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TaoMeow on Coffee

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thanks for the help taomeow, i used your method today. there was no foam, that's true, but i think the taste suffered because the lack of foam, is this possible? maybe i've gotten used to a more substantial "mouth feel" via the presence of it before and now don't know what's going on that it's gone, or i just screwed up somehow along the way.

 

i kind of feel that maybe even medium is too high a flame on my stove and it perhaps heated too quickly and didn't really allow the ibrik to do it's magic, i got my ethiopian beans (roasted just last Wednesday) far too late in the day to use them as i work second shift... will report again tomorrow (with pictures!)

 

Well, let me take a guess -- and it may be my bad that you screwed up your cup because I emphasized leaving enough room in the ibrik for the foam to rise but didn't mention the second part of the how-to:

 

the water must come all the way to the narrow part of the ibrik, so you shouldn't be using too little of it either, not just too much,

and

if this doesn't do the job it means you are using too little coffee.

 

If all the prerequisites are met, you do get foam, just not "too much." The vehicle shaped this way facilitates a kind of brewing that is akin to baking or pressure-cooking -- the narrow part allows the rising foam and grounds to form a cork and briefly seal it. So the liquid underneath is exposed to continuous sub-boiling heat under pressure, without actually being able to come to a boil, until the very last moment when the cork can't hold up to the pressure anymore and there's a volcanic event happening. Some of the ibriks used by various peoples in the East are actually clay or ceramic to slow down this steeping-decocting brewing method even further; while some use sand heaters (those are the best, I've had coffee made like that in Yerevan, many moons ago) and bury the ibrik in the sand so the heat is steady and even all around but not excessive. But the first rule is to make sure the concentration and amount of the liquid match the shape that is meant to generate this process.

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Tao_meow, you know what? :) I have never stumbled upon any authentic taoist (I mean not doubtful qigong masters who call upon bigu and so on) who said anything against grains. I personally would be careful with such theories. I read orientalist E. Torchinov essay on this (he was very good orientalist) and that was mentioned in that essay that there was notion of "abstaining of five grains", which meant some mundane human qualities which taoists should abandon and that there was a notion of "grain immortal" meaning Gui Xian (ghost immortal) which meant attainment of "false immortality".

You need better sources to stumble upon. :) E.g.:

 

https://sites.google.com/site/delawareteasociety/yoked-to-earth-a-treatise-on-corpse-demons-and-bigu

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That's really interesting, what are the effects/benefits of being in ketosis?

Well, in a nutshell, it's the advantages of normal human functioning over functioning in a continuous metabolic stress. I.e. absolutely everything is affected. That's because fuel from glucose is a back-up system -- the body stores glycogen for emergencies, fight of flight type, it's available immediately and burns fast, like rocket fuel of metabolism. Fuel from ketones is the primary system -- the body stores fat for steady and slow burning, for "mileage" rather than fight-or-flight. With constant consumption of carbs, the main problem, metabolically speaking, is constant (daily and lifelong) spikes of insulin, which is the body's standard response to sugars (converted to glucose) in the bloodstream. This, however, is the abuse of the insulin system whose real primary function, in the absence of this constant jerking, is cellular repair and regeneration. It is a most ancient molecule present in most all life forms on earth, including those that don't eat any sugars at all. To divert it from this function toward processing a continuous influx of sugar tells the body, effectively, that "it's not the right time for repairs, renovations, restoration and regeneration, it's an emergency, hunting is bad, we're either starving, which is why there's no fat getting into the body for energy, or we're being hunted ourselves and there's a splurge of glucose into the system so we can run away." The insulin system does not differentiate between a splurge of glucose from stored glycogen or from an eaten bagel, it will react identically in this respect to "rabbit starvation" (an Innuit term for when nothing but vegetable sources of food are available) or being chased by a tiger (glycogen is there for such emergencies). But functioning metabolically as though it's an emergency, high stress, red alert at all times for all purposes?.. That's taking its tall on absolutely all systems and functions, and may be (together with gluten, a separate devil) the main factor behind a continuous degradation of the human DNA (and this degradation is a sad phenomenon well established in genetic anthropology.)

 

Ketosis is not a dietary fad, it's the primary normal mode of human functioning. Business as usual, something most humans have been deprived of for thousands of years. A high-fat, moderate-protein, super-low-carb to no carb diet signals, "the hunting is good, no immediate dangers present, time to take care of routine maintenance on the cellular level" -- and insulin the repairman takes over many of these tasks when he is not called to an emergency instead, he can fix your toilet (e.g.) instead of hauling its pieces away from the site of an explosion.

