morning dew

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About morning dew

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  1. Yeah, I wonder what the difficulty is here. I've been having a look at VM's homepage and he certainly seems qualified enough to be doing a serious translation – although, to be fair, the book was written back in 1998, and also he doesn't seem to be the only one struggling with translating the ZZ in places. https://www.sas.upenn.edu/ealc/mair This is an interesting review on Amazon about VM's book: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Wandering-Way-Taoist-Parables-Chuang/dp/082482038X/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&qid=1495378805&sr=8-13&keywords=victor+mair#
  2. Mair seems to struggle when translating names, although, to be fair, at least he gives it a go. Now this makes a bit more sense to me. The two translations we have on here have: How does one have the Way of a sage or the Dao without the abilities of a sage? This doesn't seem very logical to me.
  3. http://www.hermetics.com/practice/#step1
  4. I'm still pondering on this. I found this translation a bit less incomprehensible, although Woman Hunchback appears to have turned into a Sir in this one, for some reason: http://ctext.org/dictionary.pl?if=en&id=2755
  5. Yeah, I've known people who've taken bits and pieces from it and found it useful. The stumbling block for me with his book was the cold showers and brushing. I got the feeling a huge chunk of his system would revolve around open pore breathing, so I gave up on it. The biggest takeaway I had from it was imprinting liquid, such as glasses of water that I drink throughout the day. I used to imprint them with the ankh symbol, although I've switched to the Uruz rune now. I must have a dig around in his book, and see if I can pinch some other techniques of use.
  6. I must have a look at this also when I sit down to read this thread. I remember reading bits and pieces of it in the past, and there's loads of fascinating information in here, IMO. That's fascinating. I've only read the first couple of steps of his and had no idea he talked about such things later on.
  7. Woah, I'm getting nervous just reading some of these replies. I grew up in London, so it would have been unthinkable not to have locked the front door and I still feel the same way. I was in an area last year (out of London) for a while where the main door to the block of flats didn't lock, and even that made me quite uncomfortable (although it was a fairly quiet and safe area).
  8. Well, I guess we'll have to agree to disagree on that. I see many examples of wu wei (as I understand it) throughout life; efficiency is how I approach everything, personally – if it didn't have a practical use, it would be useless to me. How do others on here understand wu wei or apply it in their lives?
  9. Well, ZZ's Cook Ding being an expert butcher is quite a random example just as the cyclist is. If it can be applied to chopping oxen, I would imagine wu wei can be applied to anything. Am I sure this is an exact meaning of this term, though? Nope. Sounds like a person after my own heart.
  10. Ouch Road rash? I'm guessing that's more painful than a broken bone.
  11. Yeah, basically what the others said. I'm not an expert, but I tend to see wu wei as efficiency: getting the job done as quickly as possible with the least expenditure of energy, i.e. speed and conservation by working with the environment rather than against it.
  12. Yikes! What happened? I hope nothing too serious.
  13. Thanks to everybody who sorted out the new layout. It looks great, especially on a tablet. I'm slowly getting used to all the options, and I find this new setup quite nice and flexible.
  14. A friend of mine shared this to me on Facebook, and it seemed to me it was quite a nice visual representation of wu wei. Anyone got any others they'd like to share?
  15. Yeah, this is another classic video of that mindset.