escott

The Dao Bums
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About escott

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  1. Philip K. Dick Tarot Cards

    I honestly don't do Tarot, but this came up in my news feed. It might be time to start. I've always been fascinated by Philip K. Dick and Blade Runner is my favorite movie. I wanted to share this, because if enough people sign up on the website they will do another issue as the original batch has sold out. Review: http://www.openculture.com/2019/08/philip-k-dick-tarot-cards.html Ordering Info: https://wide-books.com/pkd-tarot-the-fools-journey-of-philip-k-dick.html
  2. Developmental Trauma Disorder (DTD)

    He did Karate when he was 5-6 years old. He learned his katas pretty well then he got to where he didn't want to do it anymore - wouldn't put on his uniform, wouldn't go out on the floor at the studio. I've done some Qigong with him, basic arm circling stuff and imagining moving chi with his hands. He liked it. He's also had several years of occupational therapy.
  3. Developmental Trauma Disorder (DTD)

    I follow this sequence: https://theassmovement.wordpress.com/2015/10/11/shake-shake-shake-out-the-trauma/ And I watched some YouTube videos to see the exercises done. I get the most trembling doing the back bends and on the next-to-last movement when I'm arched. In the very last position I find that I have to raise and lower my legs several times to get them to shake. I hold the wall sit for 5 minutes, it makes me want to puke. I do this 2 or 3 times per week before bed. It takes me a while because I try to experience some trembling for a significant period of time, then I just lay flat on the floor and zone out. I've been watching 'One Strange Rock' on Netflix while I do it...
  4. Developmental Trauma Disorder (DTD)

    Does anyone here have any experience with Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)? I watched this awesome talk by Bessel Van Der Kolk where he talks about its effectiveness. https://youtu.be/53RX2ESIqsM I read up a little more on EMDR and the principle behind it reminds me of the cross-body exercises that I would have my son (who has Level 1 Autism) do when he was having a meltdown. First, I would have him high step touching opposite elbow to knees. Then, I would have him cross his hands at the wrist and interlace his fingers then draw his hands in and up to his chest and stand with one leg over the other crossed at the ankles. Then, I would have him sit on the floor cross legged and put opposite hands on knees. He would be calm within about 5 minutes and we could then have a rational discussion about why he was so agitated. I learned about these 'crossing the midline' exercises from a book called 'Smart Moves: Why Learning Is Not All In Your Head' by Carla Hannaford. These exercises come from something called 'Brain Gym'.
  5. What We Think We Know

    What do we know? - Emoji's mean different things to different people. Reminds me of asking 10 witnesses to an event to describe what they saw and getting 10 versions. What do we know...?
  6. Developmental Trauma Disorder (DTD)

    Have you ever done 'Trauma Release Exercises'? I've recently started doing them a few times per week and am hoping they offer some relief.
  7. What We Think We Know

    Imagine being confronted with the revelation that you are a psychopath. If you have 13 minutes I highly recommend you listen to Dr. James Fallon's story about his discovery of learning that he is a psychopath. Talk about gaining some perspective into one's own nature...
  8. Open Invitation

    I'm here. Who am I? Just a dude playin' a dude...
  9. What We Think We Know

    Some interesting stuff here, souls, infinity, eternity... I'll admit I've had some religious experiences in my life that seemed like the voice of God and the infiltration of my mind by demons. Those perceptions were a result of the worldview or model of reality that I held at the time. Now, I'm not really sure how to categorize those experiences. My world of beliefs was destroyed 31 years ago. I explored many systems since then and even tried to return to my original world only to walk away from it again. What strange animals we are. We think our life needs a reason or a purpose. It doesn't. Out my back door I watch deer, turkeys, hawks, groundhogs, foxes, and I hear coyotes at night. I have a dog in my house, too. Do they need a purpose or reason to live? What makes me so different? Am I created in the image of God? Where did that idea come from? What do I know? The only thing I can say with any certainty is that I am alive, I'm here. Anything that I may think about the world I experience is questionable. It is dependent on my ability to sense and perceive and limited by my knowledge and ability to process information. The only thing for certain is that I AM. Something i have recently found that gives me comfort is when i remind myself that, "I Am NOW." Because, NOW is all there really is. I guess that is what mindfulness is, when I pause to see the sunlight shimmer through the leaves, when I focus on the flavor of the food in my mouth, when I gaze into the eyes of my sons or wife, or when i just look around the room that I am sitting in and I forget all my memories and I stop obsessing about the future. I am here right now, that's all I know.
  10. Neanderthal Diet/Human Protein Max