 

The book I mentioned earlier, "Primal Body, Primal Mind" by Nora Gedgaudas is a worthwhile read even if you are not going to try this nutritional mode, it's just good and superbly researched and useful, IMO.

 

The reason I quit paleo (maybe temporarily, haven't decided yet) is that I actually don't need to lose any weight but I couldn't stop losing it on this regimen. The remedy would be perhaps to eat more, but that would require better planning and organization, it's a metabolic revolution that warrants a revolution in your shopping and food storage habits, takes quite a bit of ingenuity, and (the bummer in my personal case) remembering what you need to have because you can't use the usual "filler material" for food anymore. So, between melting away and skipping meals because I didn't think ahead (and I hate skipping meals, I love to eat!), I decided I needed a break. Modern lifestyles are not paleo friendly, to say the least... I might give this another try down the road though.

Edited by Taomeow
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In my experience, myths and miracles are just products of mind. Nothing of this is left standing if you go through any deep transformation, gross or subtle. The biggest fruits of my practice is really enjoying a cup of coffee.

 

Personally, what I see as the essence of my life as a Daoist is passing on a flame.

Nothing else matters, or will fall away.

 

h

I thought this was poignant and on subject. What kind of coffee & what kind of fruit Hagar ?

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Well, in a nutshell, it's the advantages of normal human functioning over functioning in a continuous metabolic stress. I.e. absolutely everything is affected. That's because fuel from glucose is a back-up system -- the body stores glycogen for emergencies, fight of flight type, it's available immediately and burns fast, like rocket fuel of metabolism. Fuel from ketones is the primary system -- the body stores fat for steady and slow burning, for "mileage" rather than fight-or-flight. With constant consumption of carbs, the main problem, metabolically speaking, is constant (daily and lifelong) spikes of insulin, which is the body's standard response to sugars (converted to glucose) in the bloodstream. This, however, is the abuse of the insulin system whose real primary function, in the absence of this constant jerking, is cellular repair and regeneration. It is a most ancient molecule present in most all life forms on earth, including those that don't eat any sugars at all. To divert it from this function toward processing a continuous influx of sugar tells the body, effectively, that "it's not the right time for repairs, renovations, restoration and regeneration, it's an emergency, hunting is bad, we're either starving, which is why there's no fat getting into the body for energy, or we're being hunted ourselves and there's a splurge of glucose into the system so we can run away." The insulin system does not differentiate between a splurge of glucose from stored glycogen or from an eaten bagel, it will react identically in this respect to "rabbit starvation" (an Innuit term for when nothing but vegetable sources of food are available) or being chased by a tiger (glycogen is there for such emergencies). But functioning metabolically as though it's an emergency, high stress, red alert at all times for all purposes?.. That's taking its tall on absolutely all systems and functions, and may be (together with gluten, a separate devil) the main factor behind a continuous degradation of the human DNA (and this degradation is a sad phenomenon well established in genetic anthropology.)

 

Ketosis is not a dietary fad, it's the primary normal mode of human functioning. Business as usual, something most humans have been deprived of for thousands of years. A high-fat, moderate-protein, super-low-carb to no carb diet signals, "the hunting is good, no immediate dangers present, time to take care of routine maintenance on the cellular level" -- and insulin the repairman takes over many of these tasks when he is not called to an emergency instead, he can fix your toilet (e.g.) instead of hauling its pieces away from the site of an explosion.

 

The book I mentioned earlier, "Primal Body, Primal Mind" by Nora Gedgaudas is a worthwhile read even if you are not going to try this nutritional mode, it's just good and superbly researched and useful, IMO.

 

The reason I quit paleo (maybe temporarily, haven't decided yet) is that I actually don't need to lose any weight but I couldn't stop losing it on this regimen. The remedy would be perhaps to eat more, but that would require better planning and organization, it's a metabolic revolution that warrants a revolution in your shopping and food storage habits, takes quite a bit of ingenuity, and (the bummer in my personal case) remembering what you need to have because you can't use the usual "filler material" for food anymore. So, between melting away and skipping meals because I didn't think ahead (and I hate skipping meals, I love to eat!), I decided I needed a break. Modern lifestyles are not paleo friendly, to say the least... I might give this another try down the road though.

 

Appreciate the informative reply! I will check out the book you mentioned.

