relaxer

Standing, Zhan Zhuang, Its BENEFITS, limitations

Recommended Posts

I have been standing for about two and a half years now and practicing taichi Yang style long form in the ChenManChing/TT Liang/Ray Hayward Lineage for the past year.

 

I just met and practiced with my Taichi teacher this past month and he strongly emphasized the incredible importance of standing, not just as a foundation, but as a stand alone, COMPLETELY whole practice as it is. I've re-established my standing practice since then and I'm amazed at its power. It's easy to leave something as simple and subtle as standing behind for something more active and "challenging". I understand that the apparent lack of subtlety and strength in my taichi practice is inherent in my lack of experience and not the PRACTICE ITSELF. I, however, am consistently amazed by the capacity of standing to immediately affect the internal and external aspects of my being, to provide a solid sense of well-being, calm confidence, and a rootedness in-the-body.

 

I previously held the sense that STANDING could be likened to working on the engine. After hours, days, months, and years of practice, one would be able to take this engine and install it into a taichi "vehicle", at which time the subtleties of alignment, movement, and breath become more apparent and subject to the focus of awareness. Now, I'm not so sure. I wonder if standing is BOTH the engine and the vehicle (long term).

 

I understand that this metaphor is messy because at assumes a moving toward some endpoint, goal. I would replace "a moving toward some endpoint, goal" with moving toward a better understanding of this organism's relationship to BEING.

 

I expect to get some flak for a question like this for a couple reasons:

 

1. Everyone is different. Some will choose to stand and do nothing else. So, in that sense, STANDING is the whole, the engine and the vehicle, from beginning to end.

 

2. Some will never stand and come to similar realizations and enjoyment of life AS IT IS.

 

As I come to the end of this post, a question reveals itself. For those of you who have stood, who have established that relationship, how longterm has it been for you? Is there a law of diminishing returns at work here, ie does standing pay off big time at the beginning, and not so much later on? At which time, would one be advised to move into a practice like taichi or the like?

 

Thank you for taking the time to read this. I'm enjoying my standing and taichi practice a lot lately and I'm thankful for the availability of a place like this to throw out these questions that bubble up from time to time.

 

ben

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I previously held the sense that STANDING could be likened to working on the engine. After hours, days, months, and years of practice, one would be able to take this engine and install it into a taichi "vehicle", at which time the subtleties of alignment, movement, and breath become more apparent and subject to the focus of awareness. Now, I'm not so sure. I wonder if standing is BOTH the engine and the vehicle (long term).

 

 

 

 

fascinating and well worded analogy.

 

perhaps you are right in your last statement, perhaps not.

 

regardless, it does not detract nor bestow anything more to standing meditation, which is what it is...

 

 

all i know that standing meditation is a rigor that can truly revolutionize one's being

it is a great 'way', worthy of the fullest dedicated effort that one can muster

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Makes perfect sense to me!

 

If I am a drummer in a rhythm section, have a solid pocket, great feel and time, I should be able to easily shift gears into different genres, work with other players, etc.

 

Back to the woodshed....

 

Much thanks,

 

Robert

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been standing for about two and a half years now and practicing taichi Yang style long form in the ChenManChing/TT Liang/Ray Hayward Lineage for the past year.

 

I just met and practiced with my Taichi teacher this past month and he strongly emphasized the incredible importance of standing, not just as a foundation, but as a stand alone, COMPLETELY whole practice as it is. I've re-established my standing practice since then and I'm amazed at its power. It's easy to leave something as simple and subtle as standing behind for something more active and "challenging". I understand that the apparent lack of subtlety and strength in my taichi practice is inherent in my lack of experience and not the PRACTICE ITSELF. I, however, am consistently amazed by the capacity of standing to immediately affect the internal and external aspects of my being, to provide a solid sense of well-being, calm confidence, and a rootedness in-the-body.

 

I previously held the sense that STANDING could be likened to working on the engine. After hours, days, months, and years of practice, one would be able to take this engine and install it into a taichi "vehicle", at which time the subtleties of alignment, movement, and breath become more apparent and subject to the focus of awareness. Now, I'm not so sure. I wonder if standing is BOTH the engine and the vehicle (long term).

 

I understand that this metaphor is messy because at assumes a moving toward some endpoint, goal. I would replace "a moving toward some endpoint, goal" with moving toward a better understanding of this organism's relationship to BEING.

