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Fa Xin

Tulsi (Holy Basil)

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There's a reason why its called "the mother of herbs", and why it's worshipped in the Hindu/Indian culture.  Many people consider the plant to be an Earthly manifestation of Lakshmi. It is rumored to be able to help with just about any ailment, and regulate many body functions and processes.

 

I discovered it quite by accident, one year I was very sick with the flu and could not sleep because of the fever I was running.  Someone gave me a tea bag of Tulsi to try, and surprisingly it almost stopped by chills/fever for about 3-5 hours.

 

Since then, I've been using it often, and find it is a great beneficial herb.  I use it mainly in tea form, since I am a big drinker of tea.  I believe they also sell it in capsules.

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Tulsi is held in very high regard by Hindus.  I like the fragrance of the fresh Tulsi leaves, it can calm the mind and even put the mind in a divine vibration in my opinion.  In India it is common for Hindus to grow Tulsi plants at home.  The plant itself is considered auspicious and also to spread positive vibration or energy.  Tulsi leaves are used in the pooja ceremonies for the worship of Vishnu.  It is also a very valuable medicinal herb as you point out.  Tulsi water is offered to the deity Vishnu in Hindu temples and also served to devotees as blessings from the deity to consume.  I also like the taste of the fresh Tulsi leaves.  I guess consuming a few leaves everyday could be greatly beneficial to general health.

 

It is possible to grow Tulsi plant in America in certain places.  It cannot survive the harsh winter like in the east coast or Midwest.  Places like Florida may be the best.  We grow them in pots in Texas and keep indoors in the winter where it can get some sunlight.

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Thanks siva. That is really cool. Maybe I can grow them in the summer time here. I would love to get my hands on some fresh leaves! I’ll look into that 👍

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We grow it here in western NC with no problems - it actually seems to grow itself and spreads easily. A favorite of bees, too.

 

Nice always having fresh and dried tulsi around... :)

 

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Just now, Fa Xin said:

Thanks siva. That is really cool. Maybe I can grow them in the summer time here. I would love to get my hands on some fresh leaves! I’ll look into that 👍

 

You are welcome!  You may be able to get Tulsi plants in summer from the local Hindu temples.  Just call and ask them if it is possible to get a plant in the spring or summer.  That is how we get the Tulsi plant in Texas.  They generally give away or sell small Tulsi plants in cups (with some clay/sand) (for $5) in the temples here.

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14 minutes ago, s1va said:

In India it is common for Hindus to grow Tulsi plants at home.

 

Once I worked with an Indian who suggested that people with odd health problems should grow their own tulsi plant...beyond merely having it as tea, or whatever else.

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4 minutes ago, Cybele said:

We grow it here in western NC with no problems - it actually seems to grow itself and spreads easily. A favorite of bees, too.

 

Nice always having fresh and dried tulsi around... :)

 

 

How long do they take to grow?

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I have some Tulsi wood neck beads given to me by a Krsna devotee friend of mine. Apparently wearing them is very auspicious. I haven't done so yet. Maybe I should.

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4 minutes ago, Fa Xin said:

 

How long do they take to grow?

 

Tulsi is the type of plant that spreads easily as Cybelle pointed out.  So, generally it is better to get a small plant from someone who has one already.  I have never grown from a seed and not sure how long would that take.  If someone did perhaps they can answer.

 

From a tiny plant (about 2 to 3 inches with few leaves) in a small water cup sized pot, it can grow  in one season into a larger plant (up to a feet) needing a big pot.

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5 minutes ago, lifeforce said:

I have some Tulsi wood neck beads given to me by a Krsna devotee friend of mine. Apparently wearing them is very auspicious. I haven't done so yet. Maybe I should.

 

I think I actually have a pair too. Very light weight wood yes? Almost feels like cork. 

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4 minutes ago, Fa Xin said:

 

I think I actually have a pair too. Very light weight wood yes? Almost feels like cork. 

Yes. They have a lovely fragrance.

He also gave me a Tulsi wood mala which also smells divine.

I might see if I can get a plant or even grow one from scratch.

I quite like the idea of the tea.

Edited by lifeforce
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25 minutes ago, lifeforce said:

I have some Tulsi wood neck beads given to me by a Krsna devotee friend of mine. Apparently wearing them is very auspicious. I haven't done so yet. Maybe I should.

 

Doing japa (repetition of deity mantras) with either Tulsi or Rudhaksha beads is considered beneficial and superior to any other types of beads.  It has something to with their texture, feel and the vibrational energy from these beads.  The finger tips have lot of sensitive nerves.  To feel the texture of these beads by holding them with the finger tips and moving them like in japa is attributed somehow to absorb positive vibrations and to balance the energy.

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3 hours ago, LightShadowDao18 said:

Love tulsi. Actually drinking a cup of Rama tulsi right now. Wonderful adaptagen that is often overlooked. 

 

That’s awesome. Where do you get yours? 

 

ive just been drinking the store bought kind (organic India brand), which have a mixture of the 3 leafs and flavoring options too. 

 

Not quite as mystical as growing it or getting it from a temple...😊

 

ill have to look into the different kinds of leaves ... the one I have says Krishna, Vana and Rama. Wonder what the difference is

Edited by Fa Xin

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22 hours ago, Fa Xin said:

How long do they take to grow?

 

We start them from seed, around 60 days to flower. You could probably grow it indoors in a sunny window.

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Posted (edited)

I grew this stuff about 12 years ago in my standing backyard garden. I had bought about 9 different kinds of basil to try (all from seed by the way. Started indoors like peppers/tomatoes. Grew just fine -- much like all the other basils -- in zone 6 ozarks). Each year, the smell of a few basils and other herbs in the garden was nice. But that year, the smell was just out of this world. It honestly felt like you were being 'fed' on some level and getting healthier by the sniff just by walking through the garden. I've always assumed it was simply a greater variety of basil types that year that had that effect. Maybe it was the Tulsi. :-) 

 

Some of the larger seed organizations (like Seed Savers) should have it. Maybe not in the public-commercial catalog (not sure) but their membership offerings are really huge. I remember the first time I got their small-print thick-book catalog in the 90s, realizing there were probably 150 or so different kinds of peas (peas!) alone, not to mention everything else, including tons of fruiting plants I never heard of in my life -- really mind boggling!

 

This spring I am starting a whole back room of aeroponic cloning and hydroponic gardening, mostly for summer veggies I can have indoors year round, but I figure I'll also grow a few culinary herbs and pretty flowers. Maybe I will grow some Tulsi. I cannot recall the specific taste of the stuff. Could you make pesto out of it like you do other basils?

 

RC

Edited by redcairo
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On 21.01.2019 at 11:07 PM, Fa Xin said:

There's a reason why its called "the mother of herbs", and why it's worshipped in the Hindu/Indian culture.  Many people consider the plant to be an Earthly manifestation of Lakshmi. It is rumored to be able to help with just about any ailment, and regulate many body functions and processes.


Thanks for the topic, Fa Xin !
I looked at the healing properties of basil, and was surprised. The list of beneficial effects on the body is really impressive. I will definitely explore basil on myself!
By the way, it was noted that it has such a strong effect that doctors do not recommend using basil in large doses.

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4 hours ago, Pavel Karavaev said:


Thanks for the topic, Fa Xin !
I looked at the healing properties of basil, and was surprised. The list of beneficial effects on the body is really impressive. I will definitely explore basil on myself!
By the way, it was noted that it has such a strong effect that doctors do not recommend using basil in large doses.

 

Good reminder about not to overuse it. Like any plant medicine, it’s good to respect the healing properties and not overdo it. 

 

Also, I’m sure you’re aware but “holy basil” and regular basil are different species of plants. Just so people reading this in the future don’t get it confused. 

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Posted (edited)
On 16.05.2019 at 3:53 PM, Fa Xin said:

 

Good reminder about not to overuse it. Like any plant medicine, it’s good to respect the healing properties and not overdo it. 

 

Also, I’m sure you’re aware but “holy basil” and regular basil are different species of plants. Just so people reading this in the future don’t get it confused. 


Thanks for this comment. It is an important note.
Interesting how it retains its healing properties when grown in the garden or at home.

And yes, sure, it will be correct to call this plant Holy Basil, not just Basil.

Edited by Pavel Karavaev
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