Boundlesscostfairy

Can you deny this?

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Taking it apart and putting it back together.. the merging of Buddhism and Hinduism.. attachment and non attachment.. to Gods, Faery's and objects of meditation..

 

The peace of mind needed to attain enlightenment.. which requires absolute open mindedness.. single point mindedness.. and single point mindfulness..

 

What practice can you speak of and not call yoga, just in general.. Yoga encompasses all things!

 

All of life is a miracle: absorption yoga.. and miracle hatha posing asana yoga..

 

Could any concept in Buddhism be called an insight into the deeper ranges of mind yoga?

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10 hours ago, Boundlesscostfairy said:

Everything is yoga..?

There is yoga even in viyoga :) 

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10 hours ago, Boundlesscostfairy said:

Taking it apart and putting it back together.. the merging of Buddhism and Hinduism.. attachment and non attachment.. to Gods, Faery's and objects of meditation..

 

Back together, putting it apart and taking it.. the urge to merge from ism to ism.. meditation of the objects, Faery's and Gods.. attachment to the unattached.

 

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The peace of mind needed to attain enlightenment.. which requires absolute open mindedness.. single point mindedness.. and single point mindfulness..

 

Single point mindfulness, upon single point mindedness.. mindedness open absolute, which requires enlightenment attainment needed for the mind of peace.. Nevermind.

 

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What practice can you speak of and not call yoga, just in general.. Yoga encompasses all things!

 

All things encompass Yoga! What Yoga can we speak of and not call practice?.. what?

 

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All of life is a miracle: absorption yoga.. and miracle hatha posing asana yoga..

 

All miracles are of life!: Yoga asanas posing hatha miracles absorbing..

 

Quote

Could any concept in Buddhism be called an insight into the deeper ranges of mind yoga?

 

Can any yoga mind range deep into the insights of Buddhist concepts? :)

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11 hours ago, Boundlesscostfairy said:

Everything is yoga..?

 

Well, my first thought is if you define/name yoga as everything you've just limited everything and I don't think you can do that.  Well you can but what good is that and does it make a difference?   Everything is more than yoga and yoga is in everything.  My second thought is, it doesn't matter.  Everything is everything.  Everything else is everything.   Everything is more than we can know or imagine.  So, it's nice to think about but does it mean anything to everything?  We are so small in everything.

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12 hours ago, Boundlesscostfairy said:

Everything is yoga..?

 

In the Hindu forum then yes it is, as all is union.  But, move it is the general forum, and it begins to potentially break down... :)

 

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Nope. Yoga entails duality. It is, ultimately, not true.

 

A better statement, in my view, would be: Everything's nothing. -- or -- Nothing's everything.

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yoga and the vastness of "Hinduism" (with its sects and many schools taking place over thousands of years) can not be put into little boxes of only a single definition, obviously!  Btw, niether can Buddhism.

 

Btw, non-dualism is big enough to contain dualism if one will, and if one will not that's nothing to get hung about either.

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On 1/17/2018 at 10:18 PM, Boundlesscostfairy said:

Everything is yoga..?

 

Everything is Brahman (Sarvam Brahma Mayam) is well accepted in Hinduism.  Everything is yoga, well I haven't heard that, but if someone chooses to see everything as yoga, why not?

 

Sadasiva Brahmendra is a popular saint, advaita master and musician from 18th century southern India.  He composed the following carnatic music verses.

 

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Sarvam Brahma Mayam (All is Brahman) by Sadasiva Brahmendra

taalam: aadi
 

  sarvam brahmamayam rE rE   sarvam brahmamayam

 

1. kim vachaneeyam kima vachaneeyam
    kim rachaneeyam kima rachaneeyam

 

2. kim paThaneeyam kima paThaneyam
    kim bhajaneeyam kima bhajaneeyam

 

3. kim bOddhavyam kima bOddhavyam
    kim bhOktavyam kima bhOktavyam

 

4. sarvatra sadA hamsa dhyAnam
     kArtavyam bhO mukti nidAnam

 

English meaning 
 
Hey , hey everything is Brahman, everything is Brahman
 
1. All that is spoken, all that is not spoken,
    All that is written, all that is not written
 
2. All that can be learnt, all that cannot be learnt,
    All that can be sung and all that cannot be sung 
 
3. All that can be taught, all that cannot be taught,
    All that can be enjoyed and all that cannot be enjoyed 
 
4. In all places the meditation of the Hamsa scale,
    Is that only thing that leads you to salvation.

 

Listen to the Sarvam Brahmamayam rendered in traditional carnatic music by Priya Sisters

 

Edited by s1va
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1 hour ago, Boundlesscostfairy said:

Hmm, thinking about it I agree about Brahman..

 

But I now see Yoga as a method to keep in touch with Brahman..and any God or being in general..

 

Yes, yoga is generally seen as the path and not as the destination.

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9 minutes ago, s1va said:

 

Yes, yoga is generally seen as the path and not as the destination.

But if you look at the etymology, Yoga is also the goal. The union with the Supreme Consciousness. 

Edited by dwai
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On 1/17/2018 at 11:18 PM, Boundlesscostfairy said:

Steve is the coolest cool guy ever..?

 

man, nobody could ever, EVER deny that..

 

are you serious?

 

get real dude

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11 hours ago, dwai said:

But if you look at the etymology, Yoga is also the goal. The union with the Supreme Consciousness. 

 

What is a goal in general?  Per Vedanta and other scriptures, the human goals or purusharthas are broadly classified into 4 categories.  The four fold purusharthas are 1) dharma, 2) artha, 3) kaama & 4) moksha.   Any action that any human engages on can be classified into one of these 4 categories.  The actual order in which they are followed is artha, kaama, dharma and  moksha.  1) Arhta or Necessities - means engaging in the pursuit to gain the necessities that are needed to live a human life, such as food, clothing, shelter, etc.  2) Kaama or Luxuries -  engaging in the pursuit of things that are not a necessity to live, but add value to our life, or make the living experience more enjoyable.  3) Dharma or Virtue - engaging in actions in a virtuous ways. 4) Moksha or Liberation -  The ultimate goal for all, end of suffering, to come out of the cycle of birth and death.   

 

Swami Paramarthananda, who is a disciple of Swami Dayananda Saraswati, explains the purusharthas or human goals beautifully in his talks on the topic Tattva Bodha (by Shankara).   In this talks, he says the actual purushartha per the Vedanta is only one, which is Moksha or Liberation.  Then, why describe them as 4 and allow the pursuit of other things?  He explains this elegantly.  We are caught up on samsara, like a child that is caught up with some sickness.  When the child is sick, the mother puts the medicinal herbal powder on the tongue.  But, due to the medicine's bitter taste, the child just spits it out.   The mother knows that the child needs to take the medicine to get better.  So, she mixes the herbal powder with honey and then slowly gives it to the child, little at a time.  In the same way, the Rishis knew that if they say mokhsa or liberation is the only ultimate goal, then lot of people may not even listen to them.  They might ask, what about the next meal? the dinner on the table, such worldly things may be the huge concern on the mind.  So, they designed 4 fold human goals.  They said, it's okay to engage in the pursuit of necessary things (artha), even allowed the pursuit of things that are luxurious (kaama) to certain extent, as long as such action are done under the guidelines of the Dharma (3rd goal or purushartha).  So long as a person acts with the clear understanding that moksha or liberation from all suffering is the ultimate goal.    In truth, liberation was the only goal all the time.  But, we need to balance it with our living condition and immediate needs.  Therefore the concession.  Like how the mother added honey, the Rishis made it sound sweet,  pursuit of other worldly things are alright, as long as one is clear that moksha is the ultimate goal.    

 

Now, where would yoga fall under those 4 categories of human goals?  Yoga can be done in the pursuit of bare necessities or to acquire luxuries, it can be done in dharmic or virtuous way and it can be done for moksha (liberation) also.  Depending on a person's motive or intent, the action of yoga can fall under any one of those 4 human goals.  But, all of these are just goals.  Including the actions undertaken for the moksha (liberation) purushartha.  The actual state of liberation/moksha, which is the destination, is not the same as any of the tasks undertaken in the pursuit of any one of the 4 human goals.   Hence, the path is just the path, and not the destination.

 

-----------------

 

Download the mp3 talks on Tattva Bodha by Swami Paramarthananda.  One of the best discourse, I have ever heard on this topic.  The swami has a knack to explain, complex vedantic terms in an easy to understand way for everyone.  He has done an excellent job especially on this particular commentary for Tattva Bodha.  He explains the purusharthas beautifully in one of the talks.

http://hinduonline.co/AudioLibrary/Discources/CommentaryonTattvaBodhaParamarthananda.html

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24 minutes ago, s1va said:

 

 

Now, where would yoga fall under those 4 categories of human goals?  Yoga can be done in the pursuit of bare necessities or to acquire luxuries, it can be done in dharmic or virtuous way and it can be done for moksha (liberation) also.  Depending on a person's motive or intent, the action of yoga can fall under any one of those 4 human goals.  But, all of these are just goals.  Including the actions undertaken for the moksha (liberation) purushartha.  The actual state of liberation/moksha, which is the destination, is not the same as any of the tasks undertaken in the pursuit of any one of the 4 human goals.   Hence, the path is just the path, and not the destination.

