Dev

Wuji Posture

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2 hours ago, freeform said:


Well - to be honest, I haven’t accessed them, so my understanding is only theoretical.

 

Not all alchemical paths use it. The ones that work extensively with Ling and the central channel tend to be the ones that do.

 

If you understand the central channel as a sort of leek with lots of layers - it’s your ability to penetrate through the layers into the very core that dictates if you’re able to access the chakra.

 

And penetrating to the core is a function of meditative concentration. Different depths of concentration give access to the different layers. The sort of concentration that is beyond the majority of meditators.

 

Actually ‘opening’ the chakra is exceptionally (and permanently) transformative in both one’s consciousness and physically. Transformative to an extent that it becomes nearly impossible to live a normal life in society.

 

What most people think as the chakra is usually simply Wei Qi - or sometimes the acupuncture points that often correlate.

 

The ‘true’ chakra exist on the preheaven level as far as I understand.

Thanks freeform that is really interesting and fascinating!!! Thanks for your sharing. 🙏

 

I have never heard that before even though i got teachings on different levels within the chakra and that its core is the "real deal" so to say.

 

Do you use them in your school?

What  kind of transformation do you think about when you say "one would have to leave society"?

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On 08/09/2021 at 5:08 PM, Master Logray said:

I think unless one is a scholar doing study, it is better for the usual people to concentrate on actual practice than spending time on which is which.

 

Yeah that's probably a good point. I just find it fascinating though, and want to expand my knowledge, while focusing on practice from a single tradition. I like hearing what different people have to say, I am a scholar (I do take religious studies just not as a major), so I do still take what people say with a pinch of salt (freeform and various others encouraged me to do that as well). Mostly I'm just interested in the theory behind it as a side project for interest's sake. I like researching and learning stuff :) 

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2 hours ago, freeform said:

Ling

What exactly is ling?

 

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1 hour ago, MIchael80 said:

Do you use them in your school?


Im not actually sure - it’s not really part of the golden embryo type work - but then again my teacher taught us about it on a theoretical level - and he doesn’t normally teach anything redundant.

 

Maybe it’s something people bump into at some point whether it’s part of the mechanics of the specific path or not?

 

1 hour ago, MIchael80 said:

What  kind of transformation do you think about when you say "one would have to leave society"?


Oh as I understand it there are stages where for instance you experience oneness to a very deep level - but permanently… it’s not a meditative experience - it’s all the time, you simply can’t tell the difference between you and that rock or the ocean or that guy over there… it’s difficult to place your body in space - it’s like your experience of your toe and the sun are just as ‘personal’. When dealing with people, you become that person - you experience their full personality and karma all at once… the separation between what is you and what is not you disappears.

 

It becomes impossible to do any work, or to relate to people normally or pay your bills and so on. Sort of akin to serious brain damage.

 

From what I understand the transformation does settle and becomes navigable - but your experience is permanently altered. It is said that this is where some of the pretty out there siddhi start to manifest (like being in two places at once, teleporting and so on).

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1 hour ago, Dev said:

What exactly is ling?


It’s a kind of spiritual essence - called the magical spirit… it’s spirit that is heading in the direction of manifestation rather than the unmanifest.

 

That’s the best I can do in a nutshell :) 

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8 hours ago, freeform said:

Oh as I understand it there are stages where for instance you experience oneness to a very deep level - but permanently… it’s not a meditative experience - it’s all the time, you simply can’t tell the difference between you and that rock or the ocean or that guy over there… it’s difficult to place your body in space - it’s like your experience of your toe and the sun are just as ‘personal’. When dealing with people, you become that person - you experience their full personality and karma all at once… the separation between what is you and what is not you disappears.


What an odd, almost unsettling idea, that a master like this could experience 'you' more deeply than you yourself do (ie. your full karma, unconscious, etc. what we normally don't even know ourselves)...

