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Know of any good links to help in understanding or translating the TaoTeChing?

 

Post them here! We need all the help we can get! ^_^

 

PLEASE POST RESOURCES ONLY - COMMENTS CAN BE PLACED ON THE GENERAL DISCUSSIONS THREAD - THANK YOU.

 

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To get us started, here's a few offered by Stigweard. Thanks Stig!

Chinese Etymology Home Page

YellowBridge Chinese Language and Culture

Laozi Daodejing Siegelschrift - Sealscript 老子 道德經 篆書 - Laotse Taoteking <--that site is wonderful,btw.

Learn Chinese Characters

老 子「道 德 經」Tao Te Ching in Big 5

LaoTze DaoDeJing [Tao Te Ching] Chinese text

Roget's Thesaurus (1911) - The ARTFL Project

Thesaurus.com | Find Synonyms and Antonyms of Words at Thesaurus.com

Online Etymology Dictionary

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu [Dao De Jing by Lao Zi]

Terebess Asia Online - TAO <--that one, too

LaoTze - TaoDeJing

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu -- Ni Hua Ching

 

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edit: fix broken links

Edited by Apech
Edited at request of Twinner and others (Resources Only).
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More resources:

 

 

The Big View

 

pdf downloads of T. McCarrel and Feng/English translations.

 

 

Underdog Way

 

free pdf download of a compendium of translations (including Russian).

 

 

Translations

 

site with many translation in various languages (I posted this before).

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How to use the above translation tools

 

Let's take a complex character like De 德 found in Chapter 54.

 

Step 1: Open up these 2 sites:

 

http://www.yellowbridge.com/chinese/chinese-dictionary.php

 

http://www.internationalscientific.org/CharacterASP/EtymologyHome.aspx

 

In Yellowbridge paste the character into Chinese to English field and click Search. Then click on the Etymology tab.

 

In Chinese Etymology paste into the blank field and click the Etymology button.

 

Results:

 

In both Yellowbridge and Chinese Etymology we see that the character is a composite of the characters:

 

彳 + 悳

 

Step 2: Now repeat a search in each site using the composite characters (in Yellow bridge you can just <ctrl> left click on the character). Note down the meanings and the pictographic imagery. Make sure you bear in mind that some component parts of a character are use for phonetics whilst some for meaning.

 

Results:

 

The character 彳 is straightforward. Note down the meaning of this character.

 

Character: 彳

Pinyin: Chì

Pictograph: left half of a road intersection

Definition: step with left foot / left half or road

 

However 悳 is itself a composite of 直 + 心. So once again repeat searches using these components.

 

Character: 直

Pinyin: Zhí

Pictograph: the eye 目 which sees straight 十

Definition: straight, erect, vertical / continuous / uninterrupted

 

Character: 心

Pinyin: Xīn

Pictograph: Picture of a heart.

Definition: the heart / the mind / conscience / moral nature / intention / idea / intelligence / soul

 

Step 3: Now you can reassemble the character. Look at all the meanings and pictographic imagery to flesh out your understanding of the various implications and usage.

 

Character: 德

Pinyin: Dé

Pictograph: To walk a strait 悳 (virtuous) road 彳

Definition: Morality / decency / virtues / favor / kindness / behavior / conduct

 

Step 4: Always cross-reference with other resources. If the character is in the Daodejing then I always use these sites:

 

http://www.alice-dsl.net/taijiren/index.html

http://wengu.tartarie.com/wg/wengu.php?l=Daodejing

http://www.edepot.com/taoblank.html

http://wayist.org/ttc%20compared/indexchp.htm

 

If it not in the Daodejing I use these:

 

http://zhongwen.com/

http://www.nciku.com/

Edited by Stigweard
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Well, since this thread isn't entirely dead.

 

If you approach the DDJ you may be interested in Bradford Hatcher's matrix translation.

 

Also, you should at least have a background in Classical Chinese; this would make the process of translation quite more straight-forward, instead of a hit-and-miss combinatorial approach. For this, E. G. Pulleyblank's Outline of Classical Chinese Grammar tends to float around online and provides a sufficient (albeit not cutting edge) framework. Still, it's a long way ahead from the 'Chinese is just a bunch of ideograms thrown together for good measure', and quite helpful.

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Not sure if this is the right place to post it, but Andrew Nugent-Head sharing more of his awesomeness! :)

 

 

Dao de jing translation project.

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