morning dew

Dr Jwing-Ming Yang

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I'm about halfway through Dr Yang's The Root of Chinese Qigong. I'm really enjoying it and finding it really helpful: it's answered a lot of questions I have and it's really tying together everything.

 

What do you all think about this book or him in general? Also, has anyone read any of his other books in his series that have made a big impact on you?

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I have been reading his book Embryonic Breathing for 8 months. It last because it's boring in the way it's written, many many repetitions... boring but interesting, the guy is a scholar with a large background practice and seems to be very serious in his study. Honest also, he says he doesn't masterize all what he promotes.

I enjoy to find traduction of old alchemical books. I'll keep reading.

 

 

 

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Thanks. :) Very interesting to read your comments and those threads.

 

Yeah, 'boring and interesting' is a good way of putting it, IMO. I know what you mean about the repetition. A couple of times I thought I'd lost my place and gone backwards in the book when I started reading familiar material again. :D 

 

To be honest, I actually quite like his style. I've not come across any miraculous BS stories or fluff; it's all quite analytic and academic. I actually find it quite helpful that he repeats, because I'm still quite a bumbling newbie when it comes to books like this. 

 

Also, I quite like his honesty as well, especially when he's speculating and admits it, and doesn't pretend to hold the mysteries to the universe.

 

I think I'll keep reading as well. :) 

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You 'liked' my post here about his books:

 

Maybe go with more specific questions.

 

Here is my experience with him, which I have likely shared but I'll do so again.

 

The books I recommended should be understood in order:

 

I started with self-teaching and self-reading of Dr. YJM...   it can be done as a starting point but the fact is, doing Qigong without supervision can be dangerous.   I tested several of his claims and found them to be true results when followed carefully.

 

A must first read:

Chi Kung: Health and Martial Arts

 

Close second read:

The Essence of Tai Chi Chi Kung

 

Others I recommend:

 

Chinese Qigong Massage: General Massage

 

Root of Chinese Chi Kung the Secrets Of (Ymaa Chi Kung Series, #1)

 

Qigong Meditation: Embryonic Breathing

 

I was able to re-produce everything he shared in those two... down to each form and MCO.  In the second book, Tai Chi Chi Kung, see page 80-82, Arching the Arms or Embracing the Moon on the Chest.   This must be tested fully.  If you can re-produce what he says should occur, then you are truly ready to keep going on in energy practices. 

 

Qigong massage should be read by anyone who is doing massage... It covers the 12 meridians in a way everyone in energy arts should understand.  The various points, gates, and direction to employ is great. The reflexology at the end is very good.

 

If you really get through the first three, then Root of Chinese Chi Kung seems redundant...  that is his problem as he tends to recycle his material too much.   Root is a good first book to see his overall theory but the first three books in my list are better detail.  This book adds a bit of qigong history and theory.

 

Embryonic Breathing is in some ways a very disappointing book due to the lack of clear guidance on how to actually do the practice.  The greatest gift of the book is page 153 onward of translations of ancient texts. 

 

This is my final opinion: 

I think his early materials are golden but he later resorts to recycling his material but adds something new in most cases.  He comes from a martial art point of view and has hundreds of publications on that too... so I don't feel he fully grasps the Qigong, energy art side given someone who has published for so many decades.  He is best to feed the martial art group, IMO.

 

My Medical Qigong teacher went to meet him and while JMY claims to teach 'push hands' as his highest art, he refused to do it with my Medical Qigong teacher...  and he was very smart to refuse.   My Medical Qigong teacher only uses one hand to do push hands and he uses the other hand to manipulate his opponents Qi to seek out their weakness.  He did this in Asian in competitions for many years.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thanks for taking the time to write this. Very interesting (as usual). :) 

 

Yeah, I should have been a little bit clearer as to what I was looking for. Right now it was just to get an overview of Qigong and see what was on offer. I wasn't looking to specifically learn any practices from his books. I was just wondering if he knew what he was talking about. 

 

I'll probably be looking at Medical Qigong to start with – I've been doing eight pieces of brocade for ages now, but might consider looking at other stuff now I'm beginning to understand the 'lay of the land'.

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JMO... the eight pieces are in his first two books... I'd use those first two books to see you can confirm what he is teaching.

 

Making a jump to Medical Qigong is of significant depth.   I just mean, make sure you feel you have the foundation or the destiny.

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Dr Yang Jwing Ming is a treasure for all martial artist. He was  a personal friend of one of my teachers and part of the founders that Master Jou Tsung Hwa started  Chang Sen Feng Day. I have a great amount respect for Dr Yang.  

 

Master Jou,s book Tao of Tai Chi Chuan I would also recommend.

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15 hours ago, dawei said:

JMO... the eight pieces are in his first two books... I'd use those first two books to see you can confirm what he is teaching.

 

Making a jump to Medical Qigong is of significant depth.   I just mean, make sure you feel you have the foundation or the destiny.

 

Yeah, sounds like good advice to me. :) I found some of his brocade videos on yt and I'll see if I can get hold of those two books on the cheap.

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15 hours ago, Wu Ming Jen said:

Dr Yang Jwing Ming is a treasure for all martial artist. He was  a personal friend of one of my teachers and part of the founders that Master Jou Tsung Hwa started  Chang Sen Feng Day. I have a great amount respect for Dr Yang.  

 

Master Jou,s book Tao of Tai Chi Chuan I would also recommend.

 

Sounds interesting. I'll keep an eye out for that one as well. :) 

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On 18/08/2017 at 10:42 PM, morning dew said:

I was just wondering if he knew what he was talking about. 

 

I think so.

 

He has a good knowledge of both oriental and occidental medicine and can make good sense of qigong in relation to both.

 

I'm biased. I'm a big fan and have many of his materials to compliment my teachers teachings.

 

Dr seems honest and knowledgable.

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On 8/17/2017 at 11:13 AM, morning dew said:

I'm about halfway through Dr Yang's The Root of Chinese Qigong. I'm really enjoying it and finding it really helpful: it's answered a lot of questions I have and it's really tying together everything.

 

What do you all think about this book or him in general? Also, has anyone read any of his other books in his series that have made a big impact on you?

 

On 8/18/2017 at 3:01 PM, Wu Ming Jen said:

Dr Yang Jwing Ming is a treasure for all martial artist. He was  a personal friend of one of my teachers and part of the founders that Master Jou Tsung Hwa started  Chang Sen Feng Day. I have a great amount respect for Dr Yang.  

 

Master Jou,s book Tao of Tai Chi Chuan I would also recommend.

 

2 hours ago, Ad_B said:

 

I think so.

 

He has a good knowledge of both oriental and occidental medicine and can make good sense of qigong in relation to both.

 

I'm biased. I'm a big fan and have many of his materials to compliment my teachers teachings.

 

Dr seems honest and knowledgable.

I echo the sentiments of Wu Ming Jen and Ad_B.

 

Dr Yang Jwing-Ming's writings have been quite valuable to me personally.   Both of my wudang teachers speak almost no english, so without a translator always present much of my training is attention/observation based and then what small chinese I have picked up.  Dr Yang is appreciated as when I read his books, I encounter his english descriptions of processes that I have experienced, but rarely talked about.

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2 minutes ago, silent thunder said:

 

 

I echo the sentiments of Wu Ming Jen and Ad_B.

 

Dr Yang Jwing-Ming's writings have been quite valuable to me personally.   Both of my wudang teachers speak almost no english, so without a translator always present much of my training is attention/observation based and then what small chinese I have picked up.  Dr Yang is appreciated as when I read his books, I encounter his english descriptions of processes that I have experienced, but rarely talked about.

 

Ah, very interesting. That must be quite difficult training with somebody who doesn't speak much English. What kind of stuff do you do with wudang? I'm not familiar with this (or not under this name); I can't remember what practices you do.

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19 hours ago, morning dew said:

 

Ah, very interesting. That must be quite difficult training with somebody who doesn't speak much English. What kind of stuff do you do with wudang? I'm not familiar with this (or not under this name); I can't remember what practices you do.

I play two Qi Gong forms that I learned from Master Zhou Ting-Jue and stillness/emptiness as taught by Master Wang Liping.  Both are 18th generation of their respective Wudang/Longmen lineages. 

 

It's been tough for my monkey mind, as he really loves to chew bones and spend many hours contemplating and thinking then rethinking and overthinking things.  But as I tend to dwell in my mind too readily by default for long periods, this is perhaps the better for my predisposition to over intellectualize processes that are only impeded by such tensions and added layers.

 

Without all the language and mental projections to play with, the bored monkey quiets down and I am allowed space to embody the breath and movements. 

 

I find now, years into these practices that the less my mind is active/present, the less tension is present to impede flow.

 

 

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On 02/09/2017 at 12:16 PM, silent thunder said:

I play two Qi Gong forms that I learned from Master Zhou Ting-Jue and stillness/emptiness as taught by Master Wang Liping.  Both are 18th generation of their respective Wudang/Longmen lineages. 

 

It's been tough for my monkey mind, as he really loves to chew bones and spend many hours contemplating and thinking then rethinking and overthinking things.  But as I tend to dwell in my mind too readily by default for long periods, this is perhaps the better for my predisposition to over intellectualize processes that are only impeded by such tensions and added layers.

 

Without all the language and mental projections to play with, the bored monkey quiets down and I am allowed space to embody the breath and movements. 

 

I find now, years into these practices that the less my mind is active/present, the less tension is present to impede flow.

 

 

Hi. The forms from master Zhou are like tai chi? Flowing forms only ordoes

he teaches statics postures?

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1 hour ago, moreira Filho said:

Hi. The forms from master Zhou are like tai chi? Flowing forms only ordoes

he teaches statics postures?

Hey there.

I learned two forms of Qi Gong from Master Zhou.  They are not Tai Chi-esque, aside from that they are moving forms. 

 

They are the first two of the four forms in the Qi Gong system he offers the public.  They are described on his website

 

I imagine levels 3 or 4 will incorporate stillness, but this is pure conjecture and speculation on my part.

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On 07/05/2020 at 6:37 PM, silent thunder said:

Hey there.

I learned two forms of Qi Gong from Master Zhou.  They are not Tai Chi-esque, aside from that they are moving forms. 

 

They are the first two of the four forms in the Qi Gong system he offers the public.  They are described on his website

 

I imagine levels 3 or 4 will incorporate stillness, but this is pure conjecture and speculation on my part.

Thank you for the info. 

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