Taomeow

Sumer: the "black-headed" vs. the "red-faced"

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14 hours ago, Taomeow said:

 

I'll start with these which I happen to have.  But you have to keep in mind that I'm primarily an empiricist, not a scholar, so when something like this gets into my hands, I'll just monkey see monkey do before I read all the explanations, and then 9 times out of 10 I never go back to check the manual and just keep experimenting.  Yup, guilty as charged... oops, I'm revealing the effect already.  

 

They can charge your meditation.  But what matters is, it's like batteries --  more like an electric outlet actually -- what you get depends on what you plug in.  If you plug in a functional TV,  you'll get to watch TV.  If you plug in an electric toothbrush, you can brush your teeth.  If you plug in a table lamp with no bulb you'll get nothing.  If you plug in a table lamp with no bulb and stick your finger to where the bulb ought to go to check what's up, you'll get zapped.  And if you plug a 110 volt geared American appliance into a 220 volt European outlet, you'll fry the appliance.  

 

I got two different sets from Svetlana  from 'Wands of Horus'  for free, in exchange for a paper  I wrote on  indigenous geo-magnetic field sensing  and orienteering  and its expression in artwork . .... and a Scoobie Doo cap I sent her daughter  (from a Scoobie Doo movie I worked on - apparently she loved it and used to wear it all the time, even in bed  :D )

 

 

 

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Am I making my metaphors clear so far? :) 

 

No, because I plugged my toothbrush into the wands and ...... nothing .   :( 

 

 

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As for the rest, let me first assuage your doubts.  I didn't mean Egyptians knew what the ankh was, or the fishing spear with grabber. 

 

The Egyptians DIDNT know the ank was  sandal strap ?

 

Okay then .

 

 

 

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I didn't mean they knew the actual object whose significance as a  symbol they may have inherited in a cargo cult of sorts -- they retained the notion of it being significant without having retained the connection to the actual object that's given birth to the symbol.

 

Thats what I want to know - the ORIGINAL  usages of the actual object .

 

 

 

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  Much like today no one really knows (except for people in the know) that the Starbucks' mermaid stands for...

 

She stands for integrity, good service and good coffee  ?

 

Wait ... I get it  now .

 

She cant 'stand'  for anything at all .   Sh'e got no feet .

 

 

 

 

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  well, my turn to ask trick questions for a change of pace.  Tell me whence the Starbucks' mermaid really derives and I can try asking my scaled and feathered informant about your other illustrations.  (I wouldn't call him my "friend" -- he's not friendly and we're not close...  rather, you have to win his answers by showing a measure of astuteness, and you can't really know in advance which of your educated guesses might impress him into throwing a tidbit as reward).        

 

 

 

Awwww ... you just answered a question with a question .

 

:rolleyes:

Edited by Nungali

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1 hour ago, Taomeow said:

 

 

What did Egyptians (via Egyptologists, of course) have to say about those neck twisters on the left? Sumerians had them too, and referred to them as lions (there's a story there as well).    

 

Giraffes ... from 'Punt'   ? 

 

 

rekhmire.jpg

 

giraffes.jpg

1 hour ago, Taomeow said:

 

 

Actually, I've made a pair of traditional huaraches for myself from scratch at one point and they were constructed not approximately but exactly like that.    The round part for the heel, the flip-flop strap between the big and second toe, and the things on the sides are tied over the top of the foot.  

 

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16 minutes ago, Nungali said:

 

The Egyptians DIDNT know the ank was  sandal strap ?

 

Okay then .

 

 

"Okay then."  Not what I said or meant.  What I said and meant was, it doesn't matter if they did or didn't.  It is interpreted (see Apech's contribution, e.g., though this is something that entered mainstream and new age and what not, unlike the sandal explanation) as "life" etc..  What my scaled and feathered informant asserted though is that it's not just any "life" it means but "civilized life" exclusively.   And whether Egyptians knew it en masse or not, I don't know.  But, like I said, it doesn't matter, because this interpretation ascribes the significance of the symbol to something bigger than the knowledge (or superstition, whatever the case may be) possessed by Egyptians.

