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Asteroid To Impact Earth On November the 2nd, 2020

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.... that is, of course , after we wait and see if it DOES hit the earth   

 

:D

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Posted (edited)

I was just reminded of that Bradbury short story, "A Sound of Thunder."  What a visionary!  Remember how it was all connected -- the butterfly-sized change to the timeline that changed two things -- the spelling of words and the outcome of the world-changing presidential elections!

Edited by Taomeow
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On 8/25/2020 at 8:07 AM, SirPalomides said:

 

To misquote Cavafy, "Now what's going to happen to us without an asteroid? That asteroid was a kind of solution."

 

On 8/25/2020 at 9:23 AM, Taomeow said:

 

My thought exactly.

mp,550x550,gloss,ffffff,t.3u6.jpg

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The asteroid is going to miss us by a long shot & I've never even seen a news article saying otherwise. I think it's really pitiful that so many people want it to hit the Earth.

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Posted (edited)

Anyway the size of the asteroid would not achieve the desired result. It would mostly break up in the atmosphere. Sorry folks.

 

By comparison the dinosaur-killer asteroid is estimated to have been at least 11 kilometers wide.

Edited by SirPalomides
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A while back, (4 years?),

someone here asked me

who I was voting for? 

I answered 'I vote meteor'.

 

thelerner for the win B)

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Isn't it true that some folks have been struck by meteors and survived?

 

So perhaps meteor is just a wake up, knock on the head and not a kill shot.

 

hmm...

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Now if that little meteor contains a flesh-eating ball of jello, or a weird alien colour that makes everything weird, crazy, or dead, then we might be talking.

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1 hour ago, silent thunder said:

Isn't it true that some folks have been struck by meteors and survived?

 

So perhaps meteor is just a wake up, knock on the head and not a kill shot.

 

hmm...

 

I remember a story -- I think it was on the local news, a long time ago and in an altogether different location --

so, this woman was about to make breakfast and was standing in her kitchen with the frying pan in her hands, trying to decide -- scrambled or sunny side up?  -- and a meteor pierced through the roof of her house and fell into her frying pan.  

 

I wonder how she interpreted the message.  I'd be scratching my head for sure.  

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My thoughts ran to knitting a fire proof/shark proof suit.

Some sorta dual usefulness.

Stand in shoulder depth water to mitigate heat and impact?

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4 hours ago, silent thunder said:

Isn't it true that some folks have been struck by meteors and survived?

 

So perhaps meteor is just a wake up, knock on the head and not a kill shot.

 

hmm...

 

 

You mean ... its going to hit Trump in the head ?

 

When  I was staying up at the Lodge on the mountain my house mate got very excited one night . She used to like sitting out on the lawn at night as we had a great view of land and sky .  She saw a 'streaking light' come down, land in the paddock next door and  bounce once and dissipated .  We looked in the morning but could not find anything , or any burnt grass or any trace  :(   ... would have loved it for my rock collection .

 

We  ( the planet) gain 40,000 tonnes  of space material   each year !   About once a year we get one as big as a car .  About 17 a day hit the ground . 

 

Being hit by one ? 

 

Three months ago, for example, a small asteroid probably about the size of a minivan, flashed across the midday sky and exploded over western Cuba, showering the town of Viñales with falling rocks, some of which reportedly landed on rooftops. 

 

( I find that very interesting as  some desert Aboriginals   have said the spirits sometimes pelt them with rocks from the sky  ....  and where scoffed at. )

 

To calculate how often such meteor falls occur, Gonzalo Tancredi, an astronomer at the University of the Republic in Montevideo, Uruguay, examined a database of incident reports, discovering that in the last 95 years people have directly observed 95 such events – an average of about eight per year.

 

To figure out how many others occur unobserved, Tancredi noted that people only occupy a tiny fraction of the Earth’s surface — about 0.44% of its land area, or 0.13% of its total surface area.

 

That means that for every impact that is actually seen by someone, another 770 splash into the sea or fall in a desert, forest, or other locations so remote that nobody sees it happen.

 

“Some places on the Earth are heavily populated,” Tancredi says, “but most places are very lowly populated.”

 

Tancredi then got to wondering if such impacts might occur in swarms. He wondered, in fact, whether there is a time of year at which the chances of being hit by a falling rock — however low they are, on average — might be elevated.

 

“The falls are random throughout the year,” he says. “There is no particular date of the year to be outdoors with a helmet.”

 

Manx comets.

 

These are comets so inactive that they do not produce visible tails. Their activity is five to six orders of magnitude lower than that of typical comets.

 

Like normal comets, however, they dive deep into the inner solar system from origins well beyond the orbit of Pluto, and possibly close to the boundary of interstellar space.

 

That means that when they reach us, they are coming in hard and fast. Their lack of tail-forming volatiles also means they are rocky and dense, capable of hitting with enormous amounts of energy.

 

Worse, the lack of tails makes them hard to spot until they are practically upon us. If you are looking for a disaster-movie scenario, a Manx comet, not seen until less than a month before impact, might be as good as it gets. 

 

https://cosmosmagazine.com/

Edited by Nungali

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2 hours ago, Taomeow said:

 

I remember a story -- I think it was on the local news, a long time ago and in an altogether different location --

so, this woman was about to make breakfast and was standing in her kitchen with the frying pan in her hands, trying to decide -- scrambled or sunny side up?  -- and a meteor pierced through the roof of her house and fell into her frying pan.  

 

I wonder how she interpreted the message.  I'd be scratching my head for sure.  

 

So .... the eggs ended up scrambled ?

 

 

tumblr_mcvn33dIVl1qkss26o1_1280.jpg

 

 

https://www.kimbalikes.com/breakfast-in-bed-meteor-showers/

 

 

 

,

Edited by Nungali
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sunnyside up

w/hash browns and pork sausage

and a healthy dash of cholula

 

all mixed up in a bowl

 

I have a meteor I happened upon, sitting next to my breakfast bowl...

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I remember a photo of one woman who was hit by a meteor.  A pictures showed a big black and blue mark on her thigh. 

Amazing she wasn't vaporized, but she's very very very lucky(????), one way or another.

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