yuuichi

Would you give up pleasure for equanimity?

Would you give up pleasure for equanimity?  

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  1. 1. Hypothetical scenario: You are rich, famous, and live a life of luxury and pleasure. You still desire to enjoy this life of luxury. One day, a monk knocks on your door. He tells you that at no expense, he will offer to teach you to reach Nibbana within a short time. He says that upon reaching Nibbana, you will feel everlasting peace and contentment, but as a result of no longer experiencing desire, you will no longer derive pleasure from your wealth, your wife or anything about your lifestyle (the brain will no longer be affected by the reward (dopamine) pathway as there is no desire to reward). Would you agree to his offer?

    • Yes, I would give up pleasure for equanimity (it is better to experience equanimity than to experience pleasure, so to give up pleasure for equanimity is to gain, not lose anything)
    • No, I would not give up pleasure for equanimity (it is better to experience pleasure than equanimity, especially if one has the wealth, luxury and wisdom to reduce suffering by being sensible)
    • I will tell the monk to come back in 40 years, and let me enjoy my life now in hedonistic pleasure (Both pleasure and equanimity are of equal value, so if I attain Nibbana and still retain the memory of a lifetime of common pleasures, then that is the best of both)

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  • Poll closed on 10/21/2018 at 09:00 AM

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Hypothetical scenario: You are rich, famous, and live a life of luxury and pleasure. You still desire to enjoy this life of luxury. One day, a monk knocks on your door. He tells you that at no expense, he will offer to teach you to reach Nibbana within a short time. He says that upon reaching Nibbana, you will feel everlasting peace and contentment, but as a result of no longer experiencing desire, you will no longer derive pleasure from your wealth, your wife or anything about your lifestyle (the brain will no longer be affected by the reward (dopamine) pathway as there is no desire to reward). Would you agree to his offer?

Edited by yuuichi
for a more accurate choice of words

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The other thread I posted related to this one, a lot of the discussion was too abstract or off-topic. So I made up this hypothetical scenario to keep discussions on topic and informative.

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I'm making it public as well.  I voted no.  Reason:  I enjoy my emotions.  I used to enjoy my desires back when I had them.  I will never be an apatheist.  (I just mentioned that elsewhere.)

 

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I don’t acknowledge the validity of the scenario. Can’t you have both? It’s not as if they’re mutually exclusive. In fact they form half of the four immeasurables, or since you’re keen on Pali terms,  tbe four appamanna.

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there is no difference between joy and equanimity. What you are calling "joy" is actually pleasure. Joy comes as a result of dropping of positions (which is in essence equanimity). Joy is your true nature. 

Pleasures are on the other hand reflection of the joy you have within you. Only you don't know that and so seek it in objects (this and that). 

Edited by dwai
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It's a false premise imo, and my response would be something closer to a smile or quiet laughter before offering a Dr Pepper.

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Absolutely no. Pleasure and desire are life. You can attain equanimity by making the right choices in each moment.

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Is nibbana(nirvana?) just peace and equanimity? no supernatural anything?

 

No :lol:, why would I leave the lifepath I want to live and listen to this monk guy ... unless pre existent circumstances led me to the other path

 

I voted the last: I will tell the monk to come back in 40 years, and let me enjoy my life now in hedonistic pleasure (Both pleasure and equanimity are of equal value, so if I attain Nibbana and still retain the memory of a lifetime of common pleasures, then that is the best of both)

Edited by King Jade
I want
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I submitted no because the premise is invalid. "Enlightenment" must be earned. It cannot be given from one to another. Doesn't work like that. It is only through the process of enlightening that one learns to give up attachments. This process cannot be short circuited, except possibly by death. Perhaps not even then. Being not-dead I have limited knowledge of that domain.

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