Aetherous

Cooking up a storm

71 posts in this topic

Due to the health benefits of real sourdough compared to regular bread, I've been working on a starter. I previously tried to make it with wild yeast (just flour and water in a jar), but it had an off kind of smell to it. I will keep trying. Regardless, the starter I'm using now smells how it should, but isn't nearly as bubbly...so I'm not sure if I can recommend this hyperlinked brand of dehydrated starter.

I think the moral here is, if you know someone who makes their own sourdough, ask for some of their starter because it'll save you a huge hassle. It's been at least a month and a half of trying.

Anyway, today I made whole wheat sourdough pancakes for the first time. I'm not at all a pancake fan. I hate them with a passion! But I actually enjoyed these...and afterward, I felt more alive (similar to after eating really fresh sashimi) and wasn't hungry again for hours.

Sourdough pancakes: a really good thing to do seeing as how inexpensive, healthy, and easy it is (once you have a starter).

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I've heard adding a light ale (even cheapo Bud) to a dough gives it a nice (and fast) sour dough taste.

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Cool recipe magazine for bread baking- Grit Country Skill Series 'Guide to Homemade Bread' (Vol. 5), put out by Mother Earth News. Page 34, Salute to Sourdough. Great recipes, very conversational style and most are easy No-Knead types.

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Made lunch yesterday for potential backer of one of my projects ( alchemical / agricultural) so I thought to use local produce; much potato growing, trout hatchery, old wood fired oven bakery in town and the veggie garden.

 

Lunch was ;

Smoked trout and leek puff pastry parcels (with a tad of cream cheese and caper and horseradish cream on top)

Rocket, fresh pear slices and walnut salad with vinaigrette

Potato salad with garden herbs, egg and mayo.

Big chunky cob of sesame seed covered bread and butter.

 

He is on board now ^_^ and prepared to buy the microscope (so I can get pics of the teeeeeenie little bugs living inside the preparations).

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Here's something most of you guys/gals may never have sampled -- a Kyrgyz traditional dish called dymlyama. The instructions in the video are in Russian but everything that's used and done is shown clearly so you can replicate it. The meat in this recipe is lamb, but I made it with all kinds and it works with anything, even turkey, provided you have some animal source fat on the bottom so nothing burns. (I ask the butchers at the local HFS for fat trimmings, they usually have them on hand and give them to me for free. I keep these in the freezer and use as needed.) Of course lamb is your first choice. The spices used are any "oriental" blend you know and like, e.g. you can use curry powder or garam masala powder, plus extra black pepper. You sprinkle spices and salt over each layer, a little at a time. The towel to wrap over the lid should be wet (not dripping wet though). (Fire hazard, be careful, don't set it on fire. Don't use it if in doubt.) Cook on low for 1 1/2 to 2 hours, depending on the size of your wok and the amount of ingredients. A large heavy cast iron pot will work if you don't have a wok (which ideally should be of cast iron too). I haven't tried it in any lightweight cookware, and recommend having something of cast iron on hand for any and all dishes you don't want to monitor too closely, or to damage by uneven heat.

 

Edited by Taomeow
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I make sourdough waffles all the time. I keep my starter more runny, like the consistency of pancake or waffle batter. Then I just take some starter, and a pinch of salt, sugar, and baking soda, and an egg. Perfect every time, and much more flavorful than non sourdough. In summer I top with fresh fruit, and in winter maple syrup.

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timely revival, RV  :)

 

a dish i really like to prep and eat at home. So simple & delish!!!! And easy enough to get creative with too - some like to add cashewnuts into it, or some cut red chillies, which i normally toss into mine just to lift the taste a notch. As with most of my dishes, i tend to drizzle a few drops of good quality sesame oil just before plating. For vegetarians, maybe try with some fried tofu strips, fresh baby corn, and sliced shiitake! Enjoy!! 

 

Edited by C T
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Recently got a komo grain mill, which are expensive machines but much better than the other mill I had earlier in the thread. So I grind up organic white winter whole wheat. Here is a basic bread recipe that tends to work for me, which was really challenging to figure out...

