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dawei

[DDJ Meaning] Chapter 26

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I've fallen behind quite a bit on keeping up on this... I'm going to revive it with some new translators.   I don't intend to include all of this in the future but would accept comments on them.

 

Chapter 26:

 

Legge


Gravity is the root of lightness; stillness, the ruler of movement.

Therefore a wise prince, marching the whole day, does not go far 
from his baggage waggons.

Although he may have brilliant prospects to look at, he quietly remains (in his proper place), indifferent to them.

How should the lord of a myriad chariots carry himself lightly before the kingdom? If he do act lightly, he has lost his root (of gravity); if he proceed to active movement, he will lose his throne. 

 

Ta-Kao

 

Heaviness is the basis of lightness; Calmness is the controlling power of hastiness.
Therefore the Sage, though traveling all day long, Never separates from his baggage-wagon; Though surrounded with magnificent sights, He lives in tranquillity.
How is it, then, that a king of ten thousand chariots Should conduct himself so lightly in the empire?
To be light is to lose the basis; To be hasty is to lose the controlling power.

 

Hinton

 

Heavy is the root of light,
and tranquil the ruler of reckless.
A sage traveling all day is never far from the supplies in his cart, and however spectacular the views he remains calm and composed.
How can a lord having ten thousand chariots act lightly in governing all beneath heaven?
Act lightly and you lose your source-root.
Act recklessly and you lose your rule.

 

 

Lok Sang Ho

 

We keep our weight, so we will not lose our roots.

We keep our serenity, so we will not lose our poise.

For these reasons when the Sage travels all day, he does not part from his heavy luggage wagon.

He sits quietly, untouched by the magnificent views.

What a pity it is then to see the lord of ten thousand chariots losing his weight in front of his people!

If one loses one’s weight, one also loses one’s base.

If one loses one’s serenity, one also loses one’s poise.

 

Laozi advises that keeping one’s weight can treat problems related to “not having taken a deep root,” and keeping still can treat problems related to restlessness. How would one keep one’s weight and not be moved by one’s own emotions and peoples’ words of praise or insult? One needs to have faith in the Dao—in the virtues of humility and down-to-earth preparations(example of the farmer). The Buddha is said to have the virtue of not being moved by the “eight winds,” namely profit, loss, damage, honor, praise, jeers, unpleasant feelings, and pleasant feelings. 45 Laozi stresses the necessity to keep one’s base , and then one will not be easily swayed by circumstances. The necessity to keep one’s base is important for everyone, but even more so for those with power or those in the leadership of a country.

 

Derek Lin

 

Heaviness is the root of lightness.

Quietness is the master of restlessness

Therefore the sage travels the entire day

Without leaving the heavy supplies

Even though there are luxurious sights

He is composed and transcends beyond

How can the lord of ten thousand chariots

Applies himself lightly to the world?

To be light is to lose one's root

To be restless is to lose one's mastery

 

Heaviness, or gravitas, lies at the root of human affairs. Lightness, or gaiety, dances carelessly above them. Those who are quiet, unmoved, deliberate and composed possess power over those who are noisy, restless, impulsive and impatient.

Therefore, the sage traverses the Tao an entire day without ever losing track of the essentials of life. Even though there are many colorful sights of luxuries along the way, the sage recognizes them as illusory, and so remains perfectly composed and unmoved, transcending beyond the temptation.

How, then, can the king, who rules the force of ten thousand war chariots, treat lightly the serious task of governing the kingdom?

To be "light," in this context, is to be disconnected from the important foundation of life. In a similar way, being restless or unstable is to lose one's power of mastery - the power of the true self!

 

 

Ni

 

Centeredness is the cure for impulsiveness.
Serenity is the master of restlessness.
Knowing this, one of universal nature is placid and never departs from the center of his own being.
Though he may move about all day,
he never loses his poise.
Though he may be surrounded by splendor and comfort,
he is always dispassionate and undistracted.
For one with great responsibility,
to conduct himself lightly is perilous.
In frivolity, one's root is lost.
In restlessness, one's self-mastery could go with the wind!

 

 

Chan

 

The heavy is the root of the light. The tranquil is the ruler of the hasty.

