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Translators of the TTC

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The reason I like this one

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is

Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching has been translated more frequently than any other work except the Bible. Few people, however, recognize its esoteric spiritual meaning. Even if they do, they do not easily understand its practical significance without guidance from a developed practitioner of Taoist alchemy.

 

Hu Xuehi is a senior Taoist adept, and practitioner of internal alchemy, an herbalist and qigong healer, has helped people all over the world uncover their own internal medicine through the study of qigong. He spent a large part of his life seeking out true teachers of the Tao, meditating deep in the mountains and learning from rare texts of internal alchemy, as well as thoroughly studying the ancient works of Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism. Hu Xuehi currently lives and practices Taoist traditional healing in Shenyang, China.

 

 

Hu Xuehi offers his deep insight into the inner spiritual process as metaphorically described by Lao Tzu. Master Hu provides a precious bridge into the work's inner meanings. He assists the sincere seeker in practically understanding its relationship to their personal spiritual growth and cultivation. An invaluable tool and counsel for the serious practitioner as well as the lover of eternal truth.

 

 

I find the "guidance from a developed practitioner of Taoist alchemy" most helpfull ^_^

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Waysun Liao offers his translation of the TTC in his book Nine Nights with the Taoist Master, in which he embeds the chapters of the TTC in the text of a teaching novel. To me the most important thing about his translation is that it includes the input of an oral tradition, which gives it a coherence and depth I have yet to find in other translations.

 

From the age of twelve, Waysun Liao studied with a wandering Taoist and in a Taoist temple until he became a full Taichi and Tao master. Considered one of the world's foremost authorities on traditional Taoist wisdom and Chi arts, he is the founder and master of one of the oldest Taichi centers in North America, which is located in Oak Park, Illinois. He is one of the few remaining Tao masters carrying and transmitting the ancient oral traditions concerning the power of Tao, and shares his wisdom with students across the world.

 

Master Liao continues to spread the art of Tai Chi and the science of Tao by giving seminars, group and intensive training, as well as private sessions with sincere students. He wrote his first book, Tai Chi Classics, 30 years ago, and it's now translated into eight languages worldwide. His 3 newer books include Nine Nights with the Taoist Master; Chi, Discovering Your Life Energy; and his newest, just out this fall: Tao: the Way of God.

 

He has compiled a slew of video/DVDs preserving the ancient temple teachings of single form Taichi practice, and has a number of DVDs explaining the Tao (Tao Gong), all available at his website, www.taichitaocenter.com. Note: prepare for sticker shock. His trainings and DVDs are not cheap!

 

On the other hand, his information and point of view are priceless.

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hey all...

 

i kinda feel awful doing this, but please be aware that this post is my personal feeling and in now way an advertisement or an endorsement for any particular person!

 

the translation of the ttc by derek lin is a great tool for helping to understand the tao. the thing i like the most about it is how accessible the translator is... so you can hear him talk about why he translated something a certain way. he hosts a weekly meeting that is free to listen to online where he talks about the ttc and how to apply it's lessons to life.

 

i know it sounds like i am a paid spokesperson, but the ability to hear and talk to the author of a translation is pretty cool. it should also be noted that i do participate on that taoist form as well (in the interest of full disclosure).

 

now, i promise this will be the last time i ever post a message of this type! take care, and happy holidays!

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hey all...

 

i kinda feel awful doing this, ...

 

Not a problem, I think. We all (well, most of us) have our favorite translation and we take the liberty to state such. No reason why you can't.

 

BTW I like Derek's translation as well and I did buy it.

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the translation of the ttc by derek lin is a great tool for helping to understand the tao. the thing i like the most about it is how accessible the translator is... so you can hear him talk about why he translated something a certain way. he hosts a weekly meeting that is free to listen to online where he talks about the ttc and how to apply it's lessons to life.

 

Bought this book because of the recommendation and I liked the idea of annotations to explain the reasoning behind the translation. This is my first TTC book and wow, I am thoroughly enjoying it, especially with the annotations. I'd highly recommend this to everyone.

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The Tao Te Ching: a New Translation with Commentary (1989), by Ellen M. Chen.

Ellen Chen's translation with (extensive!) commentary has been very useful to me in understanding the cultural context of the TTC.
Hers is more academic/philosophical/religious approach than other translations I have liked.
Her commentary has been very useful to my understanding, and, for some reason, I think of it in its own category compared to other translations.
Anybody else using this translation?
 

cheya

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This is the translation hat I've been using. I really enjoy it, poetic and simple style.

 

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  • the first comprehensive verbatim translation of the entire text of the Tao Te Ching
  • literal character definitions that allow the reader to create his or her own interpretation
  • a concordance section that enables the reader to track the different ways a single character is used throughout the work
  • grammatical and interprative notes on individual terms and verses
  • a unique commentary on the first verse, which represents a complete spiritual teaching in itself; and
  • a literary translation of the TTC that can be read on its own or compared with the verbatim translation

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This is the translation hat I've been using. I really enjoy it, poetic and simple style.

 

 

I don't think I have ever seen that one. Sounds great.

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I don't think I have ever seen that one. Sounds great.

 

It is! :) It def. has a very poetic feel to it. I fell in love with it in Borders, I remember everything around me when I read the first few lines of verse 1 for my first time ever. It was like my mind opened up a complete new "gate". It's really a beautiful translation and if you like that kind of writing I suggest you get this one. haha

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It is! :) It def. has a very poetic feel to it. I fell in love with it in Borders, I remember everything around me when I read the first few lines of verse 1 for my first time ever. It was like my mind opened up a complete new "gate". It's really a beautiful translation and if you like that kind of writing I suggest you get this one. haha

 

Yes, it is a nice feeling when we have those thought connections, especially if the thoughts recalled are positive ones.

 

Maybe I'll get to that one one day. I still have a couple translations here at the house I picked up at a used book store a few weeks ago that I haven't looked at yet. (That gives me another reason to keep on living. Hehehe.)

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A day late, I just placed my order on Amazon for Hamill's (sp) translation. I really enjoyed the poetic quality. My original got stolen, just not overly satisfied with the Feng/English version I picked up as a substitute.

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My original got stolen, ...

 

Well, at least someone beside yourself thought it was of value. That's good.

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Well, at least someone beside yourself thought it was of value. That's good.

 

They thought they were getting a laptop in that briefcase, instead they got TTC and a copy of Roberto Belano's Savage Detectives. It probably got ditched in an ally somewhere, hopefully someone picked through and got some use out of the books.

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I am a bit surprised that no one has mentioned the Stephen Mitchell translation. It's the only one I've read and the only one so far that speaks to my Being. Anyone else read it? What did you think?

The only other person I know that has read it is my mom LOL.

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I am a bit surprised that no one has mentioned the Stephen Mitchell translation. It's the only one I've read and the only one so far that speaks to my Being. Anyone else read it? What did you think?

The only other person I know that has read it is my mom LOL.

 

I have a copy of his translation here on the shelf that I bought a little while back at a used bood store. I haven't actually read it but I have referred to it a few times to get his take on a particular chapter. I have heard a number of people state that his is their favorite translation.

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I am a bit surprised that no one has mentioned the Stephen Mitchell translation. It's the only one I've read and the only one so far that speaks to my Being. Anyone else read it? What did you think?

The only other person I know that has read it is my mom LOL.

 

opps! see below

Edited by boB

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mariawrites, the good thing is that you have brought it up and caused it to leave my shelf. I was given this copy 22 years ago by some dear friends. This translation also speaks to me, I think because my coming of age was in the the Southern California 60's and it seems to impart some feelings of that time but in a timeless way.

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I appreciate the reminder about the great number of translations and interpretations there have been. I also get a smile from the stories about Lao Tzu's birth, especially the one about him being the result of his mother's union with a shooting star, and his having been born with a full head of sparkling white hair. I can't help but think he had a twinkle in his eye as well.

stan

Edited by stan herman
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Hi,

my first experience of Taoist writings was Gia-Fu-Feng's inner chapters of Chuang Tzu. Out of all the translations of the Tao te ching I like Gia-fu-feng's the best. There is another translation which can be downloaded for free on the life-in-crisis.info web site which is supposedly a true translation directly from Lao Tzu through the Shaman Flowing Hands. After reading it there are some chapters that are completely different to any others I've ever read!

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Hi,

my first experience of Taoist writings was Gia-Fu-Feng's inner chapters of Chuang Tzu. Out of all the translations of the Tao te ching I like Gia-fu-feng's the best. There is another translation which can be downloaded for free on the life-in-crisis.info web site which is supposedly a true translation directly from Lao Tzu through the Shaman Flowing Hands. After reading it there are some chapters that are completely different to any others I've ever read!

 

Someone else mentioned that before but I took no action on it. I now have a copy of in on my computer's hard drive and will read it when I get around to it.

 

Thanks.

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415KEXYNHXL._SL500_AA300_.jpgThe Wisdom of Laotse by Lin Yutang.

 

It also has many companion references from Chuangtse. This was my first book on the TTC, and I still read it weekly.

Edited by Task
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It also has many companion references from Chuangtse. This was my first book on the TTC, and I still read it weekly.

 

I think you made an excellent first choice!

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I came upon a very old hardback copy at my library...falling apart at the seams, stained etc. Read it cover to cover and bought another online. My most treasured book.

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Hi Everyone!

I've been off line for quite a while. But I recently read a wonderful translation of the Tao Teh Jing-

Titled The Secret Tao - by D.W. Kegler I think that is correct spelling, not sure)...

He offers the text in Chinese in a direct sort of broken english and an interpretation of his own that offers a fresh take for me.

His introduction is also really great as it tenders an enlightening view of early Taoist history.-Peace.

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