4 cups of fresh milled whole wheat flour (red winter wheat will provide a better rise, which you will definitely want...whole wheat is heavier and therefore has a harder time rising)
2.5 teaspoons of salt

...whisk salt into the flour

 

1 teaspoon active dry yeast
1 tablespoon white sugar

1 cup of 110 degree Fahrenheit water

...whisk together in a separate bowl or cup and let sit for 5-10 minutes to proof

combine yeast-sugar-water into bowl of salt-flour, and add small amounts of water and mix it in, until it's a pretty damn wet consistency (whole wheat flour needs much more moisture than normal recipes). If I'm being lazy, I just make it pretty soupy so that it's all actually like a liquid that can be poured. Other times, I get a really really wet yet not liquidy version. Eventually I'll get a kitchen scale and figure out the correct percentage of water to use...as well as use a banneton coated with rice flour, which can help with high moisture doughs by causing the top/outside to dry faster while rising.

Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let sit for 12-18 hours. The small amount of yeast is because of this long rise (leaves more sugars for the yeast to consume...if there is more yeast, the sugars will be gone then the yeast will stop the rising). This step makes it like a fake sourdough, by doing a long soak, in terms of transforming the phytic acid so as to make the bread more nutritious and digestible. Freshly ground grains can have more phytase, which will further help break down the phytic acid. Perhaps I will also mill some rye berries, since that's the grain with the most phytase...and just add a small amount of that into the recipe to give a further boost to the phytic acid breakdown.

After the rising time is up, put it into a cast iron crockpot that's been in the oven while it was reaching the max temperature, lets say 475 degrees. It's been in there about 20-30 minutes. If the dough is all soupy, I just pour it into the hot crockpot. If I were using a banneton, I'd have parchment paper on top, then flip the banneton over and lift the parchment paper's edges, and lower it into the crockpot. Then cover it, and put it in the oven for 30 minutes.

The covered crockpot creates steam on the inside with the watery dough, which provides for a better rise by not drying out the crust first. After the 30 minutes is up, take a look at the crust. If it's darker, I do like 5 more minutes without the crockpot lid. If it's lighter tan on top, I do 10-15 more minutes without the lid. Make sure it doesn't burn, of course.

Then you have a pretty decent round loaf of 100% whole wheat. Take it out of the crockpot and let it cool on a cooling rack. Be sure to wait at least as long as it took to bake it, before slicing into it. Patience. Also be sure to try it right away after that, with butter...because it will be good for your soul.

Using the banneton...then getting into issues of scoring the loaf correctly with a razor to help with the rise...measuring ingredients with the kitchen scale to get precise measurements...getting the timing just right depending on ambient temperature, so that the yeast is at its peak of activity, and will still rise in the oven...these are more challenging aspects, that can be worked on later.

Apart from those, what I've figured out is something that's definitely workable for a healthy bread...unlike most 100% whole wheat recipes. Comes out with good air pockets, tastes good, crispy crust.

 

This was the best resource I found on the subject of whole wheat breads.

Edited by Aetherous
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Almond maltose cookies

 

  • 2 cups almond flour
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder

 

whisk together in a bowl

  • 1/3 cup brown rice syrup
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract

 

stir everything with wooden spoon until totally combined

form into cookies any way you desire on a baking sheet

bake at 350 for 12 minutes

It's amazing how this recipe is so easy, with such atypical cookie ingredients, yet comes together to make a really decent treat. Brown rice syrup is called "yi tang" in Chinese Medicine, and is thought to be a sweetener that benefits the digestion (as opposed to regular sugar, which harms it). Although it benefits digestion, it does seem to produce "dampness"...so I might try adding cardamom.

Edited by Aetherous
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Back to aioli, after your mayo is done varieties are endless pesto, cajun, roasted garlic, cranberry. lemon.

 

All you have to do is pair it up say sauteed scallops over a bed of greens topped with lemon aioli and fresh parsley.  

 

Make a sandwich turkey lettuce apples and cheddar nice bread and but of course cranberry aioli.

 

Pizza pesto aioli, buffalo mozz, tomato, fresh basil ,maybe red onion or whatever you like 

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Make a sandwich turkey lettuce apples and cheddar nice bread and but of course cranberry aioli.

 

That sounds great.

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Easy healthy breakfast:
 

Put olive oil in a pan
chop up bell pepper and tomato

throw them in with a handful of baby spinach

cook for a bit
 

throw in the whites of three eggs

scramble all together until fully cooked

good quality salt and pepper in it to taste

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Easy healthy breakfast:

 

Put olive oil in a pan

chop up bell pepper and tomato

throw them in with a handful of baby spinach

cook for a bit

 

throw in the whites of three eggs

scramble all together until fully cooked

good quality salt and pepper in it to taste

sounds delicious! 

 

Try throwing in some chopped basil as well. Great for health and does wonders to lift the taste!  :)

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For lunch I had:

 

- some Kielbasa that was in my parents' house,

- eggs with onion, garlic, and mushrooms fried in coconut oil with some herbs like thyme and parsley

 

I don't eat meat often, so it was a nice treat. ^_^

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soups are always a great treat on a cold winter day.

 

one of my favorites in the past was Avgolemeno. Its a Greek soup.

 

Have not had it since moving away from a particular restaurant.

 

Decided to make it a few weeks ago.

 

its chicken broth base. I first cooked fresh chicken with celery, carrot and bay leaves, onion...then later strained it all out then add with lemon, egg and rice. sorta like greek chicken noodle soup.

very lemony and pretty tasty.

 

I am sure alterations are possible for vegetarians here. you could use vegetable broth instead and surely drop two eggs.

Edited by sagebrush
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soups are always a great treat on a cold winter day.

 

one of my favorites in the past was Avgolemeno. Its a Greek soup.

 

Have not had it since moving away from a particular restaurant.

 

Decided to make it a few weeks ago.

 

its chicken broth base. I first cooked fresh chicken with celery, carrot and bay leaves, onion...then later strained it all out then add with lemon, egg and rice. sorta like greek chicken noodle soup.

very lemony and pretty tasty.

 

I am sure alterations are possible for vegetarians here. you could use vegetable broth instead and surely drop two eggs.

 

You strain the chicken out, too?

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you can improvise and create and cook to suit your needs---

 

I strained it all and then put some chicken back in it---

 

I used the gathered strained ingredients and ate it later.

 

however if I make it again in regards to my mother-I would need to leave the chicken out. it is difficult to chew with denture the chicken

 

the traditional avgolemeno is that all ingredients are strained out----then toward the end of the cooking

you beat the egg until real foamy and temper it slowly with some of the hot soup or it gets funky.

then add it to the entire pot. it must be a thickening agent

 

the deal here is probably creating your own fresh chicken broth...best tasting of course

 

as opposed to being rushed for time and buying already prepared broth(even organic) from the store in paper cartons.

 

so decide what amount of time you want to spend in the kitchen

 

for me I pick the day that I feel like making the traditional recipe and spent the time to do so.....

 

made a mistake as well in buying a whole chicken(which the recipe called for) but my whole chicken was more weight than

the recipe called for so I began to just cut raw pieces off the whole bird...

I could have just had the pieces cut for me--- or buy just sections....

 

nonetheless the soup is really really good.

substitutes as well for rice, pasta, orzo... I just used basmati because I like rice the best.

Edited by sagebrush
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on the menu next is stuffed green peppers with quinoa, pine nuts, spinach and feta.....

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avgolemeno

 

1 whole chicken (3.5 lbs)

 

12 cups water

 

2 carrots cut in half

 

2 celery stalks cut in half

 

1 large onion peeled and cut in half

 

2 bay leaves

 

5 black peppercorns

 

2 tsp. salt

 

1/2 cup orzo pasta or rice

 

3 eggs at room temperature

 

1 tsp fresh lemon zest

 

juice of 2 lemons strained

 

-----------------------------------------

 

add first 8 ingredients to a large stock pot. bring to rapid boil, lower heat to medium low and simmer partially covered for 1-1 1/2 hours.

 

remove chicken and vegetables to a bowl-strain the broth fine seive

return strained broth to stockpot and bring to boil

 

add the orzo or rice and cook uncovered for 10-12 minutes

 

while the rice is cooking prepare the egg-lemon mixture.

 

using a whisk beat the egg until nice and frothy. add the lemon zest and lemon juice in a steady stream while continuing to whisk.

 

when the rice has finished cooking turn off the heat. ladle about 2 cups of broth into a bowl or large measuring cup.

slowly add the hot broth to the egg-lemon mixture while continuing to whisk. this will temper the eggs and prevent curdling once they are added to hot broth

stir the egg lemon mixture into the pot and heat over very low heat for approximately 5-10 minutes until headed through.

be careful not to boil the soup once the eggs have been added.

 

adjust your seasoning for salt and pepper. add more if desired

 

traditionally soup is served without the chicken or vegetables you can add them back or serve on the side.

 

for me-I added the chicken back because I like the protein.

and during the cooking after straining the vegetables I picked at the carrots.

 

the second day of this soup was all melded together and the taste was great.

lemon is very obvious

 

bon appetite

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