 

I expect to get some flak for a question like this for a couple reasons:

 

1. Everyone is different. Some will choose to stand and do nothing else. So, in that sense, STANDING is the whole, the engine and the vehicle, from beginning to end.

 

2. Some will never stand and come to similar realizations and enjoyment of life AS IT IS.

 

As I come to the end of this post, a question reveals itself. For those of you who have stood, who have established that relationship, how longterm has it been for you? Is there a law of diminishing returns at work here, ie does standing pay off big time at the beginning, and not so much later on? At which time, would one be advised to move into a practice like taichi or the like?

 

Thank you for taking the time to read this. I'm enjoying my standing and taichi practice a lot lately and I'm thankful for the availability of a place like this to throw out these questions that bubble up from time to time.

 

ben

 

"I, however, am consistently amazed by the capacity of standing to immediately affect the internal and external aspects of my being, to provide a solid sense of well-being, calm confidence, and a rootedness in-the-body."

 

Just curious about the point above. What criteria, objective or subjective, do you evaluate that claim with? My experience was not so immediate, but it was amazing nevertheless.

 

"As I come to the end of this post, a question reveals itself. For those of you who have stood, who have established that relationship, how longterm has it been for you? Is there a law of diminishing returns at work here, ie does standing pay off big time at the beginning, and not so much later on? At which time, would one be advised to move into a practice like taichi or the like?"

 

I guess I'm repeating myself here, but I have to use an increment of a year for meaningful measure of progress. Chi flow continues to get stronger and more manipulable, but with shoulder surgery, I'll only be able to stand for 4-6 months or so and not have the benefits o the dynamic movements. So I guess I'll have some good data soon!

 

I hear that tai chi is appropriate when your ZZ begins to be felt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Just curious about the point above. What criteria, objective or subjective, do you evaluate that claim with? My experience was not so immediate, but it was amazing nevertheless.

 

 

 

Thanks guys, for the input. Good question. A brief history might give a little more sense to my statements. I was a wrestler as a little guy through high school. I feel that established/forced a very in-the-body perspective for those very formative years of my life. After that, I tended toward very physically demanding exercise routines. I lifted weights hard and biked long distances. I grew tired and bored of such routines. I started getting more interested in combining my interest in truth with my physical discipline. I first looked to yoga and went directly into Bikram yoga, one of the more intense varieties, taught in a 105 degree room 26 postures each done twice for 90 minutes total. I loved it at first, but doing it everyday soon took a toll. Something didn't add up. I wanted something that I could fold comfortably into an everyday practice that would jive with my evolving intellectual understanding of "truth".

 

I started getting interesting in non-duality, advaita, etc... Soon after I met my teacher, Jon. He taught me basic standing and gave me Lam Kam Chuen's book Way to Power. I trusted him and did what he said, standing everyday, even if it was for a short period of time. Even from the beginning, I felt an incredible potential in the deep relaxation of standing that I had never experienced in yoga. Yoga seemed very full of fire to me, while standing felt more like water. Slow to heat, but sustaining. Yoga would pick me way up and then drop me off - BAM and I'd have to take a long nap to recover. Standing left me energized and more sensitive to my body in a way I had never experienced. It felt as though the monkey mind was somehow quelled. as if I was relating to existence from more of a single point rather than a galaxy of revolving and warring planets. Keep in mind, all of this was very subtle. I can't remember having any glorious come to Jesus moments or wild chi balls coming out my third eye. It just felt right. It was a coming home, as if something in my heart said, this is what you need. I guess my pump was primed. I was bored with western exercise, and something about my relationship to yoga was becoming inauthentic... I do sometimes wonder though, if doing Bikram yoga everyday for 8 months prior to standing helped to break up some blocks that aided in my appreciation of Standing's subtlety. I'm sure it must have.

 

I'm coming back to standing now after many months of focusing almost obsessively on Taichi. It's just been a short time, but I feel the same single-pointedness, and gratitude for the practice as I did when my teacher, Jon, passed it onto me. I'll let you know how my experience changes when it does if this thread is still alive.

 

You said that your experience was not so immediate but amazing, nonetheless. I'm really interested in your experience if you're willing to relate it! Thanks for your reply.

 

ben

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Using the concept of the energy standing it is also that one posture may not help a second one as the energyflow is different. So if you have 108 Forms which you can divide in 200+ Posture and (left and right counts also as different) you may see that it is a task of years and hours per day which can be cut down with Qigong by developing in Qualitiy and Quantitiy.

