taoguy

What is your practice?

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I currently do Anapanasati and white skeleton visualization as taught by Nan Huai Jin. I used to do Anapanasati using Ajahn Brahm's instructions, but found NHJ's interpretation much easier to understand in terms of the not-self principle.

 

Just wondering how you guys practice? Any results? Have you reached dhyana or samadhi? 

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My practice is dzogchen in the Bon lineage of Zhang Zhung Nyen Gyu. My secondary practice is Dream Yoga from the Ma Gyu Tantra. I have not found this forum to be a comfortable or supportive place to discuss specific results. I can say that the practices have profoundly impacted my life, work, and relationships in beautiful ways so I would say, yes - good results. 

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My practice is dzogchen in the Bon lineage of Zhang Zhung Nyen Gyu. My secondary practice is Dream Yoga from the Ma Gyu Tantra. I have not found this forum to be a comfortable or supportive place to discuss specific results. I can say that the practices have profoundly impacted my life, work, and relationships in beautiful ways so I would say, yes - good results. 

 

I have noticed a deep change in you toward the serene and non-attached in a few years time.

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Anapanasati (Alan Wallace - though he comes from a visuddhimagga-jhana perspective while I find the sutta-jhana perspective more reasonable) and Mahasi-style vipashyana, mainly. A bit of qigong (Damo Mitchell) occasionally.

 

Not yet to jhana or awakening, but getting there. :P In the last few years my memory, understanding, concentration, emotional maturity, goodwill and stuff have got so much better. Though some of that is down to just growing up.

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Shaolin Nei Jin Yi Zhi Chan, and I would quote the last part of Steves text if I wasn't non-compatible with the quoting method.

;-)

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balinese usada meditation, healing practice taught to me with a wide range of applications-results. basically a body parts thing. in buddhist context it gets into vipassana territory (if you're going at it enough) and refines direct perception by concentrating on the different elements in body. grounding and increasing equanimity are the main benefits. my personal results have been reversing chronic ailments (skin condition, digestive issues) and clear light/awakened dreams that flicked a switch and brought various perceptions/abilities online. reality feels very, very different nowadays :ph34r:

 

i plan to do more single pointed concentration in the future, but feel there's a long way to go with this healing practice and getting my life in order before that makes sense.

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Mindfulness is key.

 

I prefer never to have the same practice twice.  One only gets this one moment to make the liberating realizations.  

 

I don't follow the path of another, because it can not also be my path. 

 

From my experience, the right way to meditate is whatever way a session leads to realization, everything else is exercise/gesture. 

 

Before meditation, forgive yourself, forgive all burdens you carry, and forgive all yet unarisen potential of future burdens. Recognize the impermanence of all 'things' (including body) and why attachment to them is pointless suffering. Let your thoughts transcend that which will crumble to dust.  Realize if meditation contains words it has not escaped human constructs and will not escape pointless loops of construct delusion arrangements.  Conclude judgement, conclude preference, conclude fearing detachment.  

 

With a clear mind, fearlessly embrace moving deeper into mind, not judging the rate the depth comes, not pushing for deeper, just letting it settle naturally as it clears.  Experience the natural state, absorbing the realization it offers. 

 

Post-meditation realization integration, and living a mindful lifestyle that is not in conflict with your ethics enables bringing the bliss into every moment of Now. 

 

With unlimited Love,

-Bud

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In terms of spiritual cultivation, aside from Qigong/Neigong etc., my practice presently follows the Mahayana school of Buddhism, reciting the Buddha's Dharanis, studying and reading the Sutras and practising maintaining the mantra Om Mani Padme Hum constantly in mind. The objective is to practice Om Mani Padme Hum samadhi. This is not the path I thought I would follow, and it is far from easy, but I am persevering and doing my best to be faithful to the practice. My teacher has a very low opinion of energetic practices, as he says did Lord Buddha. I am not so sure about that, as the Patriarch Bodhidharma surely did not pull the practices he brought to the Shaolin temple out of thin air - they must have been based upon an existent practice. What do you think about this? I mean that Bodhidharma must have been doing something similar to what he taught the Shaolin monks. Or did he arrive at the entire system only through his years spent in meditation in his cave?

 

David

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DSCB57 if you enter arupa jhana and formless states you would be have very low opinion on 99% practices and how people blindly follow them without understanding principles of self cultivation.

 

Also some monks used various energy practice like quasi-qigong or yoga for healing and support for cultivation basic mindfulness.

Edited by SeekerOfHealing

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My practice is dzogchen in the Bon lineage of Zhang Zhung Nyen Gyu. My secondary practice is Dream Yoga from the Ma Gyu Tantra. I have not found this forum to be a comfortable or supportive place to discuss specific results. I can say that the practices have profoundly impacted my life, work, and relationships in beautiful ways so I would say, yes - good results. 

 

I've recently added sleep yoga practices - connecting with the clear light during sleep.

More challenging than dream practices but the results are also more direct and profound.

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I've recently added sleep yoga practices - connecting with the clear light during sleep.

More challenging than dream practices but the results are also more direct and profound.

may your practice be free of obstacles

 

may you swiftly gain the fruit of practice 

 

:wub:

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may your practice be free of obstacles

 

may you swiftly gain the fruit of practice 

 

:wub:

 

I really appreciate your support!

 

:wub:

_/\_

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I practice Anapanasati, as well as shaolin martial arts and qigong. However the most central practice to me is the nembutsu. I found the Pure Land school recently and, as a married man with a family, it offers the greatest reassurance that even if (owing to my circumstances) I'm not able to complete cultivation in this lifetime, I am still able to complete it in the next.

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