Therefore the sage travels all day Without leaving his baggage. Even at the sight of magnificent scenes He remains leisurely and indifferent.

How is it that a lord with ten thousand chariots Should behave lightheartedly in his empire?

If he is lighthearted, the minister will be destroyed. If he is hasty, the ruler is lost.

 

 

Chen

 

The heavy (chung) is root (ken) to the light (ch'ing);

The tranquil (ching) is master (chün) to the agitated (tsao).

Therefore the sage travels all day,

Without leaving (li) his baggage wagon (tzu chung).

Although he has glorious palaces (yung kuan),

He avoids its sumptuous apartments (yen-ch'u).

How could the Lord of ten thousand chariots,

Conduct himself lightly in the world?

One who acts lightly loses his foundation (pen);

One who is agitated loses his master (chün).

 

 

Flowing Hands

 

When one is full of Dao, there is stillness and peace.

When one is empty of Dao, there is disorder and unrest. 

The Sage resides forever in stillness and peace, therefore he is full of Dao.

Though there are beautiful things all around him, he remains at one and unattached. 

When there is disorder and unrest, the Dao is lost;  stillness and peace give way to loss of control.  

 

Moss Roberts

 

As weight anchors lightness
And calm governs impulse,
The wise leader, all day on the march,
Stays by his stockage train
Within his guarded cordon,
Safely positioned, beyond harm’s reach.
Could the lord of ten thousand wagons of war
Risk his own self for the sake of the world?
Let such lightness lose him his anchoring base?
Such impulse his rule?

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Well, I'm disappointed you didn't include Herricks and Red Pine.

 

I should apologize for saying that but I'm not going to.

 

But to the chapter:

 

A generalized warning to pay attention to affairs at hand.  If we lose awareness we will likely lose much more as a result.

 

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On 12/29/2017 at 7:46 AM, Marblehead said:

Well, I'm disappointed you didn't include Herricks and Red Pine.

 

I should apologize for saying that but I'm not going to.

 

But to the chapter:

 

A generalized warning to pay attention to affairs at hand.  If we lose awareness we will likely lose much more as a result.

 

 

Henricks translates on the oldest versions... so it seems best to leave him out.    Red Pine.   I don't have the most recent translation.

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10 minutes ago, dawei said:

 

Henricks translates on the oldest versions... so it seems best to leave him out.    Red Pine.   I don't have the most recent translation.

I was only messing with you.  My Red Pine hard copy in 1996.  I have read through it quickly only once.  I really should read it again allowing time for deliberation of his words.

 

 

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This is one of the DDJ Chapters that originally drew me into the DDJ... through Waysun Liao's translation in Nine Nights with the Taoist Master...

He comments on it as the importance of maintaining the connection to Dao or source (the heavy baggage, or, better, the supply train), taking care not to be distracted by changing external circumstances... I love this chapter! 

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I think this is saying not to go out of oneself to find anything but to stay inside your self and let your vehicle go.. or become light.. and understand the inner peace of mind!

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I read it as suggesting that one be aware and attend to their root principles. Not to be goofing off, being sloppy, or charging around based on the immediate 'carrots and sticks'. Its easy to be pulled off from center , lured or driven. ( I am aware of this keenly)

So the winds metaphor of Lok Sang Ho seems apt , to me. 

Edited by Stosh
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Case 7 of the Gateless Gate:
A monk asked Master Zhaozhou: "I have just entered the monastery. Please teach me."

Zhaozhou asked a question of his own: "Have you eaten your rice porridge?"

The monk replied: "I have."

Zhaozhou said: "Then you had better wash your bowl."

At that moment the monk understood the Way.

A dunce once searched for a fire with a lighted lantern.
Had he known what fire was,
He could have cooked his rice much sooner
.

The marvelous expanse of the Way is there in washing the bowl. What else can a sage do but attend to this ordinary moment?

 

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Free jazz

Ch 26

GOD

G=7, O=15, D=4

7+15+4=26

2.6.2018 THE DAY TO COME

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On 2/5/2018 at 7:55 PM, Marblehead said:

You lost me with that one.

 

 

He explained the month and day but not the year... so this might be posted every year on this day. 

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