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Robert Peng's Yi Jin Jing is in another league, compared to what you commonly see. His has the proper reverse abdominal breathing and levels of intensity that the others don't have. This is the only version that I have seen, that actually really applies the bone marrow washing and tendon changing classics of Bodhidharma (the way Dr. Yang Jwing-Ming teaches). His Shaolin Sifu taught him this version. The instruction is very detailed. I've only followed up to the first 4 forms to try it out. To give an example there is this form where you stand similar to "hugging the tree" standing meditation, then you relax a little in that posture with normal breathing and then you start doing reverse abdominal breathing and really push the air out or your lungs at exhale, while you push your arms away, back and forth, with three sets of intensity, every time tightening and relaxing the muscles, joints, fascia and organs (according to the specific form). After doing couple of rounds= buzzing all over arms, chest and lungs (this form is focused on strengthening the lungs). You also use some intension and imagination, like your really pushing against something heavy. This practice is supposed to make you stronger on many levels. It's a Shaolin foundation practice that is supposed to make weak monks, not so weak anymore. I don't like many of his practices, but this one is special.

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15 hours ago, dwai said:

I've read the book. It's good. He does cover the Yi Jin Jing in the book, but not the practice of the set of 12 "forms" per se. He treats Yi Jin Jing as a principle. So while it is illuminating, it still leaves an opening for a teacher to explain and correlate the practice with the "principle of Yi Jin Jing" as outlined in his book.

 

 

So, after reading it do you think you could apply the principles given to other forms. Does it provide "inside" information that you don't get from watching a YouTube video. It seems to me that without that inside information one is just flapping their arms around in the air. How is the Yi Jin Jing any more beneficial than doing burpees, push-ups, and planks?

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16 minutes ago, escott said:

 

So, after reading it do you think you could apply the principles given to other forms. Does it provide "inside" information that you don't get from watching a YouTube video. It seems to me that without that inside information one is just flapping their arms around in the air. How is the Yi Jin Jing any more beneficial than doing burpees, push-ups, and planks?

Since I'm a long time taijiquan practitioner, a lot of what he describes in the book is already how my body has become (a taiji body). So I just followed the instructions of the video, and I can feel the effects. 

 

I think having a background in one of the internal martial arts is important, and that will help you understand the yijinjing type practice, and validate that you are indeed feeling what you should be feeling. 

 

I'm not sure that I could even understand what he wrote about without already having experienced the phenomena first hand. It is for that reason that I find his books illuminating, as they provide some theory behind the direct experience based understanding  that I already have. I'm not sure someone with no background and hands on experience with qigong/neigong will be able to do more than get an academic understanding of the subject(s) from his books (if at all). There is also the risk of them misunderstanding (assuming/imagining) things too, if they try to follow along purely from an academic perspective. 

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On 7/6/2019 at 6:15 AM, Spotless said:

However - the location of Awareness is also taught to be in centeredness if not in the LDT to try and be in the Central Axis and this is often reminded. Awareness in the Center of Head vs forward in the head or outside of the head - or Awareness in the Middle Dan Tien or Lower dan tien - along the axis always so if one drifts up to the head - be in the middle of the head in the Axis or in the whole axis at the same moment - it depends on the student.

 

This rings very true, from my experience and is a wonderful description of the mechanics of true centered meditation. Embodied, and integrated. The energy is no longer floating (the key point), and the central channel helps for that. Another way to say what you wrote is the entire body becomes the lower Dantian. For me, I first tap into the lower Dantian, then this opens up a void where I can access the central channel. Then I just rest in that space from the center of the head to the LDT. I'm not sure I would say I box my awareness into that space, but I reside there.  The way I was taught is to merge my awareness with the wholeness of my body, evenly. That's why the phrasing "location of awareness" is a bit strong to me. We keep our awareness open, diffuse, and let it trickle down from the head to merge with the body, evenly, by itself.

 

Practically when I enter the central channel, I feel a kind of mist inside, or a steam of Qi, something buoyant that is radiating from the central channel and removing blockages as it expands to the rest of the body. Then I stay focused on the sense of wholeness in the body. This is what Master Ni Hua Ching refers to as "natural meditation". In his book Spring Thunder, the describes it as merging your "pure form" with your physical body. It does feel like we have an inner self in the body - to me it kind of feels like the central channel with limbs and a head, if that makes sense, haha.... So the way I view this is the "mechanics" part is residing along the axis, but the flowering of the meditation is the integration of awareness and body that ensues, naturally, without manipulation or engineering, as the Qi and awareness come down and diffuses naturally and evenly.

 

You have a great Master and it's incredible you can benefit from almost 1 on 1 instruction with him. It's also wonderful what he said about you...

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1 hour ago, Sebastian said:

 

This rings very true, from my experience and is a wonderful description of the mechanics of true centered meditation. Embodied, and integrated. The energy is no longer floating (the key point), and the central channel helps for that. Another way to say what you wrote is the entire body becomes the lower Dantian. For me, I first tap into the lower Dantian, then this opens up a void where I can access the central channel. Then I just rest in that space from the center of the head to the LDT. I'm not sure I would say I box my awareness into that space, but I reside there.  The way I was taught is to merge my awareness with the wholeness of my body, evenly. That's why the phrasing "location of awareness" is a bit strong to me. We keep our awareness open, diffuse, and let it trickle down from the head to merge with the body, evenly, by itself.

 

Practically when I enter the central channel, I feel a kind of mist inside, or a steam of Qi, something buoyant that is radiating from the central channel and removing blockages as it expands to the rest of the body. Then I stay focused on the sense of wholeness in the body. This is what Master Ni Hua Ching refers to as "natural meditation". In his book Spring Thunder, the describes it as merging your "pure form" with your physical body. It does feel like we have an inner self in the body - to me it kind of feels like the central channel with limbs and a head, if that makes sense, haha.... So the way I view this is the "mechanics" part is residing along the axis, but the flowering of the meditation is the integration of awareness and body that ensues, naturally, without manipulation or engineering, as the Qi and awareness come down and diffuses naturally and evenly.

 

You have a great Master and it's incredible you can benefit from almost 1 on 1 instruction with him. It's also wonderful what he said about you...

 

Not sure if it the same thing, but there is an instruction to recognize the awareness behind the eyes and then feel the awareness watching the whole body as yet another object, the same way as watching other objects that gives a nice effect and detachment. 

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1 hour ago, Sebastian said:

 

This rings very true, from my experience and is a wonderful description of the mechanics of true centered meditation. Embodied, and integrated. The energy is no longer floating (the key point), and the central channel helps for that. Another way to say what you wrote is the entire body becomes the lower Dantian. For me, I first tap into the lower Dantian, then this opens up a void where I can access the central channel. Then I just rest in that space from the center of the head to the LDT. I'm not sure I would say I box my awareness into that space, but I reside there.  The way I was taught is to merge my awareness with the wholeness of my body, evenly. That's why the phrasing "location of awareness" is a bit strong to me. We keep our awareness open, diffuse, and let it trickle down from the head to merge with the body, evenly, by itself.

 

Practically when I enter the central channel, I feel a kind of mist inside, or a steam of Qi, something buoyant that is radiating from the central channel and removing blockages as it expands to the rest of the body. Then I stay focused on the sense of wholeness in the body. This is what Master Ni Hua Ching refers to as "natural meditation". In his book Spring Thunder, the describes it as merging your "pure form" with your physical body. It does feel like we have an inner self in the body - to me it kind of feels like the central channel with limbs and a head, if that makes sense, haha.... So the way I view this is the "mechanics" part is residing along the axis, but the flowering of the meditation is the integration of awareness and body that ensues, naturally, without manipulation or engineering, as the Qi and awareness come down and diffuses naturally and evenly.

 

You have a great Master and it's incredible you can benefit from almost 1 on 1 instruction with him. It's also wonderful what he said about you...

The teaching regarding the central axis and so forth is from my own inner experience and from the energies themselves. It was not taught to me by my master nor something I read or heard - it is what one comes to know and what has emerged in what I teach.

 

What you have discribed in the initial stages becomes many fold stronger.

 

It becomes the full trunk - residing in centeredness was not meant to imply a rigidizing of Awareness - within the subtle bodies it is the axel core axis - the “subtle bodies” become far more prominent than the  

gross physical and centeredness is implied within its matrix.

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It is experiential for me too, but I didn't get there on my own efforts like you. For me it was an experience revealed by my Master, through some careful verbal cues when looking at the LDT one day. It was a bit like magic, he was saying things and they were becoming true, energetically, one at a time. The LDT opened up a void (behind the navel) and a very pure Qi that feels unsubstantial sprang forth from it, almost feeling like Light. Then this Pure Qi travels through the central channel and then the rest of body. We only had to do this once, and now I can access this space you are referring too, effortlessly. But it is in the early stages as you said and I'm still coming to grasp with what this is... thanks for your words. It's true the physical seems to disappear, relative to the energetic. At that point it feels like the energetic is "wearing" the physical like an article of clothing, if that makes sense. I'll keep playing with it.

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By the way, JohnDoe2012, your sound very familiar......  Didn't you go to Virginia Tech with my cousin InsertSurname2019 ?

 

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On 7/13/2019 at 4:45 PM, Sebastian said:

By the way, JohnDoe2012, your sound very familiar......  Didn't you go to Virginia Tech with my cousin InsertSurname2019 ?

 

 

I am famous for playing the corpse in American TV series ('hey we got a John Doe here') :) but never been to Virginia Tech before :)

 

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1 hour ago, johndoe2012 said:

 

I am famous for playing the corpse in American TV series ('hey we got a John Doe here')

 

Haha ok.... Takes some acting skill to be a good corpse for sure. I'm sure you where in some famous series too... Respect. I think I see who you are now (with this added information). Thanks

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