack them and send them home to their mothers. :) One of them was invited on national TV. There was a big interest as it was bringing their art to reputable wider attention ... except at the last moment the master had disappeared. The interview was put on hold and they started searching the studio for him. he had wandered outside and and a tourist had asked him directions and he was helping them onto the right bus, he insisted that everyone wait until the 'visitors to our country' were safely on their way. The he went in for the interview.

Edited by Nungali
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