 

Sense would be doing one posture mastering and getting to the next and in the end connect the static in a flow.The movement between two posture can be count as 1 extra posture and this has to be done in slow motion I mean slooooow as slooooow as one not break the flow and the posture. It is like shifting a bowl of water without spilling it and breaking the bowl that is made of thin ice. With mastery the speed one can move (without the break of the posture) increase.

 

I prefer this way as one learn the conncept of standing first and minimizing strain and tension and learn the biomechanics and how to make the internal force for using the posture and then use this rules on the rest, it will not look beautiful and is not for performing in the park - which make everyone at least give a good laughter- until one can perform the rules naturally.

 

Q

 

 

Thanks for the input! I really like the suggestion above about breaking the form down into different static "standing" postures and then very slowly with much awareness bringing them together.

 

That's something I'll definitely give a try.

 

ben

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I come to the end of this post, a question reveals itself. For those of you who have stood, who have established that relationship, how longterm has it been for you? Is there a law of diminishing returns at work here, ie does standing pay off big time at the beginning, and not so much later on? At which time, would one be advised to move into a practice like taichi or the like?

 

ben

 

Hey Ben! I think posting is an extremely important aspect, it sounds to me like you're learning from a great teacher. I believe that posting for years helped some things to open up because I had stored internal energy. It's not really something that gets old, but it does evolve. Some times sitting in lotus is just like posting, only you're not sending the energy down your legs. 'Sit as if you are standing, stand as if you are sitting'. I wouldn't say it's a diminished return at all, in fact quite the opposite. If you feel like you're hitting a ceiling with it then you most likely need to take a break from it; I do that at times and after a few weeks the energy is insanely stronger when I return to the practice. There are some series of posts (like maoshan 5E) that I can only do so many times due to the intensity of the energy, this happens in general though; there are some practices that you can only do so often.

 

As for what to practice, it's all quite subjective! I would say continue with the Tai chi, it's the perfect place to be. When you've learned enough of that and want to learn more I would suggest Ba Gua, make sure you're learning from someone who teaches the internal aspect. Your Tai chi is a perfect base for it and it will teach you more explicit degrees of energy direction and integration. Xing yi is nice too.

 

If anyones new to posting, heres some dork outlining good posture basics for posting;

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Standing like a tree" remains as my favourite static qi gong, after these last twenty years: deeper layers of subtlety unfolding endlessly...

 

"If I had to choose one qigong technique to practice, it would undoubtedly be this one. Many Chinese call standing meditation 'the million dollar secret of qigong.' Whether you are practicing qigong for self healing, for building healing ch'i, for massage or healing work on others, standing is an essential practice. Acupuncturists feel that by practicing standing meditation they can connect with the ch'i of the universe, and be able to send it through their bodies when they hold the acupuncture needle ... Standing is probably the single most important qigong exercise. One of the reasons that standing is such a powerful way to gather and accumulate fresh ch'i in the body is that during the practice of standing the body is in the optimal posture for ch'i gathering and flow."

- Kenneth S. Cohen

 

"Standing" is the crux technique of Antero Alli's ritual work

http://www.paratheatrical.com/noform.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe standing post was a later addition to the Chinese Martial Art curriculum, traditional Hsing I, Tai chi and Ba Gau did not include standing post.

 

I never got much from standing post, I prefer the classical tai chi square form

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If anyones new to posting, heres some dork outlining good posture basics for posting;

:lol: lol!

 

Even the advice of dorks can be a valuable commodity on Taobums.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:lol: lol!

 

Even the advice of dorks can be a valuable commodity on Taobums.

 

 

Dorks can be very good.

 

Thanks, guys, for the vids and good info. I can already tell that rededicating myself to the simplicity of standing has reinvigorated my practice. I'm keeping it simple, not moving through and of the arm postures (holding the ball,etc) and just staying in pure wuji standing for about 30 minutes after doing my Taichi stretches in the AM and PM. I'm finding this a good amount of time for now, but as I move forward I will look to increase to an hour.

 

Somebody mentioned doing some sitting after standing. My teacher, conversely, once recommended sitting before standing.

 

What seems to be the benefit of sitting after standing? I think it may have had something to do with sublimation, but I can't quite remember. Any experience here is appreciated!

 

Thank you for the encouragement and advice. Thanks Red Phoenix. I'll stick to Taichi for now, but there is a real resonance with BaGua that I'm looking forward to exploring once my practice is ready.

 

ben

 

post-57698-129830742315_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Somebody mentioned doing some sitting after standing. My teacher, conversely, once recommended sitting before standing.

 

What seems to be the benefit of sitting after standing? I think it may have had something to do with sublimation, but I can't quite remember. Any experience here is appreciated!

 

Hi Ben,

 

In my understanding,it has to do with cultivation: jing->Qi->Shen

Of course, standing, moving, sitting, all work on the three levels, but is is a matter of proportion. By comparison, it seems that standing cultivate more jing, because it involves the legs. When you sit,your body structure is quite at rest: by crossing the legs, you redirect energy towards the torso,and can naturally stimulate circulation in Ren and Du channels (Xiao Zhou Tian) and concentrate on nourishing Shen by refinement after having stimulated the Jing, cultivated the Qi. You collect the fruits of your work in sitting.

My 2 cents

Leopoldson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ben,

 

In my understanding,it has to do with cultivation: jing->Qi->Shen

Of course, standing, moving, sitting, all work on the three levels, but is is a matter of proportion. By comparison, it seems that standing cultivate more jing, because it involves the legs. When you sit,your body structure is quite at rest: by crossing the legs, you redirect energy towards the torso,and can naturally stimulate circulation in Ren and Du channels (Xiao Zhou Tian) and concentrate on nourishing Shen by refinement after having stimulated the Jing, cultivated the Qi. You collect the fruits of your work in sitting.

My 2 cents

Leopoldson

 

 

Thanks for the good info, Leopoldson.

 

I've been practicing embryonic and reverse breathing as far as my sitting is concerned. I've also done a lot of sitting with just placing my awareness on the lower dan tien. In your experience, does one nourish Shen better than the other after cultivating Jing with standing?

 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi relaxer

 

I have not practiced EB yet so I cannot compare.I practice MCO and after that sitting in mindfulness..it is a time when all previous activities,energies merge,settle and nourish my mindfulness so that sometimes there is only mindfulness

 

In my experience my meditation is more profound after jing/qi cultivation.

 

All the best,

Leo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is anyone familiar with side effects from zhan zhuang? I've noticed that if I'm going to feel side effects from any type of qigong, its this. I've noticed in particular that if I do the holding the ball position in front of chakras that I consider relatively weak, such as my solar plexus, that I feel very odd later. Is this a normal thing to get through or what?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi dmattwads,

 

Do you practice daily? for what duration? Do you find it difficult? Do you feel tensed during the zz? Do you do it always in the very same spot/place? Are you just standing or do you add some special concentrations?

What do you mean by "feeling odd"?

 

Leo

 

 

 

Is anyone familiar with side effects from zhan zhuang? I've noticed that if I'm going to feel side effects from any type of qigong, its this. I've noticed in particular that if I do the holding the ball position in front of chakras that I consider relatively weak, such as my solar plexus, that I feel very odd later. Is this a normal thing to get through or what?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there a law of diminishing returns at work here, ie does standing pay off big time at the beginning, and not so much later on?

ben

 

I wanted to address just this question. In my school we do not talk about Chi, chakras, MCO, or any of that stuff. My teacher says when people show signs of progression, he will discuss it. Since no one shows any signs, we don't talk about it.

 

With that out of the way, my teacher also says not to stand for the sake of standing. I had a post on Zhan Zhuang back in 2008. One of the members of this board who practices Yiquan challenged me to stand for 5 minutes in 8 postures. I don't think that person posts here regularly, but my Sifu has some not so nice words for this individual. Standing too long when you're not ready does not help you. If you carry tension, you will carry even more tension. Relaxed standing for 2 minutes it better than standing for 20 minutes with tension.

 

I am sure someone will object to what I've said. That is fine. We train for push hands competition, Sanda/Sanshou, and Shuai Jiao. If you have shoulder, back, and knee pains from standing too long, you will not be at your best to compete.

 

As far as how long should one stand, and a law of diminishing returns, I hold that there is one. However the longer one practices, the longer one is able to stand before it is no longer helpful. I mentioned that I stood 30 minutes in the morning and 40 minutes at night for several months-- this was not helping me because I was not relaxed. For now, anything past 15 minutes is a total waste.