Really I am referring to Yoga a-la Patanjali - aka Ashtanga Yoga. It is perfect. It does not interfere with the pursuit¬†of the purushńĀrthas, of which moksha is the most important one.

 

Outer Practices - these can help with the following (dharma,artha, kama). These allow a person to be physically and mentally healthy, remain dharmic and not go overboard with these outer pursuits.

  1. Yama - The restraints or restrictions one should follow. Such as ahimsa, astńďya, aparigraha, etc. These are things one should NOT do to live a simple and unfettered life. These are not contrary to pursuit of the purushńĀrthas.
  2. Niyama - The things one should be doing. Such as santŇćsha, Ňõauńáa, tapas, etc. These are not contrary to the pursuit of the purushńĀrthas.¬†
  3. Asana (everyone knows these)
  4. Pranyama (everyone knows these).

Inner Practices (dharma, moksha)  -- these help the individual work towards moksha per the dharmic way. 

  1. PratyńĀhńĀra - Sense withdrawal. To pull back the senses from external objects to internal objects. This begins the process of self-inquiry
  2. dhńĀrana - To undertake the task of attaining¬†single-pointed attention.¬†
  3. dhyńĀna - When one attains single-pointed attention
  4. samńĀdhi - When one's mental modifications have settled down, allowing one to countenance one's true nature. By attaining samńĀdhi repeatedly, one develops the conditions for mŇćksha.

 

 

Edited by dwai

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1 minute ago, dwai said:

Really I am referring to Yoga a-la Patanjali - aka Ashtanga Yoga. It is perfect. It does not interfere with the pursuit¬†of the purushńĀrthas, of which moksha is the most important one.

 

Outer Practices - these can help with the following (dharma,artha, kama). These allow a person to be physically and mentally healthy, remain dharmic and not go overboard with pursuit of these outer pursuits.

  1. Yama - The restraints or restrictions one should follow. Such as ahimsa, astńďya, aparigraha, etc. These are things one should NOT do to live a simple and unfettered life. These are not contrary to pursuit of the purushńĀrthas.
  2. Niyama - The things one should be doing. Such as santŇćsha, Ňõauńáa, tapas, etc. These are not contrary to the pursuit of the purushńĀrthas.¬†
  3. Asana (everyone knows these)
  4. Pranyama (everyone knows these).

Inner Practices (dharma, moksha)  -- these help the individual work towards moksha per the dharmic way. 

  1. PratyńĀhńĀra - Sense withdrawal. To pull back the senses from external objects to internal objects. This begins the process of self-inquiry
  2. dhńĀrana - To undertake the task of attaining¬†single-pointed attention.¬†
  3. dhyńĀna - When one attains single-pointed attention
  4. samńĀdhi - When one's mental modifications have settled down, allowing one to countenance one's true nature.

 

 

 

Yes, Ashtanga yoga and it's techniques can be effective for some.  It's still means only.  It's not the destination or the actual liberation.  One can engage on ashtanga yoga, karma yoga, bhakti yoga, janana yoga or any one  of the other 12 yogas described on gita, in pursuit of moksha or in pursuit of worldly things.  All of these are means, and not the end.  None of this is Brahman.  Engaging in any of these sincerely might take one to the destination.  But, these are all paths.

 

(Engaging in any of these yogas will still fall under one of the 4 purusharthas stated, like all other human actions.  Where is the question of interfering, when all actions fall under any one of the 4?  No action can possibly interfere with any purushartha.) 

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10 minutes ago, s1va said:

 

Yes, Ashtanga yoga and it's techniques can be effective for some.  It's still means only.  It's not the destination or the actual liberation.  One can engage on ashtanga yoga, karma yoga, bhakti yoga, janana yoga or any one  of the other 12 yogas described on gita, in pursuit of moksha or in pursuit of worldly things.  All of these are means, and not the end.  None of this is Brahman.  Engaging in any of these sincerely might take one to the destination.  But, these are all paths.