🤯

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13 hours ago, freeform said:

When dealing with people, you become that person - you experience their full personality and karma all at once… the separation between what is you and what is not you disappears

I can relate to this... A couple years ago I was on mescaline at a festival, and I became so insanely connected to my surroundings that I had to be alone for hours. Every time a person came near me I would become them, I'd be thinking their thoughts, feeling their emotions. I would get completely absorbed into them and their karma. It was really difficult, I couldn't be around my friends or anyone, just had to hermit out for a bit until I wasn't tripping as hard. I can imagine if it was like that but x100, it would be seriously hard to live in society with so many people

 

Edit: What made it even harder was that i could see what everyone was struggling with, I was thinking their thoughts, feeling their conflicts (especially other people having difficulties in their trips) I wanted to help them to resolve their karma, to show them what they were doing and thinking that was generating karma but I couldn't - they wouldn't understand, and I couldn't speak

Edited by Dev

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17 hours ago, Dev said:

 I am a scholar (I do take religious studies just not as a major), so I do still take what people say with a pinch of salt (freeform and various others encouraged me to do that as well). Mostly I'm just interested in the theory behind it as a side project for interest's sake. I like researching and learning stuff :) 

 

OK, theory and history for scholar.  China martial arts, just like any others, train the muscle, bones, tendons, speed, strength, flexibility, skills...   They are all externally visible - so the term Wai Gong (external gong). 

 

In the arm race, martial artists need to further their arsenals, like shields for weak spots in the body, ability to move the shields, how to jump/levitate a long or high distance,  how to heal fast, how to use your force without being sensed, how to prevent the organs from concussions.....   These are generally termed Nei Gong (the inner gong) because they are not really externally conspicuous, involve the inner body and often trained in secret.   They come from a variety of techniques, medicines and secrets.   To quote an example, hanging a rock under the testicles is a famous technique demonstrating the potency of Nei Gong.

 

Nei Gong by definition doesn't necessary related to Chi.  But somehow most of the techniques involves Chi to varying extents.  This brings Neigong close to its Taoist brothers - the Neidan and even TCM.  Some Neigong exercises can be used for Neidan, many masters know both and integrate them together.   Neidanists also practise Waigong and Neigong as personal security system. 

 

For those like philosophical Taoism, WaiGong is more Yang and Neigong is more Yin, outer and inner.

 

Since Neigong has it martial arts roots, it is not Neidan.  e.g. by sending or activating Chi to the belly, the punch of the enemy can be stopped or even bounced back.  It has to be done in an instant.  While Neidan prefers slowness, and let the Chi flow naturally, non-intervention.   Overall speaking,  a Neidanist is not supposed to be involved in a fighting situation in the first place and habitually thinking of attack and defence in the deep meditation is to be avoided.  

 

Nowadays, both are lumped under Chi Kung from 1950s onward. 

 

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43 minutes ago, Master Logray said:

Since Neigong has it martial arts roots, it is not Neidan.

 

 

Neigong as a term is basically 'internal skill'.

 

There is neigong for martial arts and there's neigong for spiritual development - and they are different. (there's also neigong for inserting acupuncture needles, there's neigong for writing caligraphy, there's neigong for playing music etc)

 

The Neigong that's used to lead into spiritual growth is based on the principles of these two classics: Yi Jing Jin (the sinew changing classic) and the Xi Sui Jing (the marrow washing classic). In reality there is no manuscript that shows the original text... it has largely been passed down through apprenticeships with teachers - and occasionally written down (often with many additions and subtractions).

 

Practically speaking these classics are focused on transforming the body and mind - on a physical and energetic level. The principles (particularly YJJ) were incorporated into various traditions - including Shaolin, various Daoist lines as well as 'internal' martial arts.

 

It indeed is not Neidan - though the majority of effective (IMO) Neidan lineages absorbed the processes of the YJJ and XSJ into their training. They are usually considered the foundation - the 'preparatory' work that makes Neidan possible. Neidan itself is quite different - though related.

 

The principles in the YJJ and XSJ are not specific exercises, but principles that transform the body and mind when put into action. The principles are used in countless exercises. Because they're used in different exercises and methods they change considerably...

 

For instance if you use the principles for Taiji, then you don't really need a dantien - at least not the same dantien as you need for Neidan. The principles when applied to Taiji create a certain kind of body... the same principles used in Xing Yi or Bagua create different sorts of internal bodies. And it goes to an even more granular level - Yang Taiji uses the principles differently to Chen... and two teachers within a Chen tradition will use them slightly differently yet again.

 

The same is true of all the more spiritually oriented and health oriented methods and traditions.

 

That's why Neigong is not one thing.

 

People fight over what Neigong is because they've understood it from one perspective... but in reality it's very varied.

 

And just to set the cat among the pigeons - the true understanding of the application of YJJ and XSJ have been largely lost.