    So are you saying it's more healthy to eat meat with a high fat content?
  11. What We Think We Know

    The key phrase here concerning the situation in the U.S. is "perception of scarcity". In this case it is Jobs. One group is being convinced that the other group is taking their jobs, their money, and their opportunity for a prosperous future.
  12. Interesting overall, but one little tidbit jumped out at me: We modern humans can only tolerate about 35 percent of lean protein in our diets before our kidneys start to suffer. https://www.sapiens.org/column/field-trips/neanderthal-diet/
  13. What We Think We Know

    I think the main driver, not just now but also in the past, is Scarcity (or at least, the perception of it). When people start believing that there is not enough to go around they get scared and start choosing sides and forming allegiances. Given that there are 7.7 billion people on this planet and still increasing this may be a correct assumption. Or is it? Maybe our real problem is that we just can't agree on a solution and are, therefore, victims of mismanagement. Why can't we agree on a solution to our problems? Fear of scarcity, again. Fear that one side will win and the other side will lose (a zero sum game). But, to get more back on topic, what is the world teaching us right now? It's teaching us that psychopaths win the game! Is this new? I don't think so. Sometimes i wish i could be a psychopath, but I can't, for some reason I care about people and don't want to hurt anyone. I feel sad when I see people suffering. I want to help. But how do we really know what we know? Remember that old Eddie Murphy movie, 'Trading Places'? The bet was whether genetics or environment determined if a person would be successful. In fact, it's both. We are all born with a base configuration and set of abilities. After that, we process our experiences using the physical structure we were given. Things that effect us in a highly emotional way get weighted more significantly in how we evaluate future situations. Over time our thinking takes shortcuts to save time and we function on autopilot using this "internal operating system". I've had to think about this a lot as I have a child on the Autism spectrum with sensory processing issues. I ask, "how does he see the world?" He does not perceive the world the way a "normal" person (if there is such a thing) sees the world.
  14. What We Think We Know

    I learned something from the article concerning the difference between Echo Chambers and Epistemic Bubbles. But, I'm not sure if I'm satisfied with the author's solution to rescuing people from Echo Chambers. It reminds me too much of Nietzsche's declaration of "God is Dead." Nietzsche did not celebrate this conclusion, rather he was concerned that one's loss of worldview would lead to nihilism and despair. For someone to throw away everything they believe and to build it back up again is dangerous, many do not survive the process. It is not easy as I have been going through it myself for many years. As Nietzsche predicted, i fell into nihilism and depression. The good news is that i was able to pull out of my nosedive and I have The Dao Bums to thank for some of that. For Reference: https://bigthink.com/scotty-hendricks/what-nietzsche-really-meant-by-god-is-dead In regard to the original question, I can only say that "I am that I am and/or I will be what I will be." Regardless of what we think we really have no control over what we think it believe, it just happens. This is why I will not insult, belittle, or hate people for what they believe. Some people need their beliefs to survive, to try to destroy a person's entire belief system is dangerous.
  15. No more right-wing bullshit.

    Let's ask a Taoist priest what they think: As a priest, I believe my religion’s strength lies not in converting millions of new followers, but in respecting diversity. ... Picture this: Everyone in China has converted to Taoism. They all wear long ocher robes, nobody eats beef, and state laws are replaced by Taoist scriptures. Temples where Taoist ceremonies take place line the busy streets, and the Daodejing is recited solemnly. There are no more scholars, soldiers, farmers, or any other professions at odds with Taoist philosophy. To me, it sounds like a dystopia. Source: https://www.sixthtone.com/news/1532/a-taoist-china%3F-not-for-me%2C-thanks