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This just happened a couple of days back in Connemara, Ireland. About an hour's drive from where I live. So sad. Not only the beautiful trees, but countless young (and old) wildlife must have perished.  :(

 

http://www.southeastradio.ie/2017/05/firefighters-fighting-massive-forest-fire-in-connemara/

 

 

pics of Connemara: 

 

https://www.google.ie/search?q=connemara&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiC3KPunejTAhXhJcAKHVCgDpAQ_AUICigB&biw=1279&bih=606

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Replanting trees can be hit and miss about a third perish.

IMG_5645.thumb.JPG.3ee5054073a94439e41de813eb60b8ec.JPG

 

post-112539-0-87138000-1494583442_thumb.jpgpost-112539-0-87138000-1494583442_thumb.jpgpost-112539-0-10435400-1494583579_thumb.jpg

 

These a few we planted about two years ago.

 

post-112539-0-10435400-1494583579_thumb.jpg

 

This getting big manna gum is the sole survivor of twenty trees planted.

See the old cart in the mud.

Edited by AussieTrees
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IMG_4681.thumb.JPG.e291b416cd32a315e43c2ea3286fdd50.JPGIMG_4678.thumb.JPG.efc077c3f20ccc5f8e1e30d22c5f5f4a.JPGIMG_5629.thumb.JPG.be30527d23588483997189592c36018e.JPGAt first it was the swans that kept pulling up the tree tubes soon after planting,then soon after replanting we had a lot of water similar to what happened last winter that killed off the other trees.

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On 5/12/2017 at 5:11 AM, AussieTrees said:

Replanting trees can be hit and miss about a third perish.

This getting big manna gum is the sole survivor of twenty trees planted.

Well, that's why I feel it's so devastating when even just 1 healthy tree, much less a whole old growth forest, gets cut down.

 

Because look at how long and against what odds it took for even just 1 tree to grow out in the wild?

First its parent tree had to reach maturity to produce seeds.

Then, one of those seeds had to implant into soil fertile enough to grow.

It had to germinate and sprout.

Become a seedling.

And at these early stages, it is still very fragile and subject to various threats..

To even survive this far, is not easy!

Only if it does, does it slowly becomes a young sapling, sturdier, and more established.

And after that point, it still takes decades and centuries to keep growing larger and larger...

Nothing but rings and rings of TIME!

 

Many, many trees never make it this far.

 

So, when you cut down a desirable (noninvasive), healthy, mature tree - it's like gunning down someone who just won an ultramarathon.  But one that took decades or centuries!

 

That represents a huge loss in history and something that would take decades to replace, at the least.  And even then, it still wouldn't be the same... :(

Edited by gendao
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On 01.05.2017 at 5:33 PM, cheya said:

Check out this fascinating and beautiful review of Peter Wohlleben's book!

Just the review is amazing! Can't wait to read the book!

 

The Secret Life of Trees: The Astonishing Science of What Trees Feel and How They Communicate

https://www.brainpickings.org/2016/09/26/the-hidden-life-of-trees-peter-wohlleben/

 

I have not heard of this book before. Going to read it, thank you!

I read a similar named old book about plants. 

It called

The Secret Life of Plants: A Fascinating Account of the Physical, Emotional and Spiritual Relations Between Plants and Man by Peter Tompkins, Christopher Bird
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/99442.The_Secret_Life_of_Plants

 

It certainly has contentious information.
But overall I liked it. Especially the head of George Washington Carver and the head  "Plant Alchemists".

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On 5/2/2017 at 0:33 AM, cheya said:

Check out this fascinating and beautiful review of Peter Wohlleben's book!

Just the review is amazing! Can't wait to read the book!

 

The Secret Life of Trees: The Astonishing Science of What Trees Feel and How They Communicate

https://www.brainpickings.org/2016/09/26/the-hidden-life-of-trees-peter-wohlleben/

 

Thanks for the reference, Cheya. It’s an excellent review. I’ve only just now read the review and recently read this awesome book.

 

As far as I know, the author, Peter Wohlleben, knows nothing of classical Daoism, yet relevant insights are woven seamlessly throughout his narrative. He slowly came to these views simply by observing forests, especially the one he manages, over many, many years. And I don’t mean cool, detached observation; his learning arose through empathy and deep respect for the intelligence, wisdom and mystery of trees as complex, feeling beings. He was taught by nature, just like those ancient Daoists.  

 

Here’s an excerpt that wasn’t quoted in the review – but really, only reading the whole book can do it justice……

 

“So, let's get back to why the roots are the most important part of a tree. Conceivably, this is where the tree equivalent of a brain is located. Brain? you ask. Isn't that a bit farfetched? Possibly, but now we know that trees can learn. This means they must store experiences somewhere, and therefore, there must be some kind of a storage mechanism inside the organism. Just where it is, no one knows, but the roots are the part of the tree best suited to the task. The old spruce in Sweden [referred to in previous paragraphs, whose still living roots have been carbon 14 dated to an astonishing 9,550 years old] also shows that what grows underground is the most permanent part of the tree—and where else would it store important information over a long period of time? Moreover, current research shows that a tree's delicate root network is full of surprises.

 

It is now an accepted fact that the root network is in charge of all chemical activity in the tree. And there's nothing earth shattering about that. Many of our internal processes are also regulated by chemical messengers. Roots absorb substances and bring them into the tree. In the other direction, they deliver the products of photosynthesis to the tree's fungal partners and even route warning signals to neighboring trees. But a brain? For there to be something we would recognize as a brain, neurological processes must be involved, and for these, in addition to chemical messages, you need electrical impulses. And these are precisely what we can measure in the tree, and we've been able to do so since as far back as the nineteenth century. For some years now, a heated controversy has flared up among scientists. Can plants think? Are they intelligent?

 

In conjunction with his colleagues, Frantisek Baluska from the Institute of Cellular and Molecular Botany at the University of Bonn is of the opinion that brain-like structures can be found at root tips. In addition to signaling pathways, there are also numerous systems and molecules similar to those found in animals. When a root feels its way forward in the ground, it is aware of stimuli. The researchers measured electrical signals that led to changes in behavior after they were processed in a "transition zone." If the root encounters toxic substances, impenetrable stones, or saturated soil, it analyzes the situation and transmits the necessary adjustments to the growing tip. The root tip changes direction as a result of this communication and steers the growing root around the critical areas.

 

Right now, the majority of plant researchers are skeptical about whether such behavior points to a repository for intelligence, the faculty of memory, and emotions. Among other things, they get worked up about carrying over findings in similar situations with animals and, at the end of the day, about how this threatens to blur the boundary between plants and animals. And so what? What would be so awful about that? The distinction between plant and animal is, after all, arbitrary and depends on the way an organism feeds itself: the former photosynthesizes and the latter eats other living beings. Finally, the only other big difference is in the amount of time it takes to process information and translate it into action. Does that mean that beings that live life in the slow lane are automatically worth less than ones on the fast track? Sometimes I suspect we would pay more attention to trees and other vegetation if we could establish beyond a doubt just how similar they are in many ways to animals.”

 

(From Peter Wohlleben, The Hidden Life of Trees, pp82-4)

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I remembered in the last post about George Washington Carver.
I often remind the story of him as an example of how a person with an open heart can achieve a deep understanding of nature and interact with the outside world. 

 

From book Secret LIve Of Trees by Peter Tompkins and Christopher Bird:

"From the time he was able to get about by himself in the countryside young Carver began to display an uncanny knowledge of all growing things. Local farmers in Diamond Grove, a tiny community in the foothills of the Ozarks in southwestern Missouri, remembered the weaklooking boy roving for hours through their holdings, examining plants and bringing back certain varieties with which he could miraculously heal sick animals. On his own, the child planted a private garden in a remote and unused bit of bottomland. With the remnants of coldframes and other stray material he built a secret greenhouse in the woods. Asked what he was forever doing all by himself so far from the farmyard, Carver replied firmly if enigmatically, "I go to my garden hospital and take care of hundreds of sick plants." Farmers' wives from all over the countryside began bringing him their ailing house plants, begging him to make them bloom. Gently caring for them in his own way, Carver often sang to them in the same squeaky voice which characterized him in manhood, put them in tin cans with special soil of his own concoction, tenderly covered them at night, and took them out to "play in the sun" during the day. When he returned the plants to their owners, and repeatedly was asked how he could work his miracles, Carver only said softly: "All flowers talk to me and so do hundreds of little living things in the woods. I learn what I know by watching and loving everything."

 

And one else: 

"Carver's students were greatly impressed that each morning he would rise at four 0' clock to walk in the woods before the start of the working day and bring back countless plants with which to illustrate his lectures. Explaining this habit to friends, Carver said, "Nature is the greatest teacher and I learn from her best when others are asleep. In the still dark hours before sunrise God tells me of the plans I am to fulfill."

 

 

Edited by Pavel Karavaev
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Carver’s method (above), and Peter Wohlleben’s both show great sensitivity to the natural world, yet they also demonstrate fundamentally different approaches. I called Wolleben’s Daoist because an underlying theme of his is that, left to its own devices, the forest takes care of its self ‘self-so’ (ziran).  His attitude to managing the forest is characterised by minimal intervention, by non-doing (wu wei), because he realised that nature is far greater and wiser than us humans.

 

By way of contrast, from the above excerpt, I’d call Carver’s approach truly Christian.  His is an interventionist approach that puts us humans in a central role as carers and healers. His attitude is centred on compassion. 

 

(I present these two attitudes side by side merely by way of comparison. I’m not claiming one is better than the other – indeed, in my own life as a manager of a small private wilderness sanctuary, I practice both. But my natural inclination is towards the Daoist approach.) 
 

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8 hours ago, Yueya said:

(I present these two attitudes side by side merely by way of comparison. I’m not claiming one is better than the other – indeed, in my own life as a manager of a small private wilderness sanctuary, I practice both. But my natural inclination is towards the Daoist approach.) 

 

Dear Yueya, thank You for your answer.
Yes, I agree with everything you said about Carver. And about Wolleben, I still know about him only from this topic. For me it is a good introduction, and I looking forward to read the book.

 

Thank You once again.

 

Sinserely, Pavel.

Edited by Pavel Karavaev
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I have a signature quote on another forum for 15 years now that says,

"If you love anything enough, it will talk with you." - George Washington Carver

 

The Secret Life of Plants really affected me a lot when I was younger.

 

Cleve Backster's experiments with polygraph and plants I find fascinating also.

 

Some little books like Behaving as if the God in All Life Matters and The Perelandra Garden Workbook I rather enjoyed about 20 years ago when I first moved to this house.

 

Had an interesting experience with the 'nature spirits' when rearranging a room that I still find difficult to believe. I've had a couple experiences where I was forced to experience and realize that 'space' is as subjective as 'time' which is... mind boggling.

 

I once fell in love with a tree. I'd had a kundalini experience not long before and from heart to crown was rather overstimulated at the time which is probably why. I used to look around furtively and hug her and tell her how beautiful she was. I mourned having to move away from her!

 

On that awesome Ayu... um, drug post that Taomeow posted (sorry it's on another page so I can't look up the spelling for either of those words) -- that was a really awesome description.

 

It's kind of funny, because I had a dream that was so odd once but that kind of tied into the total life in the earth (not just plants) and your detail really reminded me of it. Also, I wrote a beginner novel (never published, many many years ago, but I might stick it on amazon kindle for the heck of it this year) -- paranormal, it's silly in parts -- but that has a... being/creature and an experience that is very like that, which I thought at the time I might have gotten from the dream.

 

But hearing you describe that I suspect that is just the way it is. Lovely, thanks for sharing that.

 

RC

 

Edited by redcairo
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This is akin to how it feels when my awareness is co=opted utterly by the presence of some magnificent trees.

I gasp audibly, sometimes stunning and alerting folks I'm walking with not accustomed to me. 

 

It's not a passive thing... it's visceral.  active.  and soooo deeply appreciated.

 

arthurrackham_grimm5.jpg?resize=768,960&

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