 

Most of what you find in public is just 'dress-up'... kinda like most commercial yoga, just a bit more niche and 'culturally' focused... It's about dressing a certain way, preserving (the appearances of) tradition etc - but the real 'effectiveness' was lost many years ago, and most consider the results of such training the stuff of legends and superstition. :ph34r:

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10 minutes ago, freeform said:

 

 

Neigong as a term is basically 'internal skill'.

 

There is neigong for martial arts and there's neigong for spiritual development - and they are different. (there's also neigong for inserting acupuncture needles, there's neigong for writing caligraphy, there's neigong for playing music etc)

 

The Neigong that's used to lead into spiritual growth is based on the principles of these two classics: Yi Jing Jin (the sinew changing classic) and the Xi Sui Jing (the marrow washing classic). In reality there is no manuscript that shows the original text... it has largely been passed down through apprenticeships with teachers - and occasionally written down (often with many additions and subtractions).

 

Practically speaking these classics are focused on transforming the body and mind - on a physical and energetic level. The principles (particularly YJJ) were incorporated into various traditions - including Shaolin, various Daoist lines as well as 'internal' martial arts.

 

It indeed is not Neidan - though the majority of effective (IMO) Neidan lineages absorbed the processes of the YJJ and XSJ into their training. They are usually considered the foundation - the 'preparatory' work that makes Neidan possible. Neidan itself is quite different - though related.

 

The principles in the YJJ and XSJ are not specific exercises, but principles that transform the body and mind when put into action. The principles are used in countless exercises. Because they're used in different exercises and methods they change considerably...

 

For instance if you use the principles for Taiji, then you don't really need a dantien - at least not the same dantien as you need for Neidan. The principles when applied to Taiji create a certain kind of body... the same principles used in Xing Yi or Bagua create different sorts of internal bodies. And it goes to an even more granular level - Yang Taiji uses the principles differently to Chen... and two teachers within a Chen tradition will use them slightly differently yet again.

 

The same is true of all the more spiritually oriented and health oriented methods and traditions.

 

That's why Neigong is not one thing.

 

People fight over what Neigong is because they've understood it from one perspective... but in reality it's very varied.

 

And just to set the cat among the pigeons - the true understanding of the application of YJJ and XSJ have been largely lost.

 

Most of what you find in public is just 'dress-up'... kinda like most commercial yoga, just a bit more niche and 'culturally' focused... It's about dressing a certain way, preserving (the appearances of) tradition etc - but the real 'effectiveness' was lost many years ago, and most consider the results of such training the stuff of legends and superstition. :ph34r:

 

Not to mention those who try to take a Unitarian Church kind of approach where someone can say "All is Dao and nobody has authority on Dao" which actually can be detrimental to understanding Dao due to the fact that it uses the same terminology, but its framework and philosophy is not Daoism but very distinctly capitalistic New Age rather than just New Age...

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18 hours ago, freeform said:

Oh as I understand it there are stages where for instance you experience oneness to a very deep level - but permanently… it’s not a meditative experience - it’s all the time, you simply can’t tell the difference between you and that rock or the ocean or that guy over there… it’s difficult to place your body in space - it’s like your experience of your toe and the sun are just as ‘personal’. When dealing with people, you become that person - you experience their full personality and karma all at once… the separation between what is you and what is not you disappears.

 

It becomes impossible to do any work, or to relate to people normally or pay your bills and so on. Sort of akin to serious brain damage.

 

From what I understand the transformation does settle and becomes navigable - but your experience is permanently altered. It is said that this is where some of the pretty out there siddhi start to manifest (like being in two places at once, teleporting and so on).

This is how my nonduality teachers describe their experience, except without the siddhis like being in two places it once, or full knowledge of a person's karma (beyond just experiencing people as themself).  Do you suppose that someone who had attained what you describe in a past life could awaken to that type of consciousness without the intensive samadhi/jhana work in their current life, and hence not possess those siddhis?

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1 hour ago, Creation said:

This is how my nonduality teachers describe their experience, except without the siddhis like being in two places it once, or full knowledge of a person's karma (beyond just experiencing people as themself).

 

I've had an experience sort of like that for a period of a couple of hours...

 

What's difficult is that when you have these sorts of experiences they feel 'complete' in and of themselves - as in it appears as if there cannot possibly be a more complete feeling. How can something that's complete be 'even more' complete?