 

The second thing, the fishing spear/grabber, is also something I don't know whether they remembered hundreds of thousands of years of using like that or, again, adopted and reinterpreted much later as a symbol of certain "power" or redesigned to do something else and reinterpreted the meaning of or the function of or both.  But that, again, doesn't matter.  In this case, it is a symbol whose interpretation of "power" comes from the actual power once wielded by those who used it as described.  Humans who used tools without yet taking the perilous step of becoming tools.        

Edited by Taomeow

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14 hours ago, Taomeow said:

Tell me whence the Starbucks' mermaid really derives and I can try asking my scaled and feathered informant about your other illustrations.  (I wouldn't call him my "friend" -- he's not friendly and we're not close...  rather, you have to win his answers by showing a measure of astuteness, and you can't really know in advance which of your educated guesses might impress him into throwing a tidbit as reward).        

 

 

Ishtar?

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2 hours ago, Taomeow said:

 

 

What did Egyptians (via Egyptologists, of course) have to say about those neck twisters on the left? Sumerians had them too, and referred to them as lions (there's a story there as well).    

 

 

Actually, I've made a pair of traditional huaraches for myself from scratch at one point and they were constructed not approximately but exactly like that.    The round part for the heel, the flip-flop strap between the big and second toe, and the things on the sides are tied over the top of the foot.  

 

 

Not much because they are as you point out not very Egyptian and possibly Sumerian - the circular space between the necks is where the malachite was ground and mixed to make eye make up.  Green was the colour of health, wholeness and soundness - so green eye make-up was good.

 

I had to look up 'huaraches' - I'd never heard of them :)

 

There's another fringe theory about the ankh - that is a cross section of a bovine vertebrae.

 

il_fullxfull.1277581916_qsgt.jpg

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30 minutes ago, liminal_luke said:

 

Ishtar?

 

I once went into Starbucks and asked for a tall, white Americano - and Robert Mitchum walked out from behind the counter.  Would you believe it?

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24 minutes ago, liminal_luke said:

 

Ishtar?

 

Possibly -- they may be related -- but primarily Melusine, the progenitor water dragon/woman/monster/serpent/fairy/mermaid/queen o'two tails many European royal families still trace their official genealogy to as the progenitor of the royal blood lineages -- the Plantagenet families, Angevin, the House of Anjou and Vere and the Merovingians, in particular.

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6 hours ago, Apech said:

 

 

Not much because they are as you point out not very Egyptian and possibly Sumerian - the circular space between the necks is where the malachite was ground and mixed to make eye make up.  Green was the colour of health, wholeness and soundness - so green eye make-up was good.

 

I had to look up 'huaraches' - I'd never heard of them :)

 

There's another fringe theory about the ankh - that is a cross section of a bovine vertebrae.

 

il_fullxfull.1277581916_qsgt.jpg

 

 

 

Here is another theory   ;

 

African fertility doll, ' Aken' .

 

 

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Being a fertility symbol it goes will with the 'life' interpretation  (and maybe even 'power' - for a ' matriarchal era '  society ) .

 

 

 

 

 

 

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PS.  malachite is toxic  especially when ground up .  The eye lids are very sensitive .  All one has to do is gently wipe the eye lid with a finger after chopping chilli - even after a good had wash .

 

I cant imagine what the long term usage  effects would be though        :unsure:

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1 hour ago, Nungali said:

PS.  malachite is toxic  especially when ground up .  The eye lids are very sensitive .  All one has to do is gently wipe the eye lid with a finger after chopping chilli - even after a good had wash .

 

I cant imagine what the long term usage  effects would be though        :unsure:

 

I thought they were using lapis lasuli.  It's supposed to improve one's eyesight.

