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Lataif

How Common Is QiQong in ChInese Expat Communities (?)

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Posted (edited)

Please:

 

(1) Anyone feel confident to guesstimate how common QiGong is in Chinese expatriate communites (?)

 

(2) I suppose it differs by country and social class.

 

(3)  But say in America, if you're talking to a person of Chinese descent -- what are chances that they do

some QiGong in the family (?)

 

(4) 10% (?)  33% (?)  50% (?) 

 

Thanks. 

Edited by Lataif

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Posted (edited)

Pretty low—a lot of Asian American and Chinese -Filipino kids I know are actively trying to be unlike their heritage culture. Qigong to them is superstitious.

Edited by Earl Grey
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Posted (edited)

 

For Chinese, if they are second generation immigration and they are in the age of 20s -50s, it would be less than 3%? 

When they get older they might start to learn Qigong or Taichi.

For third generation immigration, it may be less than 1%.

 

Edited by Shubin

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Posted (edited)

Maybe I´m lucky to have run into one of the few.  I was walking through San Francisco and saw a middle-aged Asian woman (I thought Chinese though I might have been mistaken) shaking and slapping her arms out on her stoop.  Her movements looked very much like qigong to me so I asked "Doing your morning qigong?" and earned a big smile.

Edited by liminal_luke
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I’m a third generation Chinese immigrant. Both parents are aware of QiGong but only recently practiced, it’s only been 19 years after suppression of practice of Chinese culture are lifted, but we’re seeing growth here and there, both for old and younger generation.

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I often interact with Chinese-Americans seeking healthcare. They very rarely have any interest or confidence in traditional methods a be it Qigong, acupuncture, tuina, taiji..., IME. They have far more confidence in what they consider to be ‘science-based’ treatment - their words, not mine. Indian and Japanese patients tend to be more confident in traditional methods and combine them with Western treatment. I suspect it is a combination of the purging of the cultural revolution and the tendency for descendants of immigrants to abandon the “old” ways. The nightmarish complexity and dysfunction of the US system is likely to encourage a return to the “old” ways eventually, I suspect. To some degree, I think it is already happening.

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