 

What I experienced was quite navigatable - I felt 'one' in the sense that there was no separation between 'me' and 'not me' and everything felt connected like a single organism. I could talk and communicate easily - I could recall things and so on.

 

But looking back, the reality is that although everything felt one and complete, it was always in relation to where my perception could reach.

 

From what I understood of my teacher's description, what's experienced when one of the chakra fully opens is a whole different thing. There is no limit in terms of perception...

 

As in, right now you or I could intimately feel the sense of our right thumb - its location in space, the temperature around it, the texture of the air or the surface it's touching... whether there's a breeze, or some sort of air pressure across it... Well imagine feeling a mountain you've never seen to the same level of intimacy... or the sun... or a person's identity, someone who you've never met, and who isn't even alive yet...

 

As I understand it, that's the beginning of what my teacher called omniscience. You're able to perceive anything that ever was or ever will be perceived - intimately... as in you could literally know in an instant what my grandad looked like (having never met me or my grandad, obviously). It's all 'accurate' and not vague - it's not based on just feelings - you can get any form of information at whatever level of details you'd like from any time past, present or future... It's like your consciousness becomes one with all of consciousness - but literally, not figuratively... and it's not limited by your local perception - it's everything everywhere at once...

 

Obviously there's a long period of adjustment - at first, as I understand it, it's almost painfully disorienting.

 

When another chakra opens, this sort of omniscience expands from the finer immaterial realm into physicality - resulting in what you might call 'omnipotence'... which is where the weird teleportation, bilocation, walking through walls type stuff just becomes an extension of what's possible.

 

So it may be that what your nondual teachers experience is akin to a more permanent version of what I experienced temporarily... How it happens, from my understanding is that it happens spontaneously of its own accord, as an act of sudden 'letting go'.

 

What causes you to let go like this? It can be the qualities built through diligent practice - in this life or another... or it can be just an accident... or a near death experience... there's no 'method' or technique to make it happen... the methods or techniques just lay the groundwork for it to occur of its own accord.

 

But from what I understand, this awakening (even if permanent) isn't the main goal of Daoism - though clearly an important stage. I know my life changed when I had a glimpse of it. The siddhis and all that stuff are a result of this awakening becoming ever more complete at different levels.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Earl Grey said:

 

Not to mention those who try to take a Unitarian Church kind of approach where someone can say "All is Dao and nobody has authority on Dao" which actually can be detrimental to understanding Dao due to the fact that it uses the same terminology, but its framework and philosophy is not Daoism but very distinctly capitalistic New Age rather than just New Age...

 

People, when mired in the drama of the self will naturally gravitate to the bits of philosophy or religion or spiritual practice that serves the aspect of self that is most 'sticky' for them.

 

For many it's sex... so they act on everything that's to do with sex in Daoism or Tantra and conveniently ignore the rest... For some it's status - so they'll 'discover' a new method... or 'improve' a spiritual practice by combining lots of things... their intention may seem good to them - but in reality its just a way for them to make themselves more important.

 

I think that most people are good, have good intentions and generally want the best for others.

 

The issues tend to come about when there's additional 'power'. Whether it's internal power (extra Qi) or external power (money, fame, social status) - this extra power has the potential to fuel those aspects of ourselves that have remained dormant whilst we didn't have the extra power.

 

The issue is that this stuff can be insidious - you don't necessarily notice it happening... you may well be healing hundreds of people with the best of intentions... then ten years down the line, after all the adulation and respect you've been getting, you find that you deserve to be paid exorbitant amounts - they're wasting their money anyway... having sex with your students is a benevolent act - they're lucky to be getting so much extra attention from you... etc etc...

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On 9/10/2021 at 6:55 AM, freeform said:

neigong for writing caligraphy, there's neigong for playing music

 

Direction towards this sort of training system would be appreciated. 

 

My motivation to work with an Alexander technique instructor years ago involved long hours at musical tasks of one sort and another. ( originally developed as a therapy for the voice as much as body usage, it was well suited to my needs at the time)

 

My current practice has certainly had an effect on my sense of " body time" and of my " vocal hearth" and the rest in interesting ways. I don't spend the long hours on musical "heavy lifting" these days, but as a way to integrate my overall efforts, this sounds worth asking about.

 

 

Edited by Sketch

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1 minute ago, Sketch said:

Direction towards this sort of training systems would be appreciated. 