 

As for fertility symbol...  also possible, I have seldom come across a symbol that stands for just one thing without hiding another which may be hiding another -- many are Russian dolls.  That's why I asked you about the Starbucks' logo.  You could have said "It stands for Starbucks coffee," and wouldn't be wrong.  

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4 hours ago, Nungali said:

PS.  malachite is toxic  especially when ground up .  The eye lids are very sensitive .  All one has to do is gently wipe the eye lid with a finger after chopping chilli - even after a good had wash .

 

I cant imagine what the long term usage  effects would be though        :unsure:

 

 

Indeed and it gets worse they used galena as well:

 

 

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Galena eye paint (later termed Kohl in Arabic from the Akkadian word for the cosmetic) was widely applied in Ancient Egypt. Upper eyelids were painted black and lower ones were colored green, as depicted in ancient texts that describe the use of both black galena and green malachite. Ancient graves from the pre-historic Tasian culture point to the early application of galena in Egypt, a custom stretching from the Badarian period through to the Coptic era. Although found locally, both black galena and green malachite were also imported from nearby regions in Western Asia, Coptos and the Land of Punt.[5]

 

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On 11/30/2019 at 8:35 AM, ilumairen said:

 

This certainly seems the intent of the story.. scare young men, and damn the women willing to embrace them. A cautionary literary device to be sure. :lol:

 

Edit to add: Why is the "fall of man" (singular or otherwise) so often attributed to women?

 

Origin story of christianity,

similar to sumerian myth

Spoken about in Japanese folklore, specifically Takeminakata and in some stories relating to amaterasu

the list goes on

 

Not to mention that story seems to flip between man and woman depending on time period and who wrote it.

 

From the many stories it really doesn't seem like these ideas were created through natural evolution. There always seems to be a deity or an advanced group of people, involved with the creating of these stories.  So it's difficult to say whether any of the perspectives, ideas, or opinions are natural occuring ones, or ficticious stories to keep our minds enslaved.

 

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13 hours ago, Taomeow said:

 

I thought they were using lapis lasuli.  It's supposed to improve one's eyesight.

 

As for fertility symbol...  also possible, I have seldom come across a symbol that stands for just one thing without hiding another which may be hiding another -- many are Russian dolls.  That's why I asked you about the Starbucks' logo.  You could have said "It stands for Starbucks coffee," and wouldn't be wrong.  

 

I still maintain a mermaid cannot stand for anything . 

 

 

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52 minutes ago, Nungali said:

 

I still maintain a mermaid cannot stand for anything . 

 

 

 

Only if she has just one tail.  This one has two.  Melusine could stand just fine, but once a week she had to take a bath and stretch out her tails.  At some point she was spied on, and that's how they found out.

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11 minutes ago, Nungali said:

Mmmmokay .

 

I just remembered that dolphins can do it too 

 

 

 

  Reveal hidden contents

DXkf4G.gif

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is difficult to be an escort of so many, don't you think? 

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1 minute ago, Everything said:

It is difficult to be an escort of so many, don't you think? 

 

 

I think you need to piss off out of this thread .

 

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I was going to bring this up before, now seems like a good time .

 

Regarding early  human societies habitations , a while back I looked into the Arctic . I was conversing with an Indian chap about the book 'Arctic Home of the Vedas'. I was surprised to see that people lived so far north, so long ago .

 

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21328464-900-siberia-was-a-wildlife-refuge-in-the-last-ice-age/

 

https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn28774-humans-adapted-to-arctic-life-10000-years-earlier-than-thought/

 

https://www.discovermagazine.com/planet-earth/these-ice-age-humans-somehow-survived-north-of-the-arctic-circle

 

Most of these ^ go back to the Ice Age but before that, during the  Eemian Interglacial  some human groups spread into areas WAY before the ice age , but it is said that these lines of people died out ; Morocco ,  Arabia, and near the Arctic Circle in Siberia .