 

(Engaging in any of these yogas will still fall under one of the 4 purusharthas stated, like all other human actions.  Where is the question of interfering, when all actions fall under any one of the 4?  No action can possibly interfere with any purushartha.) 

Actually they are all Brahman. First part of Jnana is to know that none of this is real. Only Brahman is real.

Final part of jnana is to know that all this is nothing but Brahman. :)

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22 minutes ago, dwai said:

Actually they are all Brahman. First part of Jnana is to know that none of this is real. Only Brahman is real.

Final part of jnana is to know that all this is nothing but Brahman. :)

 

If 'Everything is Brahman', then one can say, yoga is part of everything, therefore Yoga is also  Brahman.  It's fine up until this point.  But, if we were to say, 'Yoga is Brahman', that is a huge leap, so is everything else, we all know that, so there is nothing special about yoga, right?  why get hung up on a word?  This is the point I was trying to make all along.  They are all means, some of them great means.

But, if someone were to take such stance with yoga, it is fine with me :)  Everything that is Non-yoga is also Brahman.  (kim yoga, kima yoga, in Sadasiva Brahman's words)

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6 minutes ago, s1va said:

 

If 'Everything is Brahman', then one can say, yoga is part of everything, therefore Yoga is also  Brahman.  It's fine up until this point.  But, if we were to say, 'Yoga is Brahman', that is a huge leap, so is everything else, we all know that, so there is nothing special about yoga, right?  why get hung up on a word?  This is the point I was trying to make all along.  They are all means, some of them great means.

But, if someone were to take such stance with yoga, it is fine with me :)  Everything that is Non-yoga is also Brahman.  (kim yoga, kima yoga, in Sadasiva Brahman's words)

:) Just fun to exchange such ideas. 

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@s1va have you read Aparokshanubhuti by Shankaracharya? 

 

In that he maps the Ashtanga Yoga path in terms of Advaita Vedanta sadhana. Wonderful. 

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1 hour ago, dwai said:

@s1va have you read Aparokshanubhuti by Shankaracharya? 

 

In that he maps the Ashtanga Yoga path in terms of Advaita Vedanta sadhana. Wonderful. 

 

I don't recall reading that text.  I will check it out sometime.  Shankara has done numerous works on diverse topics, some of them devotional, some yogic and some even  dealing with Tantra and Kundaluni yoga as the one  described below.

 

I have read some of the beautiful hymns from Soundarya Lahiri, which  are attributed to Shankara.  It's not only just devotional hymns that describe the beauty and glories of Goddess Parvati, but also a  detailed Tantric and Kundalini text. The advaitic theme can be seen on all Shankara's work including this.  The Ananda Lahiri, that precedes Soundarya Lahiri is also a beautiful text to be cherished.

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47 minutes ago, s1va said:

 

I don't recall reading that text.  I will check it out sometime.  Shankara has done numerous works on diverse topics, some of them devotional, some yogic and some even  dealing with Tantra and Kundaluni yoga as the one  described below.

Yes. But do read the Aparokshanubhuti (I've posted a link to a good translation) here -- Aparoksha Anubhuti

 

47 minutes ago, s1va said:

 

I have read some of the beautiful hymns from Soundarya Lahiri, which  are attributed to Shankara.  It's not only just devotional hymns that describe the beauty and glories of Goddess Parvati, but also a  detailed Tantric and Kundalini text. The advaitic theme can be seen on all Shankara's work including this.  The Ananda Lahiri, that precedes Soundarya Lahiri is also a beautiful text to be cherished.

Sounds like names of my family members ;) 

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18 minutes ago, dwai said:

Yes. But do read the Aparokshanubhuti (I've posted a link to a good translation) here -- Aparoksha Anubhuti

 

Sounds like names of my family members ;) 

 

It's spelt Soundarya Lahari in some places.  Soundarya Lahiri in many places in south India, which is the spelling I used like the link below.  Interesting to note, it sounds like your family members.  I just guessed why. :)

https://www.amazon.com/Soundarya-Lahiri-Anooradha-Sriram/dp/B000QR33CE

 

In a way, they are your family members (and mine).  Parvati and Shiva are supposed to be the mother and father for the entire world as Kalidasa states: jagatah pitarau vande pArvatIparameshvarau.

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On 1/17/2018 at 11:18 PM, Boundlesscostfairy said:

Everything is yoga..?

 

Who could deny this?

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