Recommended Posts

I've been practicing Gary Clyman's Tidal Wave Chi Kung for a while. I like it but I'd like to add a more medically based practice. I am pondering either getting the first two Flying Phoenix DVDs or Ted Mancuso's "Blossoms in the Spring". I like that the "Blossoms in the Spring" practice appears to be fairly short and self contained but I haven't heard too much about it. People seem very happy with Flying Phoenix but it is much larger and could turn into a much longer practice.

 

Any thoughts on either of these as a complement to Clyman's system?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FP doesn't have to be a large overwhelming thing, they say to do each DVD in the order given at least once but after that you can take, for example, just bending the bows and do that for an hour.

 

If your other practice is a lot of standing and movement you might want to check out the FP seated meds or SYG . I sometimes do a lot of other meditation in full lotus so at those times I tend to crave and prefer the body movement of the taichi style moving meditations for my qigong.

 

On the other hand when I was doing more frequent and strenuous cardio and strength training, I felt much more like doing a seated or static session than getting my moving horse stance on.

Edited by Raynevin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello dorfmeister,

 

Your description of the Blossoms form is accurate. It is short and self-contained. Each round takes less than five minutes to complete, and it is structured so that one round can flow right into the next. I usually do about four rounds when I practice it. It is a seated form and quite peaceful and relaxing. I learned it from Caldwell and Mancuso's book and DVD, which are very good in my opinion. The sensation that I get from practicing it is similar to Tai Chi Ruler, which is that it facilitates distribution of qi through the meridians. I tend to do both of those near the end of my practice when I do them. I haven't done Clyman's system, but if it involves concentrating qi in the LDT, as I think it does, this might be a nice piece to do after that. I haven't done FP, but I know that it has many more components and special breath patterns.

Edited by Dainin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For comparison, single seated meditation from DVD no. 2 in Flying Phoenix takes way over 5 minutes to complete (7 rounds), maybe 15-20.

FP being large system, it is also somewhat loose - exercises being independent, you don't have to learn everything especially if you only adopt it as supplementary practice.

Edited by Leif
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want a medical Qigong that you can do right after the Clyman's DPR - you should try Spring Forest Qigong. For the last couple months I've been doing both programs and they seem to compliment each other nicely. On some days I will do Clyman's DPR as soon as I wake up and then follow up with a 2 hour SFQ session. The energies don't tangle up or anything and I've been getting the best of both worlds.....The super motivated laser focus of Clyman's program - and all the health benefits of SFQ.

 

Chunyi Lin actually did something similar to what Clyman did when he created SFQ....He took at all the movements that weren't needed and and just kept the important stuff. I was reading a thread on this forum once about what medical qigong system to start out with.....A poster named Hundun who I think is somewhat of a Qigong master recomended SFQ and said "If someone said SFQ has no juice they are smoking crack."

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have done Spring Forest for 8 years and strong chi is felt soon, but for healing health issues the best I have tried is the very simple and quick 20 minute Pangu Mystical Qigong. It does what it claims. For instance, I had a serious respiratory virus last year and it was not getting better until I was told to do Pangu Mystical Qigong for hours. I did so and the symptoms were 90% improved over night, just as Pangu headquarters had told me it would be.

I have really enjoyed doing Flying Phoenix Chi Kung for the past three years and the only drawback to it is that it has 6-7 dvds and as stated in the above posts, just one meditation can take 20 or more minutes to do since you feel stronger chi flow the slower you go. So you really do need to have a lot of spare time to do that system correctly. Therefore I prefer the shorter but powerful styles which can be done in 30 minutes or less such as Pangu, and all of the dvds of Grand Master Kellen Chia of Australia at taichisociety.com. His latest release and most powerful of the series is The Immortal Ten. Simple to learn and strong chi flow can be felt. I am in my second week of learning Blossoms in the Spring and that is another one that takes very little time to do and is easy to learn. Another brief one is Sunn Yee Gong Complete level One which comes from the same grand master who taught Flying Phoenix. The short moving form on that one feels really good to do. Qinway Qigong is also powerful and does not take long to do. My so far brief exposure to doing just the first of the 3 sections of Blossoms in the Spring is that it does indeed produce a state of relaxation that to me resembles the feeling of relaxation that comes from doing a deep meditation practice and you enter that state quickly with Blossoms. Yi Gong is a very simple sitting posture qigong which can be 20-45 minutes and it produces a golden liquid like energy that fills up the energy body per my medical clairvoyant. It is one of the powerful methods he has ever tested. My lifestyle requires only short and simple chi kung methods.

Edited by tao stillness
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Tao stillness, 

I was interested in learning Pangu Mystical Qigong., as I have a slight health problem at the moment.  Could you please tell me if I can learn this qigong by just following the book "Pangu Mystical Qigong" or do I need some sort of initiation first in order for it to work? In other words, could I just learn this simple qigong on my own? Thanks 

Edited by hierundjetzt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I learned it from Michael Winn, Healing Tao.  Note he's not with the formal/official group that teaches it.  I find his take simple, easy, fast with good energetics. 

 

Here's a video of his interpretation -

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, thelerner said:

 

Addon: another possible blasphemy is my coffee Pangu routine.  I have a Haribo mechanical coffee grinder.  Each morning I load it up w/ 1.5 tablespoons of coffee beans.  Then holding it from the bottom, I crank 26 turns, top and bottom hands moving circularly- 26 left, 26 right, 26 middle, repeat til coffee ground.  Usually done in a slight horse stance. 

 

My wife and kids have asked me what I'm doing and usually before I can launch into a full explanation of vortexes, meridians and the number 26.. they go 'oh, never mind'. 

 

Edited by thelerner
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites