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14 hours ago, steve said:

One of my favorite dance moments in film!

 

 

 

Yes, joy and connection!

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14 hours ago, steve said:

Some neo-swing...

 

 

 

And a little shuffle!

 

 

 

Those electro swing dancers were so much fun!  Dancing at the urinal was hilarious and of course the shuffle dancer in short pants was attention grabbing, Ahem:rolleyes:

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I am so glad I did this thread! You guys are great! I have been having a lot of fun here!

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Posted (edited)
54 minutes ago, moment said:

 

Those electro swing dancers were so much fun!  Dancing at the urinal was hilarious and of course the shuffle dancer in short pants was attention grabbing, Ahem:rolleyes:

 

I debated whether to post that.

The cheeks are a little risqué but her flow is just sublime.

PS - happy to remove if anyone finds it objectionable (feel free to PM)

Edited by steve

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Nureyev

 

 


I saw a lesser known artist (Mel Tomlinson, friend of my brother) dance this part and literally transformed into the faun. It has stayed with me for 30 years.

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47 minutes ago, steve said:

Nureyev

 

 


I saw a lesser known artist (Mel Tomlinson, friend of my brother) dance this part and literally transformed into the faun. It has stayed with me for 30 years.

 

I have a painting of the great Nureyev in my home.

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I had the pleasure of TY Pang's company in Seattle a long time ago.

Edited by moment
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Tarantella

 

First recorded in the 15th century, the tarantella gets its name from an Italian wolf spider referred to as a “tarantula.” Muscle spasms, delirium, and death were associated with its bite. Legend has it the sweaty, gyrating dance developed to flush the toxin out of the body. Musicians wandered fields expecting pay to play for the plagued. This upbeat tambourine grove soon became the iconic dance of Southern Italy.

This cure remained in place for 300 years until people began to investigate. British playwright Oliver Goldsmith forced his servant to be bitten by one of the spiders. He discovered that the bite only caused minor swelling around the wound. A 17th-century Italian doctor concluded that tarantism was a “feigned activity of malingerers.” The tarantula was not the culprit; people just needed to vent. Others theorize that the tarantella may have developed with a Dionysian cult that was forced underground.

 

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In Algonquin, “wendigo” translates roughly to “the evil spirit that devours mankind.” According to legend, these emaciated monsters with matted hair and decaying skin were made when a person cannibalized another. They became transformed into a wendigo with an insatiable appetite for human flesh.

The Cree developed a dance to help them deal with the nightmare of these cannibalistic creatures. The Wihtikokansimoowin involves satirical portrayals of the man-eating monster and valiant portrayals of wendigo hunters. Legend holds that the Cree’s “Wendigo-like Dance” was performed during periods of famine to reinforce the gravity of their cannibalism taboo.

Conceived in a dream, the dance was first performed by the Assiniboine tribe. The Cree eventually adopted it and incorporated it into their Sun Dance ritual. It is always performed on the last day of the celebration. The last known Wihtikokansimoowin in the United States occurred at Leech Lake Indian Reservation in Northern Minnesota.

 

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