Gyon

Sitting meditation not comfortable

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Posted (edited)

From my experience with both meditation and kundalini yoga.... all that is important is that your spine is straight. This is an issue for me as I have a curved spine from 20 years of computing at a chair slouched.

 

In KY she told us it will hurt but to get through the pain...but this coming from a lightweight woman who did 5 years of hatha yoga before K yoga and sometimes gets us to get up from full lotus to on feet in one movement ie jumping from lotus to on feet in one go... I don't even attempt that... but the fact she can do that as well as full splits tells me she doesn't understand what posture pain is.

 

Many people who have done 7+ day silent meditations tell me it REALLY hurts but 4-5 days in the pain leaves.

 

Make sure you take enough magnesium and zinc. Even trying full lotus will use muscles you never used before.

 

My first K session was 5 hours long and the day later I couldn't get out of bed, everywhere ached, but good ache, when you ache you know you have progressed...

So unlike most of her students in far more pain...she preceded her Kundalini yoga with enough years of Hatha yoga to gain the flexibility to jump right out of full lotus up onto her feet.  In short, she didn't start "qigong" until she was able to pass the physical litmus test of "hands free" full lotus first.

 

So, why she doesn't also advise this basic sequence to her students is puzzling...  Maybe because then she'd have no students left? :lol:

Edited by gendao

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Posted (edited)

I sit for 40 minutes in the full lotus in the morning, and after many years I'm happy to report that it's mostly without pain or significant numbness.  Hoping to find myself with zero numbness all the time soon.

 

In one of his books, Red Pine visits a monastery where they sat 30 minutes, then 45, then 60, then 90, in alternation.  I've read that in many Rinzai monasteries, they sit 25, whereas in Soto it's usually 40.  I'm not sure how accurate that is.  At Antaiji, they apparently do a 5-day sesshin once a  month, sitting 50 minutes and walking 10 for 14 periods a day (at least, Shohaku Okumura reports that was the routine of his teacher Uchiyama).

 

I think there was a student of Chunyi Lin on this forum who reported that he advised anyone with the thought of becoming a healer to sit 2 hours in the full lotus every day.

 

All of this is to say that you might want to experiment with how long you are sitting.

 

In my experience, the lotus is about the pivots of the sacrum, and the way that the weight of the body induces involuntary activity in response to the stretch of ligaments and fascia.  You probably know what Gautama the Buddha was talking about, when he spoke of the cessation of ease apart from equanimity--that would be the moment when the ligaments and fascia alternate in stretch through involuntary activity, continuously.   That kind of  stretch/activity aligns the vertebrae to allow feeling to the surface of the skin, allows the "nondirection of mind" and the cessation of happiness apart from equanimity.

 

Fundamentally, the movement of breath acts, and the sense of self-location rests with equalibrioception, proprioception, graviception, and oculoception.

Edited by Mark Foote
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Does it make sense that if a person wants to have good posture than the abdominal muscles need to be engaged constantly? I found out that if I don't 'tense' my abs and midriff my back muscles are overloaded and pretty soon I get pain and begin to bend.

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On 2/23/2017 at 2:18 AM, Gyon said:

I am really trying hard to be comfortable during sitting meditation.

 

This is such a good thread! I think I'll resurrect it! :)

 

Unless you are a skinny string-bean, extended cross legged sitting is not easy. As others have stated, those of us from western countries never learned to sit on the floor growing up so it's somewhat unnatural. I have a sturdy cushion (actually a yoga bolster). It helps a lot - keeps my butt higher than my feet which does wonders. I also set a timer on my phone so I'm not tempted to check the clock. When it rings, it rings. Until then, I sit.

 

Regarding the rest, I've learned that there's nothing else I need to do and there's nowhere else I need to be. Keep the priorities straight.

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