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sketchbo0k

Where do I start?

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There is a ton of information everywhere. I want to start Qigong but I don't know where. I had an instructor teaching me Bagua but when I asked him to teach me Qigong he would always change the subject or say "later later" (this is probably because we don't have much time where we train because of area reservations).

 

I have started reading "The root of chinese Qigong" by Dr.Yang but I want to also start practicing and cultivating energy. I have some health problems (eczema mainly and minor lumbar problems) and I wish to start the healing process. I do know that it takes time and I'm in no rush for results. But results won't come without actual practice. According to Dr.Yang, I must read AND understand TROCQ before I can move on to the other book that has the Yi Jin Jing and Xi Sui Jing. TROCQ is huge and has tons of information, but is it really necessary to go over that one before moving onto practical stuff?

 

What would you guys recommend?

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Take a class, be persistent.  Try to practice multiple times a week at least if not once per day.  For me, it took a few weeks up to a month before I started really "getting it."   If you have options, really look around for the best instructor.  Videos and books may work for some, but I find that videos and books can only supplement a practice that starts with personal instructions in a good Tai Chi or Qigong class.

Edited by futuredaze

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What would you guys recommend?

 

I recommend keeping it simple. Too much non-essential information can engender complications, distraction, and even confusion.

 

You might try learning Qigong from Jenny Lamb's DVD "Qigong for Self-Healing." Visit easterninternalarts.com if you want to order a copy.

 

Also, one of my favorite techniques is non-meditation.

 

The teaching for non-meditation is: no effort, no technique.

 

Just sit there, like a dog or cat. Just BE. Don't TRY at all. You might naturally begin to breathe more deeply and start to feel at peace. But don't TRY to be at peace.

 

This form of meditation releases energy blockages naturally and effortlessly- illusions just slip away without "doing" anything at all. Another thing it does is give you your natural, effortless state of being. Ramana Maharshi said, "The true state is effortless, and must be if it is the true state."

 

You can practice being in that "true state" with non-meditation.

 

Good luck and have fun whatever you choose to do.

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My understanding is that Bagua is its own kind of Qigong and that circle walking circulates energy quite effectively. Maybe ask your teacher (he simply may not be knowledgeable on the internal components) what Bagua movements are best for internal healing?

Other members on this forum: Gerard, Baguakicksass, Spiraltao....etc....

They may have some useful advice as they all practice Bagua I believe and can maybe refer you some healing Bagua movements.

Edited by OldChi
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 (he simply may not be knowledgeable on the internal components) 

 

He's actually incredibly knowledgeable. He's a Chinese muslim and have learned under well known masters. I live in a very small country so he's the only one known for teaching authentic Chinese martial arts. He takes some students to where he used to learn during the summer holidays. I actually found out he teaches Bagua by coincidence. I had went with a friend to learn Gong fu because I had given up on finding a XingYi teacher here. But then I asked him and showed him my PiChuan. He was surprised that I knew this martial art so he took me in as a student. Then he told me to practice XingYi at home and learn Bagua when I am at the training place with him. 

 

He just doesn't seem to want to teach me QiGong. We would have 10-15 minute Zhang Zhuang at the beginning of the sessions but then our time was shortened by the guys who own the place so we had to move on with our essential training.

 

There aren't any other QiGong teachers here unfortunately.

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It's not chi gung, but its kinda close.  Wim Hof has a 10 Week course, Wim Hof method,  a way of acclimatizing to the cold.  There's cold showers into ice baths, deep rapid breathing method that produces some interesting body hacks.

 

I mention it because you said eczema and many people have found relief as a side effect.  Minor side effect it cured my dandriff.   Its a powerful system you can learn quickly, though not easy.  It doesn't take alot of time, but it requires and develops good will power. 

 

You may want to look into it on the web or there are 2 or 3 threads on it here, including one of my experience with it in my PPD

 

or Google 'eczema Wim Hof method', you'll find people who've report good results.  10 hard weeks, 14 for me, and you might see some lifetime results.. or not, your mileage may vary B)

Edited by thelerner
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Zhang Zhuang is qigong (in my understanding?). Are you looking for something special? The grass always looks greener on the other side....basic standing postures and circle walking are great tools for circulating chi. If you don't have enough time while training, just practice it at home on a daily basis (which should be done anyways). 

