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"Meditation can lead people into possible psychosis," according by Dr. Miguel Farias, author of "The Buddha Pill: Can Meditation Change You?"

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It is Very common for many of the finest teachers all over the world to ask participants of meditation retreats if they have had a history of mental illness or problems regarding such aspects of their lives.

 

This is not for liability reasons, it is not in order to ferret out "problem types" and it is not for any insular reasons.

 

Meditation will open energy channels, reduce dissipation of energy, give great rest to areas that have not rested (and therefore they will regain energy and reserves) - all these things and many more will create what is often a surge of freshness and vitality and presence. But this surge can hit deviations and elevate them beyond the matrix of compressions that heretofore kept them under the covers. 

 

This is only one easily identified concern and well laid out in most real teachings but often overlooked by teachers and students in the haste to get to some validation of "all this stuff" being learned.

 

The not so obvious is meditation being mistaken for "disconnect" and "isolation". Another not so obvious problem is the very real encounter of one who has reached very high levels of meditation - meaning the very pure simple form - and actual physical changes at extremely subtle levels take place. In these experiences it can at some point seem like loosing ones mind, loosing ones ability to remember, short term memory loss and the onset of Alzheimer's. It can be extremely disorienting and easy to loose ones place in brain fog and fear.

 

One of the most wonderful reasons for the assanas in Yoga is to stretch out through ones bodies the changes that are taking place energetically. To prepare for the changes that are about to take place, and to help in the intergration of the dietary changes and behavioral changes that the student is expected to undertake.

 

Meditation is not some cardboard label attached to a product that has a staid message and a singular purpose - it does not have a purpose. In the passageway of mirrors and mists in the transcendence in meditation great peace will be found and un-found.

Queezy times - glorious times - doubtful times - angry times and mountains of release and revisiting - knowing and not knowing.

 

Where there was once sanctity in ignorance there is now a thousand cans of worms - opening often just when it felt like you were past "them". 

 

Meditation - getting to meditation - many harrowing stories - the experiences are vast. Often it is not so much so called baggage as much as the depth of ones transcendence - "baggage" is part of living - confronting it intentionally is not the common fair of most of mankind.

 

 

Edited by Spotless
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Personally, if I would accept the task of trying to guide a person through the confused layers of the mind, I wouldn't start with meditation. 

 

If you are going somewhere, using meditation as a tool for investigation, you need a point of origin. Somewhere to go back to, like a cabin in the Woods that is in a known location. 

 

This is easiest done by simple movements. Could be yoga, qigong or IMA. Not the kind that focus on Qi, you want to focus on the physical body. 

The external six harmonies, balance, stuff like that is very useful.

 

When you have laid a foundation, meditation becomes useful. 

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Meditation is a personal, beautiful action. I don't know how anybody, no matter where they are educated, can comment on such a personal experience and call it hazardous for all people in general.

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To answer the doctors question, you don't take a pill and no it doesn't change you. It's remembering who you are. It remembering what the universe is.

Edited by Adia
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I think the key question is what type of meditation you are practicing. I come from the Pure Land tradition, so meditation for me is a supplementary practice. I mostly practice anapana, which is a very gentle, forgiving practice that can develop quiessence. 

 

I haven't practice vipassana as taught by Goenka, but it strikes me as a very demanding method, which should be reserved for those more advanced on their path. Of course, forgive my ignorance and feel free to correct me.

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