 

My Sigung on the other hand...he stands for 6 hours a day. He has also been practicing Zhan Zhuang since my mother was in grade school.

 

Sorry for the long post, but just something I wanted to share.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The law of diminishing returns is always in effect, its just a matter of extent. As such, I agree with ya Prince.

 

Thanks for the good info, Leopoldson.

 

I've been practicing embryonic and reverse breathing as far as my sitting is concerned. I've also done a lot of sitting with just placing my awareness on the lower dan tien. In your experience, does one nourish Shen better than the other after cultivating Jing with standing?

 

Thanks!

Embryonic breathing can be done natural or reverse, its the focus of the practice that is key! How are you differentiating these three?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi dmattwads,

 

Do you practice daily? for what duration? Do you find it difficult? Do you feel tensed during the zz? Do you do it always in the very same spot/place? Are you just standing or do you add some special concentrations?

What do you mean by "feeling odd"?

 

Leo

 

Yes I pratice daily, and usually in the same spot. I do not find it difficult at all nor am I tense. The only concentration I have is if I'm holding the ball at a certain spot/leve I'd focus my breathing there. If I am in wuji posture on inhale I focus on my dan tien, and on exhale on the bottom of my feet. I've noticed that if I hold the ball for 5 min I generally feel ok, but if I try to do it for 10 min I feel odd.

When I say odd I mean that if I do hold the ball in front of a new area of my body, then I usually feel very tired, shaky, nervous, and feel strong emotions associated with that area. For example in "The Way of Energy" it starts you off holding the ball in front of your middle dan tien/heart chakra area (the book does not call it this, but that is where it is). I noticed that I began to get quite emotional and feel lots of hatred for no reason at all, I got very tired for a while, and felt just unusual. After a while these symptoms went away, though for a while I had stopped doing ZZ because it was to hard to deal with.

Last week I began holding the ball in front of my sacral chakra area, for a few days I got super horny all the time, it even woke me up at night, I got tired again. This week I have been doing it at my solar plexus, again feeling tired, shaky, nervous, angry, irritable, and realzing very acutely my self-esteem issues, and things like this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi dmattwads

 

First, change a little your location when you practice (1 or 2 yards/meters away from the spot you practice)- It may be that you stand in a place where there is geopathic stress. Also,ime practicing outdoors really makes a difference

 

Second,I don't know how much time you spent practicing the first position ( what Lam Kam Chuen names Wuji position with arms hanging on sides) but, if I were you, I would just begin anew with this posture until you reach 20 mn a day without doing any energy manipulation- just gently focusing on lower dan tian on each inspiration/expiration without involving sole breathing. LKC insists in his books that this posture is really important whatever level of practice you may reach there after.

 

When you have practiced wuji posture 20 mn a day for two or three weeks, you may do the third posture in Lam Kam Chuen's Way of energy with hands in front of lower dan tien and built until you progressively, and gently reach 20 mn a day- again without any energy circulation exercise- just gently placing your attention on lower dan tian.

 

And then you may go for the second posture( holding the ball in front of solar plexus)

 

I don't advise selecting a different posture on different days before having worked consistently with each of them nor adding some concentrations or energy circulation exercise unless you are explicitly following a method that recommend that. If you are following such a method (I mean different from LKC ), you may just follow the directions in the way it is presented without adding or changing anything.Particularly, I wouldn't mix zz with chakras concerns etc...Otherwise you may disturb your energetic system and face some troubles.

 

I am advising you all this this because:

- this is what I have done myself without any trouble.

- this is what I advised one person who had some trouble (feeling tired etc..) after the practice. When she began anew in a very progressive way, she stopped experiencing this troubles and found the practice beneficial.

 

 

If you choose to do that, let us know how it goes!

Thanks

Leo

 

 

Yes I pratice daily, and usually in the same spot. I do not find it difficult at all nor am I tense. The only concentration I have is if I'm holding the ball at a certain spot/leve I'd focus my breathing there. If I am in wuji posture on inhale I focus on my dan tien, and on exhale on the bottom of my feet. I've noticed that if I hold the ball for 5 min I generally feel ok, but if I try to do it for 10 min I feel odd.