 

I would also like to note that this entire forum your on is filled with hundreds of sources for Qigong....sounds like you need to take your head out of your booty and value what's already at your plate. 

Edited by OldChi

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Zhang Zhuang is qigong (in my understanding?). Are you looking for something special? The grass always looks greener on the other side....basic standing postures and circle walking are great tools for circulating chi. If you don't have enough time while training, just practice it at home on a daily basis (which should be done anyways). 

 

I would also like to note that this entire forum your on is filled with hundreds of sources for Qigong....sounds like you need to take your head out of your booty and value what's already at your plate. 

 

Yes, I am hoping to learn Yi Jin Jing. Xi Sui Jing is said to be dangerous and shouldn't be learned without a teacher. I am positive that if I can practice YJJ and be able to do it properly he will guide me through XSJ

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There is a ton of information everywhere. I want to start Qigong but I don't know where. I had an instructor teaching me Bagua but when I asked him to teach me Qigong he would always change the subject or say "later later" (this is probably because we don't have much time where we train because of area reservations).

 

I have started reading "The root of chinese Qigong" by Dr.Yang but I want to also start practicing and cultivating energy. I have some health problems (eczema mainly and minor lumbar problems) and I wish to start the healing process. I do know that it takes time and I'm in no rush for results. But results won't come without actual practice. According to Dr.Yang, I must read AND understand TROCQ before I can move on to the other book that has the Yi Jin Jing and Xi Sui Jing. TROCQ is huge and has tons of information, but is it really necessary to go over that one before moving onto practical stuff?

 

What would you guys recommend?

 

Great question!  From the standpoint of a student there are some books that just fit my system better.  I have an instructors cert in Wuji and Eight Mother Palms standing qigong, which is kind of the vibratory engine of the internal systems.

 

‚ÄčI have two personal favorite postures and they are my faves for very different reasons, my first favorite is Wuji.¬† ALL of your forms will start and end in it, think about that.¬† Must be important, eh?¬† :D¬† The other I love is known as the hunyuan posture of the embracing the barrel or embracing the tree all of which I have heard the position I call thunder palms.¬† This posture was held for many hours along with the other seven.¬† Wuji, is a great way to find your CENTER.¬† Find it then come back on your heels a bit, no so much you lose balance but more weight on the heels than any other part of the foot.

 

 

‚ÄčAs for muscle tendon changing I am quite sure this happens with time in all three internal arts.

 

 

A great set to add for daily practice is the 8 pieces of brocade!   That form and the Sam Chein form (Sanchin, Sanzhan) are the two forms I have seen most results from

 

‚ÄčThese last two would be moving meditation and you should be able to find plent of examples.¬† I can't recommend obtaining a copy of Liang Shou Yu's Qigong Enlightenment enough!

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If you have any connection at all to your bagua teacher stick with them!

In person instruction by a qualified teacher with whom you share a real connection, is beyond platinum value in my experience.

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I am seeing potential problems here...heheheh... :)  Well, your teacher has already declined to teach you real chi kung.  Instead of respecting his wishes or trying to understand why, you are seeking all over to learn chi kung one way or the others.  Are you trying to impress your instructor that he would teach you chi kung eventually?  Because he decided to take you in because you have some previous knowledge of PiChaun? 

 

Looks like a classic kung fu movie plot right here.  A master refused to teach one of his students certain martial art styles because of various real reasons.  Student getting upset over it and desperately seeking all over to learn what he thinks he should have learned or he should have been taught.  Ultimately, the student begins to resent his teacher because he believes that his teacher is keeping him down.  I am wondering how this relationship would end.... :)  Like Skywalker Anakin vs Oba-wan...heheheheh....      

 

And you posted a question here and getting replies from other enablers....hehehehe...because some posters know no better.  BTW, if you don't practice chi kung, chi can be harness...fyi.  I sense chi and I can complete the MCO.  Yet, I don't practice kung fu or in any particular chi kung styles.  I have no issues in learning it but I find it that's not necessary because my chi tends to flow very naturally.  To believe that you must engage in any particular chi kung style practices to harness your chi...can be misleading. 

Edited by ChiForce

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