Unfortunately as you mentioned it's hard to switch to & weight loss thing would perhaps be expected but still, something to keep in mind if future states allow it...

 

I was watching a documentary on a community which basically gets most of their food from walrus, fish and whale. So its a high fat hunter gatherer style living. Their blood work was impeccable and the only guy who was less healthy than the others had a habit of eating processed sausages at home :D.

 

Worth a watch for the diet aspect and their lifestyle.

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I thought this was poignant and on subject. What kind of coffee & what kind of fruit Hagar ?

 

Sort of on topic...but as much as I have at times dreamed of glory and living a life acknolowledged by people as great and all that sort of stuff, when I think about what I really want out of my day to day life...what makes me happy is having a home, if not in the country/mountains, at least with a yard with lots of privacy, and the ability to live a nice, mostly quiet life, doing daily chores and meeting my own needs.

 

Most people can't even enjoy a day around the house with nothing going on.

 

I love to get up, do my exercises, drink tea and listen to NPR and make breakfast. Drink more tea. Do some chores. Maybe nap. Chores. Music, read, snack, chores, dog walks. Dinner. Chores. Read or music, bed. Every few days add doing something with friends.

 

So simple...but if you're a very busy person, running here and there, never turning down invitations from friends, doing all there is to do... it's hard to relax...you can't do it.

 

It takes a while to slow it down, to where you can sit in your back yard, sipping coffee/tea, perfectly content with yourself and the world...

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i need a party to travel with and remove ourselves from civilization... live off the land as nomads.

I cant do it alone... and im not about to trust complete strangers with my life >.<

-_- i want out of this world... badly... i want to go home... whever my heart is resting.... its not a "civilized" insulin diet.

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Plenty of people doing it, especially kids, these days. I see them all the time passing through town, bumming money off people, with backpacks and for some reason always bulldogs/pit bulls these days.

 

Travelers. I think you'd find a lot of creeps in that crowd, but likely also some good, like minded people.

 

I see you're very one-track-mind in your posts lately :)

Edited by i am

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im very sick of being a part of this world, weather or not i TAKE PART in it.

I've grown very hateful of civility, civilization, civillians/citizens, and all associated pursuits of technological and chemical reliance.

Im one-tracking for success. distractions arent helping me procure results.

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Ketosis is not a dietary fad, it's the primary normal mode of human functioning.

The book I mentioned earlier, "Primal Body, Primal Mind" by Nora Gedgaudas is a worthwhile read even if you are not going to try this nutritional mode, it's just good and superbly researched and useful, IMO.

 

Does any solid scientific work prove this statement? I read another works how it can be harmful for liver and adrenal glands. The problem with this theory is that it was not proved by long term practical experiment and exists only in theory. Some people use it for materials for their book, they sell it, earn money on it but do not do it themselves on long term basis.

 

 

With constant consumption of carbs, the main problem, metabolically speaking, is constant (daily and lifelong) spikes of insulin, which is the body's standard response to sugars (converted to glucose) in the bloodstream. This, however, is the abuse of the insulin system whose real primary function, in the absence of this constant jerking, is cellular repair and regeneration.

 

There is simple solution - to avoid "fast carbohydrates" and eat only twice a day. Or three times if one has fast metabolism system

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Does any solid scientific work prove this statement? I read another works how it can be harmful for liver and adrenal glands. The problem with this theory is that it was not proved by long term practical experiment and exists only in theory. Some people use it for materials for their book, they sell it, earn money on it but do not do it themselves on long term basis.

It's not a theory. The long term practical experiment was the eating patterns of all indigenous peoples before they were conquered and subdued to the "civilized" way of eating. E.g., Siberia witnessed bloody persecutions of the native peoples by the conquering Russians who demanded they plant wheat and eat bread -- disobedience punishable by death. Since both sugar and gluten are addictive drugs (via two different mechanisms that get the user hooked on internal opiates), it only takes a push of this kind in the very beginning, the next generation does not resist anymore -- especially with grain alcohol added to the advantages of this new way of life. Native Americans, the percentage who survived the genocide that is, were simply forced out of their hunting grounds, the latter mostly destroyed completely, and that was the end of their natural eating patterns. Did you know that descriptions survive, by the first white settlers, of rivers as dense with salmon as our current highway traffics are with cars, of oceans of bison, elk, buffalo without end, of an abundance of this land that made the newcomers weep bitter tears of envy and resentment? Did you know that the Inca civilization ran on llamas to the same extent ours runs on fossil fuel -- food, clothing, transportation, everything -- and that the conquering Spaniards exterminated all these llamas (millions) within the first three years of conquest? Don't even go up that shit creek without a paddle... and do look at the book I referenced for "solid scientific work," allow yourself to be amazed at how much you find when you know where to look!

Edited by Taomeow

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Damn! My coffee cup is empty. Gotta' get up off my butt and get another.

 

 

Don't kill any bison on the way to the kitchen.

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marbles i could use some of that 2000 year old honey crystals for my morning coffee.

another thing i am picky about with my coffee is the water i am using.

i reckon if i had the right mix of 2000 year old honey crystals, some choice arabica,

and that wonderful spring water i go acquire from the national forest,

it could produce a cup of coffee with qualities that would allow one to let go of their hatred for civility

and maybe in that cup or maybe in a second cup, they could find that they trusted the coffee.

i like hazlenut too and a sprinkle of nutmeg

 

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Pizarros men must have been busy! conquering the Inca And killing upwards of 14 llamas per day each , for three years.

and yet failed in their mission!

 

. Today, native people of Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Chile, and Argentina still herd llamas, which are used primarily for their wool. Llamas are gentle by nature, but if they are mistreated they can react by hissing, spitting, kicking and refusing to move.

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Would you believe that when I asked people I was connecting with in Peru what to bring them from the US, they asked for good coffee? All theirs is exported, nothing good is left for the domestic market -- they sell some processed crap in their stores, instant coffee mostly.

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I agree with Taomeow on the eating patterns, but the stuff I learned in school was that the accounts heard of the "land of abundance" with crazy amounts of game was due to the earlier exposure to Spanish explorers. The native populations had essentially been wiped out already due to the spread of disease, relative to their earlier population numbers. So the excessive amount of animals was due to a huge population crash of natives, causing an over abundance of game, right around the time that we start getting more contact, and historical accounts of what the new world was like.

 

But of course there used to be huge bison herds and salmon runs, even with a healthy environment. The idea is just that when people really first started settling, they were seeing an unbalanced ecosystem due to crashing native populations.

 

American Holocaust is a good book to read...

 

But that doesn't change the fact that for most of human existence, we weren't eating grain...

Edited by i am
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Don't kill any bison on the way to the kitchen.

No fear. They don't appear very often.

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I don't know much about Tom Petty's music but that sure is a different "Honey Bee" than the classic, well covered, Blues "Honey Bee".

 

Yeah, the 2000 year old honey would likely be pretty hard to find.

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But that doesn't change the fact that for most of human existence, we weren't eating grain...

There isn't much grain in my diet. Mostly fish, fowl and dairy.

 

I really should get back to eating oatmeal in the morning though.

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Yeah I'm having a hard time figuring out what to do right now...eating much less meat, so I'm turning to more grain. Quinoa and oats and rice and kasha, almost entirely in its whole, unground unprocessed from, but still...more grains than I used to eat.

 

I'd love to get in on the Yellowstone bison hunt, though. I haven't gone in for one of those tags, yet. Lots of controversy, but its all pretty silly. That'd be enough meat to feed me for a couple years, and have friends over for roasts and bbqs all the time.

Edited by i am

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For the best diet, go to a place of inner confidence and you can't go wrong. But it's got to be inner confidence, not internalized brainwashing!

Excerpts from an article about the documented longest lived human being ever:

Jeanne Louise Calment ( 21 February 1875 – 4 August 1997) was a French supercentenarian who had the longest confirmed human lifespan in history, living to the age of 122 years, 164 days.[3] She lived in Arles, France, for her entire life.

 

Calment's remarkable health presaged her later record. At age 85 (1960), she took up fencing, and continued to ride her bicycle up until her 100th birthday. She was reportedly neither athletic nor fanatical about her health.[10]


Calment smoked from the age of 21 (1896) to 117 (1992), drank a lot of port wine daily, and ate almost a kilogram (2.2 lb) of chocolate every week.

Edited by Taomeow

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For the best diet, go to a place of inner confidence and you can't go wrong. But it's got to be inner confidence, not internalized brainwashing!

 

Deciphering between the two takes a surprising amount of cultivation...

 

Which voice is the "brainwashing" I've been exposed to, which is the emotional craving for food and food types I don't need and aren't good of me, and which is the inner me telling me what I need?

 

Figuring that out will take time, though I think getting rid of the brain washing will be the easier part.

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