When I say odd I mean that if I do hold the ball in front of a new area of my body, then I usually feel very tired, shaky, nervous, and feel strong emotions associated with that area. For example in "The Way of Energy" it starts you off holding the ball in front of your middle dan tien/heart chakra area (the book does not call it this, but that is where it is). I noticed that I began to get quite emotional and feel lots of hatred for no reason at all, I got very tired for a while, and felt just unusual. After a while these symptoms went away, though for a while I had stopped doing ZZ because it was to hard to deal with.

Last week I began holding the ball in front of my sacral chakra area, for a few days I got super horny all the time, it even woke me up at night, I got tired again. This week I have been doing it at my solar plexus, again feeling tired, shaky, nervous, angry, irritable, and realzing very acutely my self-esteem issues, and things like this.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Standing too long when you're not ready does not help you. If you carry tension, you will carry even more tension. Relaxed standing for 2 minutes it better than standing for 20 minutes with tension.

 

Sorry for the long post, but just something I wanted to share.

 

Prince makes a good point here about tension.

 

However my teachers (who are pretty old school, if you will) advocate for longer standing practice, with constant active focus of the mind on the body, scanning for tension, checking for posture, feeling for energy flow (without trying to direct energy flow, at least at the early stages of development). Personally I have found this route to be very rewarding, training the mind and very quickly moving though tension and blockages.

 

But if your mind is not strong enough to maintain this constant focus, back off, or you will mindlessly lock tension into your body, as Prince suggested.

 

Sifu Gregory Fong has a great article on ZZ practice, with a unique take that helped me immensely - he stays out of the realm of energy speak and even warns against focusing too much on relaxation - his approach is to train the mind to actively connect with and engage the correct muscles for standing, and using the mind to actively work and train these muscles. This in turn helps the other muscles in the body relax. The implication is that tension in the body comes from the body using the wrong muscles to stand/move, which in turn comes form the mind not being actively and correctly engaged in the body in the moment to provide the support the body needs to function at its best.

 

Here's a link:

http://i-chuan.net/download/ZhanZhuangFromAnIChuanPerspective.pdf

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

With that out of the way, my teacher also says not to stand for the sake of standing.

 

As far as how long should one stand, and a law of diminishing returns, I hold that there is one. However the longer one practices, the longer one is able to stand before it is no longer helpful. I mentioned that I stood 30 minutes in the morning and 40 minutes at night for several months-- this was not helping me because I was not relaxed. For now, anything past 15 minutes is a total waste.

.

 

Thank you for the information. I find that it takes me about 5-10 minutes to "settle" and at about the 20 minute mark I feel quite thoroughly relaxed. This is just WUJI standing, without adding any postures. I've gone up to an hour before and haven't felt any ill effects. Where is it that tension begins to build? In the hips?

 

What does your teacher mean when he says "do not stand for the sake of standing". I stand because it feels good and seems to be the most profound and simple practices I've ever encountered. I guess I just resonate with it.

 

Thank you for your reply.

 

ben

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the information. I find that it takes me about 5-10 minutes to "settle" and at about the 20 minute mark I feel quite thoroughly relaxed. This is just WUJI standing, without adding any postures. I've gone up to an hour before and haven't felt any ill effects. Where is it that tension begins to build? In the hips?

 

What does your teacher mean when he says "do not stand for the sake of standing". I stand because it feels good and seems to be the most profound and simple practices I've ever encountered. I guess I just resonate with it.

 

Thank you for your reply.

 

ben

 

Standing for the sake of standing means standing for the required 40 minutes just to say you did it. A lot of people don't like our school (my Sigung's school that is) because it takes a long time to get "the goods." We don't start learning the Yiquan in our system (which we just call Hsing-Yi) until someone can stand comfortably for at least 40 minutes.

 

I have the Lam Kam Chuen books, and his postures are a little different from ours. Our Hsing Yi comes from Han Xingyuen. I think Lam Kam Chuen gives great advice, and I was actually making great progress with his methods!

 

I will probably go back to lots of Wu Ji standing. I have always carried tension in my shoulders. Over the summer when I was doing a lot of Wu Ji in the mornings before Taiji practice, I actually felt my shoulder joint fall into place. (I injured it playing basketball 10 years ago)

 

Anyway, like my Sifu says, this is a marathon and not a sprint. Enjoy the ride. If you're interested in martial arts, the first time you feel peng will blow your mind. I admit that I'm not there yet, so I'm going to go read a book in my reading room (the bathroom haha) and do a little standing before bed. Every little bit adds up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites