morning dew

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  1. Them thats doing

    It's nice to see him still going. I always thought he looked a very jolly fellow in his videos. I've also enjoyed what I've read of his books.
  2. Thanks. I couldn't find Alex's details. The most I could find was this: https://wulinmingshi.wordpress.com/2017/02/18/gordon-tso-and-song-style-xingyiquan/ It's okay, though. He's probably way too advanced for me right now.
  3. Thanks to everyone for the input in this thread. It was really useful to help me make a decision. Damo seems to be based in North London. However, looking at their "training with us" section, I don't think it would be appropriate for me as I have a lot of muscular problems and a knee problem at the moment: http://lotusneigong.com/qi-gong-nei-gong/ I did tai chi and brocades last year, but my main interest is health at the moment. I think I'm going to go back to basics with this school and not get ahead of myself. I don't really know anything about them, but they seem huge and there will be several different classes nearby me: http://www.taichinews.com/classes/qigong
  4. Thanks for the input. Yeah, looking at his biography, you may well be right that he's overdone it in the range of things he's studied, given his age, to call himself a master (if that's what he does call himself). I don't know enough about him, really. I was curious, because I'm moving up to London very soon and was wondering if his school was worth checking out. I'm guessing the answer would be 'No' from you.
  5. I was just looking at Damo's video and I noticed things like Heavenly Bow, which appears in the Brocades. He describes this as a fundamental exercise for maintaining health. I was curious if anyone knew how similar these two forms of medical Qi Gong are in terms of what they achieve?
  6. The no-enlightenment thread

    I'm not sure I'm that much the wiser having read this, but here it is anyway: https://io9.gizmodo.com/the-gruesome-and-excruciating-practice-of-mummifying-yo-1515905564
  7. How do you protect your qi?

    ETA = edited to add I'm not hugely into Zen either. To me, it kind of reminds me of this thread in the sense that it's okay to experience life and not repress sensory input (i.e. it's okay to touch women, etc.), but on the other hand don't obsess about it either. It seems in line with Seattle's comment that I quoted: It's not a perfect match, though. I'm sure there are better Zen stories I could have found.
  8. How do you protect your qi?

    Well, I'm just a bumbling amateur, so I don't really have anything particularly deep to add to this thread (other than to agree with this and Kar3n). I would say, however, there doesn't seem much point in living if you're not going to experience life. ETA: actually, this thread kind of reminded me of this Zen story: http://www.kindspring.org/story/view.php?sid=63753
  9. What is Buddhism/the Buddha incorrect about?

    Thanks, Steve. That's fascinating.
  10. Thanks for the input. I think it's interesting, but I ended up taking on too much and I've dropped it now. I've basically stuck with the eight pieces. Have you been doing his version for long? Did you find any decent benefits from it?
  11. What is Buddhism/the Buddha incorrect about?

    Well, I'm just a bumbling amateur in these topics, but it seems to me the goal of creating the immortal fetus (or whatever it's called) through internal alchemy in some Taoist practices is probably in opposition to some Buddhist practices/systems that seek to dissolve into Nirvana on death? I don't know. Anyone have any idea?
  12. Can you remember any of the names of these Western systems?