 

 

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On 10/09/2021 at 2:27 PM, Master Logray said:

 

OK, theory and history for scholar.  China martial arts, just like any others, train the muscle, bones, tendons, speed, strength, flexibility, skills...   They are all externally visible - so the term Wai Gong (external gong). 

 

In the arm race, martial artists need to further their arsenals, like shields for weak spots in the body, ability to move the shields, how to jump/levitate a long or high distance,  how to heal fast, how to use your force without being sensed, how to prevent the organs from concussions.....   These are generally termed Nei Gong (the inner gong) because they are not really externally conspicuous, involve the inner body and often trained in secret.   They come from a variety of techniques, medicines and secrets.   To quote an example, hanging a rock under the testicles is a famous technique demonstrating the potency of Nei Gong.

 

Nei Gong by definition doesn't necessary related to Chi.  But somehow most of the techniques involves Chi to varying extents.  This brings Neigong close to its Taoist brothers - the Neidan and even TCM.  Some Neigong exercises can be used for Neidan, many masters know both and integrate them together.   Neidanists also practise Waigong and Neigong as personal security system. 

 

For those like philosophical Taoism, WaiGong is more Yang and Neigong is more Yin, outer and inner.

 

Since Neigong has it martial arts roots, it is not Neidan.  e.g. by sending or activating Chi to the belly, the punch of the enemy can be stopped or even bounced back.  It has to be done in an instant.  While Neidan prefers slowness, and let the Chi flow naturally, non-intervention.   Overall speaking,  a Neidanist is not supposed to be involved in a fighting situation in the first place and habitually thinking of attack and defence in the deep meditation is to be avoided.  

 

Nowadays, both are lumped under Chi Kung from 1950s onward. 

 

Very interesting, thanks for the insight :) I've heard the term waigong being thrown around a bit, but its definition seems to have gone over my head? What exactly is it, and how does it differ from neigong?

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1 hour ago, Dev said:

I've heard the term waigong being thrown around a bit, but its definition seems to have gone over my head? What exactly is it, and how does it differ from neigong?

Wai = External / Exterior / Outside

Gong = quality or skill

 

So Wai Gong (external gong) as quoted refers in this context to building things on the outside... so muscle, tendons, bones etc, and also working on external qualities that one could easily see.. speed, strength, muscle definition etc.

 

Nei Gong (internal art/skill) / Nei Dan (internal alchemy) on the other hand works from the inside to the out, hence being considered an internal art or skill.. Simplified, generally they work from the level of Qi, Qi channels, huang/sinew channels, to tendons, then muscles and then branches out to the most external aspects of the body. 

 

So in general, Wai Gong in this context can be considered as working at transforming the more dense aspects and levels of the body (think Asian martial arts, kung fu, karate, muay thai etc or in a western context, bodybuilding), and the nei gong/dan works from the internal and more subtle aspects of the body and aims to transform things at this deeper level, which then branches out to the external/exterior aspects of the body

 

Different people have different definitions for each of these terms though

Edited by refugeindharma
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40 minutes ago, refugeindharma said:

Wai = External / Exterior / Outside

Gong = quality or skill

 

So Wai Gong (external gong) as quoted refers in this context to building things on the outside... so muscle, tendons, bones etc, and also working on external qualities that one could easily see.. speed, strength, muscle definition etc.

 

Nei Gong (internal art/skill) / Nei Dan (internal alchemy) on the other hand works from the inside to the out, hence being considered an internal art or skill.. Simplified, generally they work from the level of Qi, Qi channels, huang/sinew channels, to tendons, then muscles and then branches out to the most external aspects of the body. 

 

So in general, Wai Gong in this context can be considered as working at transforming the more dense aspects and levels of the body (think Asian martial arts, kung fu, karate, muay thai etc or in a western context, bodybuilding), and the nei gong/dan works from the internal and more subtle aspects of the body and aims to transform things at this deeper level, which then branches out to the external/exterior aspects of the body

 

Different people have different definitions for each of these terms though

Ahh thanks, that was very helpful

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On 10/09/2021 at 7:47 PM, freeform said:

The issues tend to come about when there's additional 'power'. Whether it's internal power (extra Qi) or external power (money, fame, social status) - this extra power has the potential to fuel those aspects of ourselves that have remained dormant whilst we didn't have the extra power.

I feel that's the reason that one should do shadow work while/before practicing neigong and other similar practices. I get the feeling that relying on clearing your energy systems and building qi to clear your mental blockages and insecurities won't really work too well, or is unreliable. Ya gotta focus on both sides of the coin. That's more or less why I wanted to do a cleansing and shadow work journey before i even properly get into neigong, so that I know exactly how my insecurities manifest etc. Also glad that I already kind of built a foundation around various other spiritual/shamanic practices that focus on shadow work, integration, introspection and reaching inner peace before learning about neigong

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Today when I was practicing wuji, I started shaking, like a lot. I noticed that today I managed to drop my pelvis and tailbone much more effectively than before, I could really feel it 'sinking' into my body. Also managed to use my kua much much more effectively today, could feel it in the exact areas that damo described. Is the shaking a good/bad sign? I've heard people  mentioning it before. It was a very interesting feeling, like spontaneous energy arising in different places. The more in-position i was, the more i shook (e.g shook way harder when sinking pelvis and tailbone)

 

Edit: I'm referring specifically to Damos system here :)

Edited by Dev

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47 minutes ago, Dev said:

Is the shaking a good/bad sign? I've heard people  mentioning it before. It was a very interesting feeling, like spontaneous energy arising in different places. The more in-position i was, the more i shook (e.g shook way harder when sinking pelvis and tailbone)

 

Ask your instructor or specify that it's for someone who specifically practices from Damo.

 

In our own system, no, this is not good, and while it's usually a sign of opening channels in the beginning, you should eventually strive for complete stillness. 

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5 minutes ago, Earl Grey said:

 

Ask your instructor or specify that it's for someone who specifically practices from Damo.

 

In our own system, no, this is not good, and while it's usually a sign of opening channels in the beginning, you should eventually strive for complete stillness. 

Still busy processing payment, not able to contact them properly yet. But you're right, I'm going to edit it to include damo. And this is only my 5th or so time doing wuji

 

Edit: I will definitely ask damo asap, just making sure I'm not doing something horribly wrong in the meantime

Edited by Dev

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2 hours ago, Dev said:

Edit: I'm referring specifically to Damos system here :)


(I learned effectively the same early stages that Damo teaches (but from a different teacher from the same lineage))

 

2 hours ago, Dev said:

Is the shaking a good/bad sign? I've heard people  mentioning it before.


The shaking is normal, yes - it’s expected - especially as you’ve only done 5 sessions. (Remember that it takes effectively thousands of hours of wuji standing to get it ‘right’ - and even then there are always refinements). As you actively release more and the deeper muscles get used to the standing, things will change.

 

3 hours ago, Dev said:

I feel that's the reason that one should do shadow work while/before practicing neigong and other similar practices. I get the feeling that relying on clearing your energy systems and building qi to clear your mental blockages and insecurities won't really work too well, or is unreliable.


You’ll find all sorts of stuff inside you as you begin opening up energetically. Stuff you never knew was there.

 

Being attentive to your actions and interactions with others as well as cultivating kindness, humility and a bit of humour (not taking your’self’ too seriously) is what helps a lot.

 

Im sure Damo’s system includes stuff on ethics and processes to align the quality of your mind down the line.

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23 hours ago, Sketch said:

Direction towards this sort of training system would be appreciated. 


Im afraid I don’t know any books or anything like that.

 

I’ve worked with a pianist friend who does some Neigong training.

 

His body is starting to connect together and we’ve been exploring how he can play ‘spontaneously’… it’s a little messy and all over the place at the moment (he’s a professional concert pianist - and a master of his craft).

 

He did manage to connect to a layer of his central channel and managed to express it through his fingers - and it was powerfully moving to listen to - but still a bit rough.

 

The main thing is developing the Dantien and building connection through the body… this takes a lot of standing. He also needed to do a lot of moving and releasing through the hands to release tons of tension stored there.
 

Unfortunately this had a negative impact to his ‘normal’ playing - luckily he’s not had a professional concert since the start of the pandemic. 
 

But he says that as things are opening up he’s finding more grace and ease in his hands… and is quickly regaining his dexterity from this newfound space.

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7 minutes ago, freeform said:


 

 

Unfortunately this had a negative impact to his ‘normal’ playing - luckily he’s not had a professional concert since the start of the pandemic. 
 

 

Very much in similar straights.

 

I keep in touch with my repertoire,  but my relationship to that material has changed.

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