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To the castle!  To the point!

 

Napta, the Sumerians called petroleum.  Versions of this word still mean "petroleum" in many European and Asian languages.  It is the second most abundant liquid on Earth.  Petroleum has been used since at least 6000 years ago -- though until the 19th century, seldom as fuel.  That's one thing we can't blame the early civilizations for.  It was explored and employed when needed -- but it was too stinky and messy to burn for energy (with a noteworthy exception of 2000 years ago when the Chinese used oil and natural gas for heat and light.  They used bamboo pipes for carrying gas into homes.) 

 

In Mesopotamia, bitumen and asphalt were used as caulking for ships, a setting for jewelry and mosaics, and an adhesive for weapon handles.  Egyptians used it for embalming.  There's references to bitumen being used for Moses' basket and Noah's Ark. 

 

Native Americans used asphaltum much the same way -- to waterpoof stuff and make it airtight.  They also used it medicinally, and the Seneca who traded it also employed it in body paint and for ceremonial fires.  European settlers, until the late 19th century, used to be bitterly disappointed if they dug a well to find water and struck oil instead.  But then someone who probably had an olfactory disability invented the kerosene lamp.  The year was 1854.  And that's when the modernmost history commences in earnest.   

Edited by Taomeow
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On 11/30/2019 at 4:29 AM, Taomeow said:

A prayer:

 

May all topic derailers and thread hijackers taste their own medicine in real life.  May they be sidetracked by whoever they talk to into discussing anything but what they want to talk about.  May their explicit pleas to stick to the subject be always ignored.  May they always be dragged kicking and screaming into someone else's agenda.  May they stand no chance to follow through on any interest of theirs due to someone else just lying in wait to pounce on that and pound it into the ground as soon as they express it.  May everyone around them be always on the lookout to prevent any chance of their learning, comprehending, sharing, mulling over, or otherwise addressing any subject of their choice.  May they be dumped all manner of garbage upon as soon as they appear anywhere, may they become walking talking garbage dumpsters.  May they sag under the load and crawl aimlessly in a stupor of indifference and apathy.  What's the point of anything if there's no way for them to ever stick to the point?..     

 

Amen.  

 

Amen. 

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48 minutes ago, Nungali said:

 

Regarding early  human societies habitations , a while back I looked into the Arctic

 

We'll get there in due time I hope.  I've been listening to a paleontologist/biologist (just yesterday, after a couple of exceedingly bright people I know kept bringing up his name) who took a bit over an hour to explain climate on Earth in a way that made my heart sing -- as fractals, large cogwheels (turning with the periodicity of tens of millions of years) and then smaller ones (millions) and smaller (hundreds of thousands) and then smaller still ( tens of thousands) and smaller (thousands) and smaller (within a thousand) and smaller...  all the way down to that one spike on the tiny cog we're presently riding...  but don't let me go there yet (or ever), the reason I brought it up is, I now understand how climate on planet Earth really works -- perhaps for the fist time -- so "far North and "far South" don't really mean what we expect them to mean when the bigger cogs turn...  I don't know if there's an English version for this dude, will try to find it.  (A blitz search yielded only a short bio:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirill_Eskov )

Edited by Taomeow
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I heard a very ancient   Aboriginal woman describe , with great difficulty due to English being used , a similar weather process.  Eventually I got her .  'Like orbital gears  ? '  but she didnt know what that was.  Like the Mayan calendar ? Nope, she didnt know that either. So I drew  a simple pic of orbital gears in the dirt with a stick , I put some marks on some of the wheels ' Sometimes, these all line up together ? '

 

She got that, "Yes  sometimes , REALLY big drought or rain , lot of heat or cold ."  Then she added " I only know about  6 of these  inside each other , old people taught me , they got heaps more , all inside each other , turning .  Now, we lost a lot of that . "

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