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[DDJ Meaning] Chapter 69

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David Hinton 2002
69

There was once a saying among those who wielded armies:
I'd much rather be a guest than a host,
much rather retreat a foot than advance an inch.
This is called marching without marching,
rolling up sleeves without baring arms,
raising swords without brandishing weapons,
entering battle without facing an enemy.
There's no greater calamity than dishonoring an enemy.
Dishonor an enemy and you'll lose those treasures of mine.
When armies face one another in battle,
it's always the tender-hearted one that prevails.

 

 

Dwight Goddard 1919
69
A military expert has said: I do not dare put myself forward as a host, but always act as a guest. I hesitate to advance an inch, but am willing to withdraw a foot.

This is advancing by not advancing, it is winning without arms, it is charging without hostility, it is seizing without weapons. There is no mistake greater than making light of an enemy. By making light of an enemy we lose our treasure.

Therefore when well-matched armies come to conflict, the one who is conscious of his weakness conquers.

 

 

Bradford Hatcher 2005
69

Military strategists have a saying:
“I will not dare to act as host,
But rather, act as guest,
Will not presume to advance an inch,
But rather, retreat a foot”
This may be called “to move without movement,
To roll up sleeves without baring arms,
To depose without a fight
To capture without force”
There is no danger greater than underestimating a foe
Underestimate a foe will risk losing what we value
And so when opposing forces meet each other
The one sympathetic will truly succeed


 

Wing-Tsit Chan 1963
69 

The strategists say: "I dare not take the offensive but I take the defensive; I dare not advance an inch but I retreat a foot." 
This means: To march without formation, To stretch one's arm without showing it, To confront enemies without seeming to meet them, To hold weapons without seeming to have them. 
There is no greater disaster than to make light the enemy. 
Therefore when armies are mobilized and issues joined, The man who is sorry over the fact will win. 

 

 

Gu Zhengku 1993
69

A strategist says:
I dare not launch an attack but strengthen defense capabilities;
I dare not advance an inch but retreat a foot instead.
This means to deploy battle array by showing no battle array;
To wield one's arm to attack by showing no arm to lift;
To face the enemy by showing no enemy to attack;
To hold weapons by showing no weapons to hold.
No disaster is greater than underestimating the enemy.
Underestimating the enemy nearly cost me my treasure (i. e. three treasured weapons, see 67).
That is why the sorrow-laden side wins
When two armies are at war.

 


Ch'u Ta-Kao 1904
69

An ancient tactician has said:
'I dare not act as a host, but would rather act as a guest;
I dare not advance an inch, but would rather retreat a foot.'
This implies that he does not marshal the ranks as if there were no ranks;
He does not roll up his sleeves as if he had no arms;
He does not seize as if he had no weapons;
He does not fight as if there were no enemies.
No calamity is greater than under-estimating the enemy.
To under-estimate the enemy is to be on the point of losing our treasure (love).
Threfore when opposing armies meet in the field the ruthful will win.

 

 

Flowing Hands 1987
69
The warrior who is a man of Dao,
conducts his art by yielding and uses compassion first.
If this doesn't work, he then takes out his sword.
He would rather retreat without combat than advance and attack.
For when the baffle is underway, one or the other will lose their life.
This is why the man of Dao would sooner give in and
yield to aggression and violence.
Not that he is afraid, but in his heart he cherishes life too much,
and he would find it hard to take the life of another.
When the man of Dao engages in battle,
he looks upon himself as the underdog, and so he will win.
By not underestimating the enemy, he does not lose what he values,
namely the Dao.

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Rather intense chapter... after many re-reads, I would recommend this:

 

Read Hinton 5 times with a pause to let it sink in.

 

Then read Flowing Hands 5 times with a pause to let it sink in. 

 

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Sure, another association with The Art Of War but also an association to the Three Treasures.

 

Strong-headed aggressiveness is most times self-defeating.

 

Better to take a defensive position, build on it and defend it well.

 

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This is another one that has many levels to it.  I will focus my comments on the more energy level. Also, I think the Feng version is actually the most clear for this chapter...

 

SIXTY-NINE

There is a saying among soldiers: “I dare not make the first move but would rather play the guest;

I dare not advance an inch but would rather withdraw a foot.”

This is called marching without appearing to move,

Rolling up your sleeves without showing your arm,

Capturing the enemy without attacking,

Being armed without weapons.

There is no greater catastrophe than underestimating the enemy.

By underestimating the enemy,

I risk losing what I value.

Therefore when the battle is joined,

The underdog will win.

 

In any energy battle (or fighting with a negative being), this chapter very well explains the best approach. If fighting such a battle, it is sort of like mind to/against mind. So attacking another is like going from your mind space into another mind space.  While egotistical “evil guru” types think they can over power that way, it is a huge mistake.  As one goes into another “local” mindspace, you increasingly become more subject to the rules and nature of that mind space.  Also, the deeper into that mind space, the more powerful (and rigid). Hence, the best approach is as described...

 

There is a saying among soldiers: “I dare not make the first move but would rather play the guest;

I dare not advance an inch but would rather withdraw a foot.”

This is called marching without appearing to move,

Rolling up your sleeves without showing your arm,

Capturing the enemy without attacking,

Being armed without weapons.

 

Once on your own “turf” it is all much easier as your mind becomes the natural “translation” and mapping of the energy attack. As long as you dont get caught up in it, that mental badass demon thing is now just some energy wash/push. For the next part,  Underestimating the enemy could also be described is you going arrogant and over confident (or more ego based), and in potentially leaving your base center, you definitely “risk losing what you value” (your own basis) and get your ass kicked.

 

Therefore when the battle is joined, The underdog will win.

 

No one can defeat you if you can continue to be like water (or valley of the universe). 

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