SirPalomides

Paintings you like

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

It says paintings but any 2-dimensional art is fine.

 

Here's one of my all-time favorites, Ivan Aivazovsky's Darial Gorge

 

Darial Gorge, 1862 - Ivan Aivazovsky

Edited by SirPalomides
  • Like 8
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wanderer above the Sea of Fog (1818)

Wanderer above the Sea of Fog (1818) – Caspar David Friedrich

 

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, moment said:

Wanderer above the Sea of Fog (1818)

Wanderer above the Sea of Fog (1818) – Caspar David Friedrich

 


That is a great painting. A very good friend of mine has an image of that in his studio. He happens to be one of the great landscape painters on the planet and I am fortunate to own one of his paintings. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, ralis said:


That is a great painting. A very good friend of mine has an image of that in his studio. He happens to be one of the great landscape painters on the planet and I am fortunate to own one of his paintings. 

 

Always good to hear from you, ralis!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

“Warning Mother” by Leonora Carrington. IMO one of the greatest of the surrealist painters, better than the overrated douche Dali and the mediocre Magritte, but they unjustly are the famous ones.

69A0F2AA-7227-47D3-8945-40F75D8FB5DD.jpeg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, SirPalomides said:

“Warning Mother” by Leonora Carrington. IMO one of the greatest of the surrealist painters, better than the overrated douche Dali and the mediocre Magritte, but they unjustly are the famous ones.

69A0F2AA-7227-47D3-8945-40F75D8FB5DD.jpeg

 

I don't entirely agree.  Leonora was inspired by the occult.  Dali mostly was inspired by fits of paronoia.  They were both very good in their own ways.  The foundation that they sprang off of was this person:

9.jpg

 

 

The Song of Love (1914) - Giorgio de Chirico

 

The Song of Love (1914) – Giorgio de Chirico

 

Edited by moment
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, moment said:

 

I don't entirely agree.  Leonora was inspired by the occult.  Dali mostly was inspired by fits of paronoia.  They were both very good in their own ways.  The foundation that they sprang off of was this person:

9.jpg

 

 

The Song of Love (1914) - Giorgio de Chirico

 

The Song of Love (1914) – Giorgio de Chirico

 


Dali invented the paranoiac critical technique which as I recall was a deliberate induction of paranoia- for instance, you go for a walk and see a crow, and then deliberately read crow-like patterns into all the surrounding architecture or landscape.  It is an interesting artistic exercise for sure. As for his motivations... well I think Andre Breton was write to dub him with the anagram “Avida Dollars.”

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SirPalomides said:


Dali invented the paranoiac critical technique which as I recall was a deliberate induction of paranoia- for instance, you go for a walk and see a crow, and then deliberately read crow-like patterns into all the surrounding architecture or landscape.  It is an interesting artistic exercise for sure. As for his motivations... well I think Andre Breton was write to dub him with the anagram “Avida Dollars.”

 There is no doubt that Dali later abandoned, much of the surrealistic philosophy in favor of capitalism.  But, that does not negate the worth of his ealier works.

The only thing I have ever held against him on a personal level, is that he was an avowed fascist, that supported that monster Franco. 

 

As to your initial post on Leonora Carrington, she was a master storyteller.  Have you ever read her short story "The Debutante"?

It gives real insight into how her head worked.

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had read some of her short stories years ago and I honestly don’t remember much except enjoying them. I should revisit them.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Fu Xi discovering the trigrams (dragon horse to the left). Painted by Qiu Ying (16th century)

A4B159F7-5506-4AE0-9474-EC4EEFCCFEAA.jpeg

Edited by SirPalomides
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Nice thread. 

 

Paintings I like are many.  Where do I start?  Landscape, portrait, still life, allegory, alchemy?  Europe, Asia, the Americas, Africa?  Recent, ancient, well-known, mostly unknown?  OK, let's start somewhere...  last in first out?  A contemporary Ukrainian artist, Yevgeny Leshchenko.  A classical naïvist.  Here's from his cats series:

 

21687172_1496363160442407_4710979376487356722_o-1.thumb.jpg.6c9e2b771520e97f5e5a70c4b08fe4af.jpg

 

 

21762499_1496366710442052_2033418848341353525_o.thumb.jpg.1614848f0b1b34cb3ec0f5ccbd3db3ef.jpg

 

 

21617863_1496370850441638_4003130409054570962_n.thumb.jpg.96320ae602fae4faa2495a173a2d12fb.jpg

 

 

21687419_1496362297109160_1590744148693533146_n-1.thumb.jpg.8132e053e8ebe3aea9b22016007cf875.jpg

 

 

 

 

21740530_1496361990442524_5814114050820937050_n.jpg

Edited by Taomeow
  • Like 8
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, Taomeow said:

Nice thread. 

 

Paintings I like are many.  Where do I start?  Landscape, portrait, still life, allegory, alchemy?  Europe, Asia, the Americas, Africa?  Recent, ancient, well-known, mostly unknown?  OK, let's start somewhere...  last in first out?  A contemporary Ukrainian artist, Yevgeny Leshchenko.  A classical naïvist.  Here's from his cats series:

 

21687172_1496363160442407_4710979376487356722_o-1.thumb.jpg.6c9e2b771520e97f5e5a70c4b08fe4af.jpg

 

 

21762499_1496366710442052_2033418848341353525_o.thumb.jpg.1614848f0b1b34cb3ec0f5ccbd3db3ef.jpg

 

 

21617863_1496370850441638_4003130409054570962_n.thumb.jpg.96320ae602fae4faa2495a173a2d12fb.jpg

 

 

21687419_1496362297109160_1590744148693533146_n-1.thumb.jpg.8132e053e8ebe3aea9b22016007cf875.jpg

 

 

 

 

21740530_1496361990442524_5814114050820937050_n.jpg

 

That was fun!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m surprised I never heard of that Visit to William Blake’s Inn Book- that looks fantastic. And thanks Taomeow for the Leschenko paintings, they’re gorgeous.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, SirPalomides said:

I’m surprised I never heard of that Visit to William Blake’s Inn Book- that looks fantastic. And thanks Taomeow for the Leschenko paintings, they’re gorgeous.

 

I think the old 70s and 80s children's books honestly have artwork worthy of galleries. The author of Strega Nona to me has more feeling and soul to it than a lot of the digital stuff made using Flash vectors and PhotoShop. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love Strega Nona, I got my own copy signed by Tomi DiPaola actually. There are actually still plenty of amazing children’s book illustrators- it is actually a great place to look for traditional fine art. Among my favorites are Russian artist Gennady Spirin and Japanese-American KY Kraft. I’ll dig up some images.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Here’s a Gennady Spirin illustration from the Lord is My Shepherd and another one from the Sea King’s Daughter (based on the story of Sadko) 

 

C155C398-29EF-46B2-920E-6EE4BB3ED959.jpeg

7C54C950-85F9-4E21-BEB2-376598EC9A84.jpeg

Edited by SirPalomides
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Taomeow might like this one by Remedios Varo, the Paradise of Cats. Like Leonora Carrington she is a surrealist with a big inspiration from occult and alchemical images (it is more obvious in some of her other paintings)

8A7AF1AB-26EF-4F71-8E9B-11EBA7D69E96.jpeg

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool! :) 

 

Reminded me of another painting -- an illustration a local artist friend, Anna Sobko, made to a chapter from my novel-to-be which I read to a few people.  (Anna used to be an animated movies director at Moldova-Film, the Moldovan film studio and production company that ceased to exist with the demise of the Soviet Union.)  She didn't get my point though.  The snow leopard in that episode was very young and inexperienced, and the ibex was huge, way too big for her to take on.  In Anna's rendition, the cat is not really challenged -- her situation is more like the first one of those Picasso paintings, whereas in my chapter it was, pound for pound, worse than in his second.   

 

0-5.jpg.395088b4928209503ec68c9e6269371f.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I’ve seen of Soviet animations, they had some enormously innovative and talented people working on them.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites