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Himalayan Lynx ( (Lynx lynx isabellinus)

Photo Credit: CGNP, Camera trap clicks.

Chitral Gol National Park, Pakistan

 

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Black-footed cat, the smallest of African cats and the deadliest of all felines.  It weighs from 2.4 to 4.2 lb and catches more prey in a single night than a leopard does in six months. 

 

 

 

Image may contain: cat

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Some bobcats in Kentucky are the size of a coyote. Black panthers, mountain lions are here too. Down in Tennessee, folks are allowed to keep just about any animal; certainly, bears, wolves, big cats. Some animals escape or are let loose; one could encounter a tiger in the forest. There are bobcats that hang out with people not very different than a typical house cat. I’m thinking of inviting one to join my circle, there is the difference that a bobcat has the skill and capability to take out a human, but they don’t ever. I know of bobcats coexisting in harmony right alongside dogs on some backwoods homesteads. 
 

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not wild but it seems covid could get into wild cats...

 

"Three snow leopards at the Louisville Zoo in Kentucky tested positive for COVID-19 Friday, marking the sixth animal species to be infected with the highly-contagious virus after contact with humans.

 

The zoo said two males and a female contracted the virus and that their symptoms are currently "mild" and include wheezing and dry coughing. All three are anticipated to make a full recovery. No other animals at the zoo are exhibiting symptoms.

 

"Recently our zookeepers noticed that our snow leopards ... were showing minor respiratory symptoms, including an occasional dry cough and wheezing. We acted immediately and had samples sent to veterinary diagnostic experts for testing," said Louisville Zoo director John Walczak. "Today we learned that our snow leopards had tested positive for the COVID virus."

 

Despite the leopards' diagnoses, it is unlikely they pose a significant risk to zoo visitors given that the coronavirus is rarely spread between species and is most commonly transmitted between humans.

At least six animal species are known to have contracted the virus after exposure to humans, including tigers, lions, cats and dogs. The virus is rarely lethal in animals, though thousands of mink have died after outbreaks at U.S. fur farms."

 

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This is an African leopard I photographed on a trip to Masai Mara in Kenya back in 2018. Apparently it was a big deal to get to see a wild leopard.

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This one's from when we came upon a few lions during mating season --

 

IMG_3667

 

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6 minutes ago, Taomeow said:

@dwai  Lucky you!

I consider myself very lucky indeed to be able to visit Kenya and Tanzania. If I can, will go again. I didn't want to come back  :D 

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This cat, named Larry, is not wild.  On the contrary, he's a government official.  His title is The Chief Mouser to the Cabinet Office of the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom at 10 Downing Street.

 

Rumor has it that in his official capacity Larry is as inefficient, lazy, and self-serving as the rest of the government.  Which makes sense -- how could they possibly tolerate the presence of a public servant who'd continuously shame the rest of them with his competence and dedication to the task.

 

Larry Chief Mouser.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Taomeow
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