yuuichi

Why aren’t important Daoist texts being translated into english?

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 For crying out loud! Woo Hu said, just get the average of three and move on! 

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On 4/12/2019 at 2:38 AM, yuuichi said:

To clarify, I already speak and read Chinese. But to understand Daoist texts, you need to be a native speaker at least. 

 

 

If that was true , then all the native speakers would all agree, on the meat of it, 

and when they wrote their translations, 

they would be similar and mutually supportive. 

Native speaking Chinese have indeed written translations

, and they do not all agree,

so being a native speaker of Chinese means precisely , nothing. 

Either one understands what they are reading , or they do not ,

be it a good translation , or be it in modern-rendered Chinese.  

 

To translate , modern folks draw on hundreds of sources ,

they put down on paper their findings, 

So there are many people from whom you can get a distilled version

of the knowledge of literally hundreds of other authors ,and other very smart people. 

 

Who is the reader that they should second-guess one of these experts? 

Why should one expect to end up knowing More than an expert? 

Does the expert more accurately understand with each adherent reader? 

And if the number of adherents is not directly correlated with the accuracy of the rendering ,

then by what means would one determine which the one true representation of the data would be?

 

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From what I've gathered here and there, it seems Classical Chinese relates to Modern Chinese, in a similar manner that Olde English relates to Modern English.

 

 

I studied Olde English in University and have some comfort in it, but as much as it's similar to modern english, it's more like a foreign language for all it's subtle differences.  This is exacerbated when it comes to the cultural connotations and subtle meanings built into phrases that were dependent upon the overal unspoken understandings of the people of the day who spoke it.  These phrases and unspoken assumptions that were shared by the folks of that day which were reflected in the differences of their speech are where the real difficulties of deep understanding and comprehension come into play for clear interpretation in my estimation.

 

Your mileage may vary.  Either you find a translator you trust and resonate with, take up the task yourself, or resign yourself to partial information. 

 

In the end, all that was spoken about in ancient texts, is about human process.  That process is ongoing and so, the actual processes and answers you seek are within your mind, form and innate nature.  Explore that perhaps and let the texts lie where they are.

 

I learn plenty on a walk through the woods.

 

I find there are more miracles in a square meter of earth, than in all the scrolls, books and libraries of the modern world... combined.

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Incidentally, I just recalled I know a guy who translates Greek, Latin and Sanskrit for fun, in his spare time.  It's relaxing and good mental exercise simultaneously.   For him anyway.

 

There are people who translate for the joy, for the process, not profit.  They can be found on the interwebs should you have something you really desire to have crossed over.

 

Also incidentally, regarding paid translations... exchange of money does not imply quality and professional does not always imply more accurate or better, it can just mean 'i get paid for this', or 'i charge money when i do this'.

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I have not pursued this but I know of one institute that is solely dedicated to translating Tibetan works. It may well be that there is an English institute or group dedicated to translating the texts you would like to have translated and perhaps you could find such a group and present them with your list.

 

there is no question that as this relates to relatively esoteric teaching the translators would need to be very very specialized. A slight turn of a phrase can entirely change the messaging.

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On 5/8/2019 at 7:39 PM, Spotless said:

I have not pursued this but I know of one institute that is solely dedicated to translating Tibetan works.

 

Would you mind providing a link? I'm curious.

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4 minutes ago, GreytoWhite said:

 

Would you mind providing a link? I'm curious.

They are in Berkeley CA and bought a huge building there about 20 years ago from from the previous owners - who were The Berkeley Psychic Institute which was quite large at the time and had many institutes.

 

When I am in Berkeley this week I’ll stop by and find out their name.

 

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1 minute ago, Spotless said:

They are in Berkeley CA and bought a huge building there about 20 years ago from from the previous owners - who were The Berkeley Psychic Institute which was quite large at the time and had many institutes.

 

When I am in Berkeley this week I’ll stop by and find out their name.

 

 

Thank you! I'm aware of BDK America but I'm always looking for new resources. Got a Tibetan empowerment last January so it's of interest to me.

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On 4/11/2019 at 11:38 PM, yuuichi said:

To clarify, I already speak and read Chinese. But to understand Daoist texts, you need to be a native speaker at least. 

 

 

 

 

Or one could already be at place described by the text,  they dont need to understand what they are.

 

Quote

"Master, I have no peace of mind."

"Let me hear what you know already. After hearing from you an answer to this query, I shall tell you what I can."

 

Narada opened his book of knowledge and narrated a list of the sciences and the arts in which he was proficient. "Master, I know every science and every art in the world: metaphysics, theory of knowledge, astronomy, physics, chemistry, biology, psychology, psycho-analysis, aesthetics, ethics, sociology, political science, culture, religion, philosophy. There is nothing that I do not know, but I have no peace of mind.

 

I do not know myself.

 

"

The great master replied, "All this that you have learned is a bundle of words, with no content inside. You have smeared your personality with a veneer of apparent knowledge, but you are quite different from that which you have gathered on your personality. The shirt is not the person and, therefore, your learning is not what you are."

https://www.swami-krishnananda.org/sadh/sadh_01.html

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