waterdrop

Feng shui of the practice and its effect on the practice

Recommended Posts

how much effect does feng shui has on a persons practice ? 

I am talking about   the effect of the feng shui of the place where he "trains"  meditation/qigong   ? 

can feng shui change a place so that 1 hour of qigong practice in it is worth 10   hours in another place ? 100 hours ? 10000 hours ?

how to make a place have effect on the practice ?  

what are the "strongest"  effect feng shui places  -  in general  ( forest , river , beach, mountain , toilet , fast food place , school  , church , monastery etc)     ?           and specifically  what are the strongest effect places in the world ? 

(anything someone wants to add about feng shui effects on practice are welcome)

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, waterdrop said:

 

17 minutes ago, waterdrop said:

can feng shui change a place so that 1 hour of qigong practice in it is worth 10   hours in another place ? 100 hours ? 10000 hours ?


 

Feng shui is to determine a suitable place to live based on your birthday. It determines which direction of the house should be facing by your birthday and where is your room should be in that house.

As far as to answer your question, that would be your wishful thinking. The best place to practice qigong is in the mountains where the fresh air is abundant. 

 
Edited by ReturnDragon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, waterdrop said:

how much effect does feng shui has on a persons practice ? 

I am talking about   the effect of the feng shui of the place where he "trains"  meditation/qigong   ? 

can feng shui change a place so that 1 hour of qigong practice in it is worth 10   hours in another place ? 100 hours ? 10000 hours ?

how to make a place have effect on the practice ?  

what are the "strongest"  effect feng shui places  -  in general  ( forest , river , beach, mountain , toilet , fast food place , school  , church , monastery etc)     ?           and specifically  what are the strongest effect places in the world ? 

(anything someone wants to add about feng shui effects on practice are welcome)

 

FYI, there are a few qigong styles that affect practice. 

 

Michael Winn's Primordial qigong requires you to begin east and use the powers of the specific Feng Shui. I believe @liminal_luke and @Jox both practice it. I did it for about a year before letting it go as I had other practices that called me more. 

 

Read up Benebell Wen's blog and send her questions about Feng Shui, as she is on indefinite leave here on the forum.

 

I have a couple practices that require directional focus, but this isn't relevant to the conjecture of the questions being made. 

 

The tree work Wang Liping does as well is mentioned briefly in early chapters of the Opening the Dragon Gate book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I know as much as facing south when doing qigong amd avoiding having clutter ib front of you.

Edited by Rara
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/9/2020 at 10:06 PM, ReturnDragon said:

Feng shui is to determine a suitable place to live based on your birthday. It determines which direction of the house should be facing by your birthday and where is your room should be in that house.

As far as to answer your question, that would be your wishful thinking. The best place to practice qigong is in the mountains where the fresh air is abundant.

 

There are too many problems in your claims to warrant case by case correction. However, the most important thing to remember about classic Chinese (and other) spiritual practices is that they are always holistic. You cannot make Feng Shui work through such simplistic reductions as birthday astrology.

 

It would be better if you quoted the original sources verbatim instead of making misleading abbreviations and guessing.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, ReturnDragon said:

If I do that, I don't think you can read it.

 

Translation of what ReturnDragon is saying: "I'm too lazy to post it, and I know better than others, but secretly I am afraid someone will find holes in my reasoning (everything I say is right because I'm Chinese and you're not) and sources (the first five hits of a Baidu/Google search)."

Edited by Earl Grey
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, ReturnDragon said:

If I do that, I don't think you can read it.

 

Thank you for your sincere consideration. Original sources are better than no sources at all because some of us can understand Chinese.

 

I will later post something good and informative on Feng Shui from a well-known Chinese master, in English.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, virtue said:

 

Thank you for your sincere consideration. Original sources are better than no sources at all because some of us can understand Chinese.

 

I will later post something good and informative on Feng Shui from a well-known Chinese master, in English.


With poor translation? I hope not!
 

Edited by ReturnDragon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, ReturnDragon said:


With poor translation? I hope not!
 

 

Unfortunately for you, everyone here does a better job than what you've been translating so far...everything from TTC to Zhan Zhuang to Confucius. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Is that why you used that against me? I am sorry you believed them all even though each says differently. Which one is really telling you the truth?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, ReturnDragon said:


Is that why you used that against me? I am sorry you believed them all even though each says differently. Which one is really telling you the truth?

 

You're making no sense...as usual.

 

Get specific, don't get vague.

 

And stick to the topic by actually providing the sources you cite for Feng Shui. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Earl Grey said:

 

You're making no sense...as usual.

 

Get specific, don't get vague.

 

And stick to the topic by actually providing the sources you cite for Feng Shui. 


I didn't expect you have an open mind to understand the original classic.

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, ReturnDragon said:


I didn't expect you have an open mind to understand the original classic.

 

Translation: "I know better, so listen to my interpretation instead." 

 

Keep digging yourself into a hole instead of showing your sources to scrutinize by people who actually know what they're talking about. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Earl Grey said:

And stick to the topic by actually providing the sources you cite for Feng Shui.


Please do and stop acting like a 5 year old kid.

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, ReturnDragon said:


Please do and stop acting like a 5 year old kid.

 

Five-year old kid (FraudDragon): 

 

Makes bold statements about his authority, does not cite sources when asked, assumes others won't understand Chinese. 

 

Adult and professional (everyone else):

 

Allows for discussion and can be challenged, cites references, gives others the benefit of being able to use their skills or friends to actually understand Chinese. 

 

I posted above Benebell Wen, Wang Liping, and other members who may have something to chime in. 

 

You however made a vague statement, and when challenged, refused to cite sources, then said others won't understand Chinese or that the sources are not going to have a good translation. Then when pressed to prove yourself, as usual, you result to ad hominem attacks, then you run away when you can no longer prove anything. 

 

You're a two year-old, FraudDragon. 

Edited by Earl Grey
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dr. Baolin Wu and co-author Jessica Eckstein have produced an excellent book named Lighting the Eye of the Dragon: Inner Secrets of Taoist Feng Shui. It's sold out, but you can still get used copies quite easily.

 

The book would be my first entry-level recommendation for anyone interested in the practical cross-section of Qigong and Feng Shui. It particularly emphasizes that in order to get proficient in Feng Shui you have to develop your own energetic sensitivity, so the book has many Qigong practices that develop that capacity.

 

Then onto other Qigong styles.

 

Classically it's said that practicing outdoors by gently flowing water is excellent when not too windy. Also, temples and holy sites are often selected for their favorable locations and are by their utility loaded with good energy that is particularly clarifying for the mind, but these locations might not always make good practice environments.

 

Mostly, optimizing the positive aspects are not so important for a practitioner; it's much more vital to avoid negative circumstances of practice. Almost any clean natural environment is good, but a smelly landfill is never desirable. If you are still trying to get a hold of the tranquility of your heart-mind, then it's good to avoid stimuli that provoke fearful or rejecting responses such as decrepit houses, prisons, hospitals and graveyards. When you are doing calmness meditation and many types of Qigong, it interacts with the environment in a manner that can introduce the flow of this qi into you, which can make you ill. Tantric and Buddhist meditations are different and these can even aspire to directly face darkness and our fears in the graveyards and haunted locations.

 

Shuigong teaches that sleeping direction matters for good sleep hygiene.

 

Fragrant Qigong is one style that has particularly strict set of conditions that the practitioner must avoid, including lunar and solar eclipses. Somehow this style is so deeply ingrained into the harmony of global and cosmic energy flows that many environmental perturbations can upset it.

 

William Bodri has also written an excellent article about the Feng Shui principles. I highly recommend reading it through: Should You Move Because of Your Feng Shui? Not Likely!

Edited by virtue
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Earl said it's better not to learn from books. Anyway the author is $15 richer.

If you believe it go for it.

Edited by ReturnDragon
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, ReturnDragon said:

Earl said it's better not to learn from books.

 

I suspect his admonishment relates to particular types of meditation that are dangerous to learn from books. For example, many of the Microcosmic Orbit and Lower Dantian practices are chiefly problematic and need wise instruction and adjustment which a book can't give.

 

There is nothing wrong in Dr. Baolin Wu's exercises in this book as far as I know.

 

Quote

Anyway the author is $15 richer.

 

The book is sold out already, so you have actually made another retail merchant richer. But anyway, I congratulate you for your wise choice! It's a really good book even if just bought for its Qigong practices.

Edited by virtue
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, ReturnDragon said:

With poor translation?

 

:lol:

 

'Good' translation is nothing without understanding born of real experience...

 

Or you could end up thinking that Zhan Zhuang means standing on poles...

 

🤣

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, ReturnDragon said:

Earl said it's better not to learn from books. Anyway the author is $15 richer.

If you believe it go for it.

 

Now you're misconstruing my words. 

 

We cited textual sources for Feng Shui. I do read books and learn from them. I didn't say a teacher replaces books, as teachers assign readings

 

You however, learned Taijiquan exclusively from books. That is what I criticized: learning from books and thinking a teacher is not necessary, then thinking you know more than actual teachers from a lineage. 

 

Way to look dumber every time you post. :rolleyes:

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, freeform said:

Good' translation is nothing without understanding born of real experience.

Good translation is resulted from good interpetation with understanding while standing on poles. :lol:

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, ReturnDragon said:

Good translation is resulted from good interpetation with understanding while standing on poles. :lol:


RidiculousDragon, I hate to say this, but the last master I showed your “Zhan Zhuang” to and your saber form said that you were so terrible that even David Carradine Tai Chi is better than yours. That’s how low you set the bar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/9/2020 at 11:49 AM, waterdrop said:

can feng shui change a place so that 1 hour of qigong practice in it is worth 10   hours in another place ? 100 hours ? 10000 hours ?

Yes, if you go to an oxygen bar.

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, freeform said:

 

:lol:

 

'Good' translation is nothing without understanding born of real experience...

 

Or you could end up thinking that Zhan Zhuang means standing on poles...

 

🤣

I like your sense of humor. My friend. 🙏

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites