Bindi

The place of emotions in spirituality

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Damo Mitchell on feelings, emotions and mood. Key takeaways for me are that in his opinion emotional work is required before starting any meditation practice, and that meditation is not emotional work. Getting this right is the difference between actualising emotional detachment which entails suppressing emotions, and learning to allow emotions to flow but not attaching to them. 
 

 

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Bindi, thank you! 

 

What a fabulous talk - getting rid of the hold that emotions have over you.  I too am of the belief that developing and uncovering one's inner self, one's motivations, one's memories that started the feeling to begin with.  His solution is so perfect, as what it's requiring is nothing more than to bring up that original memory and go through the physical feeling.  For the longest time I didn't know that.  It was always something vague, feelings.  But he's talking about that butterfly in your stomach, that tightening of the throat, the heat of embarrassment on your face - those actual physical responses.  Little responses.  He emphasizes the necessity of reliving the occurrence, remembering it fully - and then do nothing more than take note of the physical sensations, as many times as necessary to diminish the physical feelings, which are those places that restrict the free flow of energy.

 

Many, after purging themselves of these restrictions and doing what is necessary to alleviate old guilts and angers (usually involving seeing our own part in the transaction in a new way) sometimes apologies are necessary to straighten out the wrinkles.  You can actually feel the warm smoothing of a previously clenched physical and psychical areas.  The body and the mind are one.  The load gets lighter and lighter as the layers are uncovered until, one day, you begin to see who you really are.

 

These ideas, these inner journeys are what the alcoholic or addict must take in order to get and remain sober.  If they are 'fearless and thorough', as they say, as to finding inner faults and shortcomings, and do what it takes to reverse the blockage.  Work the steps.  The steps are the very dynamic that Damo speaks of so eloquently.  I've never heard anyone link the two dynamics together as well as he did.  It makes me know that he has either gone through recovery himself, or he is very close to someone who has.

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Another perennial topic. An enormous amount of effort, dedication and discipline is required to tackle those 'emotions' which are nothing more than blockages you have carried on (will carry on if not resolved) from lifetime to lifetime.

 

Buddhism calls this Vipassana; that is, seeing things as they truly are.

 

*Gurdjieff's method is the same minus the religious content..

 

It's basically the essence of INNER WORK.

 

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