arthur

Taichi Styes complementary to NeiKung

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Not interested in martial, but is there a specific taichi style that is meant to be more complementary to neikung practices than other?

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i am not sure, but i think yang tai chi is said to be useful as qigong/nei kung complement

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Wu style got more internal movements, more exact, so is better for beginners in Neigung.   It was highly recommended by a western Neigung master who I forgot his name.   Or Xing Yi is also a good choice, as they are most renowned in standing stance, which is already Neigung.

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Depends on who's teaching you.  For me there's a lot of crossover in principles between Yang Style (Huang Shyan Sheng line) and Nei Gong for a while.  I know Bruce Frantzis teaches Wu style alongside his Qigong.

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On 2/6/2021 at 12:35 AM, arthur said:

Not interested in martial, but is there a specific taichi style that is meant to be more complementary to neikung practices than other?

 

IMO all taijiquan styles are very complementary with neigong practice.

The internal aspects seem to be emphasized most in Chen and Wu styles but are present in all styles.

Some of the emphasis is dependent on specific lineage and individual teachers.

Of all the internal Chinese martial arts, I would say that neigong is emphasized most in Yiquan.

 

 

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11 hours ago, dwai said:

Temple style Tai chi. 

 

Thanks. Who are the sifus teaching temple style specifically?

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2 minutes ago, arthur said:

So when it comes to temple style, does it also belong to a specific chen, wu, yang etc...?

No, it is not a family style. It is its own style. In terms of form, it looks similar to yang style, but is practiced and taught differently. 
 

Master Waysun Liao, who came to the US from Taiwan, learned the art from a daoist monk in Taiwan. He said he was taught the way monks learned it in Daoist temples, and so called what he teaches, Temple style. 

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22 hours ago, Wilhelm said:

Depends on who's teaching you.  For me there's a lot of crossover in principles between Yang Style (Huang Shyan Sheng line) and Nei Gong for a while.  I know Bruce Frantzis teaches Wu style alongside his Qigong.

 

Yeah I'd say the HSS version of the 37 yang form is the one I see most Western neigong teachers practicing (Damo Mitchell and Adam Mizner).

 

Its very soft, emphasises sinking, internal listening and looseness - all of which are qualities you want to learn in the early stages of neigong. There's also a lot of standing work at the beginning, which is part of the foundation for neigong.

Edited by Vajra Fist

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@arthur  I answered Wu style is better, on a technical comparison.  But if your question is which style you are going to follow, then my answer would be the most popular one in your area, provided it is not too substandard.   Taichi cannot be learned from online alone, so students need personal instruction from teacher, and other students to practise and exchange.   It is easier to get materials (most of the things may not be on the internet) and to avoid the teacher going out of business, retire etc which would could force you to start another style or teacher from scratch.

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9 hours ago, Master Logray said:

@arthur  I answered Wu style is better, on a technical comparison.  But if your question is which style you are going to follow, then my answer would be the most popular one in your area, provided it is not too substandard.   Taichi cannot be learned from online alone, so students need personal instruction from teacher, and other students to practise and exchange.   It is easier to get materials (most of the things may not be on the internet) and to avoid the teacher going out of business, retire etc which would could force you to start another style or teacher from scratch.

I understand the need to seek a teacher. That's my intention. For now, i'm just trying to soak as much theory as i can. so when it comes to application. i will know what i am doing instead of blindly following movements. Thanks.

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15 minutes ago, arthur said:

I understand the need to seek a teacher. That's my intention. For now, i'm just trying to soak as much theory as i can. so when it comes to application. i will know what i am doing instead of blindly following movements. Thanks.

 

I don't mean to be contrary but cautionary.

"Knowing" what you are doing through theory is secondary in taijiquan.

Once you have the physical experience, you can begin to make sense of the theory.

Feeling the posture, connecting awareness and intention with the movement, listening to the opponent through touch - these are what application is rooted in. Studying theory does very little to help development of taiji skill, IMO. It's far more likely to be an obstacle in my experience. Whenever I asked my teacher about resources for reading, his answer was the same - don't waste your time with theory! Practice!!!

 

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2 hours ago, arthur said:

For now, i'm just trying to soak as much theory as i can. so when it comes to application. i will know what i am doing instead of blindly following movements. Thanks.

Here’s the theory —

 

  1. develop sung (release)
  2. develop ting (listening)

Without these you can’t do any real

 neigong. To develop these, you need to practice and learn from a good teacher. 
 

How will you know if you have sung? How will you know if you have ting? 


When you touch hands with another person. You have to feel sung and experience ting in someone else to know it. . 

 

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