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For as long as I can recall... cats in my life.

I was born able to speak their language it seems.

I just always get them.

 

Unmatched masters of mindfulness/presence and emptiness/release in my experience.

 

5db0ac9b36857_Snow-Leopardstare.thumb.jpg.012324d9d6341dab199bea61ef0f4fea.jpgWhen I see cats with my external eyes.

 

This is often my internal experience...

6004592d9e7ef_thirdeyecatspirit.thumb.jpg.5fac51411dafd61540e7690f118f5db4.jpg

 

 

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I can eat the big ones but miss out on the mice since my teeth really get in the way....

saber-toothed-tiger-cindy-manero.jpg.9380035e21349f6439932a8ddf64fb8e.jpg

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57 minutes ago, old3bob said:

I can eat the big ones but miss out on the mice since my teeth really get in the way....

saber-toothed-tiger-cindy-manero.jpg.9380035e21349f6439932a8ddf64fb8e.jpg

 

I used to have a cat who always ate wet food by picking it up with his paw and putting it in his mouth, rather than sticking his face in it.  I never understood it but now you got me thinking that it may have been genetic memory of how the sabertooth snacked on mice. 

 

I had another cat who didn't eat dry food except if you threw a crunchy across the room for her to chase, which she did at top speed.  It was entertainment for her rather than food, but it was her absolute favorite game.  

 

Mice are the most widely eaten species on Earth.  Everything hunts for them, snakes, birds, felines, canines, pigs, bats, even some insects and quite a few spiders.  And yet, so far, they managed to survive for 65 million years.  If I was one of those scientists who perform "studies" on them toward conclusions they proceed to apply to humans, I'd stop cutting them up, poisoning them, splicing them with glowing jellyfish and human ears and what not, and instead let them all go and then dedicate all that multibillion dollar effort to studying their survival strategies in the real world.  

 

  

Edited by Taomeow
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could be the genetic memory?   Anyway it seems those size of teeth are a little overkill but evolution had a reason for it back then... 

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Amur Forest Cat

A rare endangered species.  Picture taken in January 2021 near Vladivostok, Russia.

 

 

141655735_3610222035727632_7510629289466376561_o.jpg?_nc_cat=110&ccb=2&_nc_sid=b9115d&_nc_ohc=mgus-QxjsxwAX_dE13w&_nc_ht=scontent-lax3-1.xx&tp=7&oh=b6dcc6f97487867de7cb75b66606095c&oe=603BE7D7

 

Image may contain: outdoor and nature

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5 hours ago, Shevek said:

wildcat.jpg.454fa309d990ab8668bc8116d5d23011.jpg

 

It is estimated only 35 pure-bred Scottish wildcats may be left in the wild.

https://www.wildcathaven.com/scottish-wildcat

 

 

I've read that the reason they are almost gone is that they interbreed with domestic cats and produce fertile offspring, so living close to human dwellings (where domestic cats are ubiquitous) dilutes their genetic pool more and more.  Of course the main factor is the shrinking habitat...  like for all other wild creatures displaced by the expansionist pest humanity has been transmogrified into by "civilization."  Some program to restore their population would be great though...  It worked (at least to an extent, at least for now) for the Siberian (Amur) tiger -- a hundred years ago there were only 60 left,  in the 1940s the population dropped to half that, but today there's about 580.  This is not a high number nor a low one -- what's left of the territory they once inhabited (7% of it, the rest having been rendered uninhabitable for tigers) can only accommodate about as many...

 

Image result for amur tiger

 

 

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1 hour ago, Taomeow said:

 

I've read that the reason they are almost gone is that they interbreed with domestic cats and produce fertile offspring, so living close to human dwellings (where domestic cats are ubiquitous) dilutes their genetic pool more and more.  Of course the main factor is the shrinking habitat...  like for all other wild creatures displaced by the expansionist pest humanity has been transmogrified into by "civilization."  Some program to restore their population would be great though...  It worked (at least to an extent, at least for now) for the Siberian (Amur) tiger -- a hundred years ago there were only 60 left,  in the 1940s the population dropped to half that, but today there's about 580.  This is not a high number nor a low one -- what's left of the territory they once inhabited (7% of it, the rest having been rendered uninhabitable for tigers) can only accommodate about as many...

 

Image result for amur tiger

 

 

 

 

Quote

The wildcat is considered an icon of the Scottish wilderness and has been used in clan heraldry since the 13th century.  The Picts venerated the wildcats, having probably named Caithness (Land of the Cats) after them. According to the myth, the ancestors of the Catti tribe were attacked by wildcats upon landing in Scotland.  Their ferocity impressed the Catti so much that the wildcat became their symbol.  A thousand years later the progenitors of Clan Sutherland, equally impressed, adopted the wildcat on their family crest.  The Chief of the Clan Sutherland bears the title Morair Chat (Great Man of the Cats).  The Clan Chattan Association (also known as the Clan of Cats) is made up of 12 different clans, the majority of which display the wildcat on their badges.

 

 

macpherson_emblem.gif.646b7b79fb10888d871b78a8b28a5725.gif

 

 

I hope the 'Scottish tigers' survive, like the Siberian ones. There are many conservation initiatives in Scotland now, and even proposals to reintroduce the lynx. The wildcats really are wild and untameable, famous for their ferocity and independence.

 

When I was young I read the book "Ring of Bright Water" by Gavin Maxwell, an autobiographical account of when he lived in a remote part of Scotland and kept otters as pets. He rescued a wildcat kitten, and it bit his thumb, biting right through the thumbnail.

 

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A black panther in India

 

To me this kitty looks like a working model of our yin-yang universe

 

 May be an image of animal, tree and nature

Edited by Taomeow
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These ones  'jumped out at me ' 

 

 

Jaguarondi

f5e8d3e2c17e9ba6c297f03f197f4304.png

 

 

and this clouded leopard ... what a coat ! 

 

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 and a Canadian lynx , out for a walk with her snow boots on

 

 

 

 

maxresdefault.jpg

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12 minutes ago, silent thunder said:

Wow... who added the terrible photoblob of the man to that lynx pic?  lol!  nice shadow matching.

 

Yeah, at first glance I couldn't fathom what kind of mandanimal* a lynx the size of a lioness might be.  :) 

 

*mandanimal -- a term people use to describe animals attributed to the so-called "Mandela effect," which are not indigenous either to the current timeline or to the timeline of the persons switched to this one from different ones.   

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What's up with you two ?

 

You never seen a small man and a large cat together before  ?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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i-always-thought-he-was-taller

Edited by Nungali
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Posted (edited)

A  bad hair day.   

 Serval mom evacuates her kittens from an inundated den in the Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya. 


May be an image of big cat and nature

Edited by Taomeow
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