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Hello, my name is Leah and I am a Qigong and Nei gong instructor from the Shaolin Kung Fu and Mei Hua Qigong Lineage. Greetings!

You have a very informative and well rounded forum here and I am just getting acquainted with the process. Thank you.

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Hello QiBody, and welcome.

 

Your membership is approved and we're happy you found your way to us. We look forward to accompanying you on some of the way that you still have to go.

 

Please take the time to read the two posts pinned at the top of this Welcome page and take a look at the forum terms and rules. This covers all you need to know when getting started.

 

For the first week you will be restricted to ten posts per day but after that you can post as much as you like.¬†Also, until you‚Äôve posted fifteen times in the forums, you‚Äôll be a ‚ÄúJunior Bum‚ÄĚ with somewhat restricted access and will be allowed only two private messages per day.

 

Good luck in your pursuits and best wishes to you,

 

Marblehead and the TDB team

 

 

Hi Leah,

 

Yes, get comfortable then get involved in the discussions, Okay?

 

You are welcome to jump right in ongoing discussions, revive an older thread, start a new thread of your own, or start a discussion in the "Newcomer Corner" sub-forms to expand on your introduction or ask general questions to help you get started.

 

May you enjoy your time here.

 

Marblehead

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Thank you for the warm welcome! I am new to the forum, and looking forward to engaging. I am a practitioner and instructor of an internal martial art Qigong, which in this part of the world (western) is fairly obscure, but it appears there is a wellspring of the internal arts at Dao Bums. 

 

 

 

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welcome,  can you share a little about what is martial qigong how is it different from qigong.

Some have referred to taiji as a type of martial qigong, your thoughts on this?

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Hello windwalker,

apologies for the slow reply, but I just came across your question. I can only speak from my personal experience. My sifu is a Shaolin Kung Fu Grand master and a Mei Hua Qigong Grand Master. His name is GM John (Chi Yuan) Tsai; in his youth he was a champion competitor and applauded as a coach of champions. I only say this to demonstrate what he was always saying, "There are philosophers of Qi and there are farmers of Qi, I am the latter." For GM Tsai as a competitor his Qi skills had to be real, not imagined. I apprenticed with GM Tsai as a man in his 60's. The internal cultivation skills he taught me come from his training with a true Shaolin Warrior, who fought the Japanese in Taiwan. Everything he teaches is all a part of his martial art training. I do not study external Kung Fu, but the internal skills I practice are for the cultivation of a person whether they practice external martial art or not.

I believe I will develop a reputation on this forum as being long winded, so walk with me just a while longer. To answer your question, perhaps it is intention and application of the technique. I also studied some Tai chi. You know that sweet beginning movement in many forms where you raise the two hands and then sink down again? One Tai Chi teacher explained that the martial aspect of that movement was raising the palms to claw out the opponents eyes. I prefer to raise earth energy up and sink into the ground, but who knows. My training contained a dynamic component to build strong qi as both a defense and for penetration, but I interpret the skills in ways that relate to my life and needs.

I have seen Tai chi as a martial art competition and as a way for elderly people to soften and balance. 

How about you, why do you practice?

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Leah, hello and welcome!

 

It feels like the martial qigong you describe, and your practice, is motion of the subtle. Very nice to read your words. (-:

 

warm greetings

rene

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3 hours ago, QiBody said:

Hello windwalker,

apologies for the slow reply, but I just came across your question. I can only speak from my personal experience. My sifu is a Shaolin Kung Fu Grand master and a Mei Hua Qigong Grand Master. His name is GM John (Chi Yuan) Tsai; in his youth he was a champion competitor and applauded as a coach of champions. I only say this to demonstrate what he was always saying, "There are philosophers of Qi and there are farmers of Qi, I am the latter." For GM Tsai as a competitor his Qi skills had to be real, not imagined. I apprenticed with GM Tsai as a man in his 60's. The internal cultivation skills he taught me come from his training with a true Shaolin Warrior, who fought the Japanese in Taiwan. Everything he teaches is all a part of his martial art training. I do not study external Kung Fu, but the internal skills I practice are for the cultivation of a person whether they practice external martial art or not.

I believe I will develop a reputation on this forum as being long winded, so walk with me just a while longer. To answer your question, perhaps it is intention and application of the technique. I also studied some Tai chi. You know that sweet beginning movement in many forms where you raise the two hands and then sink down again? One Tai Chi teacher explained that the martial aspect of that movement was raising the palms to claw out the opponents eyes. I prefer to raise earth energy up and sink into the ground, but who knows. My training contained a dynamic component to build strong qi as both a defense and for penetration, but I interpret the skills in ways that relate to my life and needs.

I have seen Tai chi as a martial art competition and as a way for elderly people to soften and balance. 

How about you, why do you practice?

 

 

This will explain my own path a little more clear then me re-posting  here. 

 

 

Quote

In my own journey to emptiness I have had many teachers/guides along the way.

As a young teenager growing up in San Francisco during the troubled times of the day.  Looking for a refuge,  Chinese Martial Arts opened its door and invited me in….little did I know I could never leave.

 

https://journeytoemptiness.com/2017/05/10/beginnings/

 

https://journeytoemptiness.com/2017/01/13/master-zhang-yongliang/

Edited by windwalker
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Hi Leah,

 

I recall you as the sweet lady I had communicated with recently.

How have you been?

How am I? Good - still very sweet.

 

It is the first time I am stringing onto your thread. Had seen Qibody before but I am not a busybody. So I gave it a miss till now.

 

I like your postings immediately. Love at first sight (I told you I am sweet) :wub:!!!

 

Why? I sense humility, transparency, responsibility ,,,  (for an overseas Chinese I have a very sharp nose). My bloodline has no occidental genes yet.

 

You will be an asset to TDB. You think so too Marblehead?

 

- LimA

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Limahong said:

You will be an asset to TDB. You think so too Marblehead?

 

- LimA

 

Yes, I think so too.

 

(Yes, I do read all these posts.)

 

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hi LimA,

do you think it is accidental that you have no occidental. I believe if you did you would be too irresistible. Sweet as yinny syrup.

You and marble head make me laugh so heartily. Are you two old friends? I have been busy today trying to figure out a forum on my website for my students and remote students to ask questions. Truth is i wish I didn't have to be so technologically wrapped up in business, but a QiBody has gotta make a living. I do love teaching. It feels like playing! 

May I ask what you fill your day with sweet man?

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Hi Qibody,

 

I have accepted the occidental component of my life, not accidentally but karmically.

 

By embracing Taoism, 'oriental-occidental' is now an union within me; no longer a struggle.

 

Sweet as yinny syrup but hostile as yangy battle?

 

Teaching is noble, but please do so truthfully.

 

Marblehead and I knew each other from previous lives. 

 

I am a researcher.

 

- LimA

 

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