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joeblast

Huo Hou Tu Translation

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The Huo Hou Tu is one of the lesser paid attention to of the 3 chinese internal alchemy artifacts....well, I decided to study it a little more closely, but unfortunately the place I bought the tapestry from, they only included translations of the large chunks of text.  I'm interested in translations of all the rest of the chinese characters that label everything.  I cant really understand just what this is without the labels!  Its worse than when your friend steals your phone and changes the language to Greek (but we know better and secure our devices these days, lol.)

 

If anyone would like to help, that's be stellar.  I'll provide some closeup pictures.

 

But for now, this is the huo hou tu, if nobody has seen it.  The "Firing process knacks chart."

 

a7MYuz0.jpg

 

Appropriate to start out with the foundation, eh?

 

vONxZ7l.jpg

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On 21.01.2018 at 9:44 PM, joeblast said:


Hello @joeblast
Thanks forproviding these charts. I follwed your link, but there is no explanation where the last chart goes from.
I heard that Nei Jing Tu and Xiu Zhen Tu are from Baiyun Guan, Beijing , but where is this Huo Hou Tu from?

Is it modern compilation or the ancient map
Thank you.

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With all due respect to this project, this is what they say:
 

Quote

There are charts and diagrams such as Nei Jing Tu, Xiu Zhen Tu and Huo Hou Tu which describe Qigong practices.


Well, that's a disappointment :(

I've found two articles about Huo Hou Tu, but they both are in Chinese, so that will take time to translate...
http://blog.sina.com.cn/s/blog_95249dd10101hbma.html
http://blog.sina.com.cn/s/blog_56184f9c0102wadl.html

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second article

 

https://imgur.com/a/llerC9O

IDKAWlV.png

iCVKV3A.png

SgkFd0t.png

d1dEL01.png

pppeUnk.png

WnPZrPA.png

 

 

 

I'm having some measure of luck translating the labels from the tapestry, but its not getting all of them.  I'll probably have to....well, the best thing for my brain would be to just draw and reproduce the entire thing and then have something I can write notes all over...that would perhaps be the most thorough way to highlight all of the characters that I need to seek out further translation on....if I can get 75, 80% without bothering anyone, lol

Edited by joeblast
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This is an interesting conversation.

 

at the beginning, you say you want to start with understanding the foundation. From your translation, it seems to say that this foundation is called jiu gong mingtang(九宫明堂)。but 九宫 means a type of chinese music. Does anyone know anything about this?

 

on the left, the rabbit means yin. On the right, the rooster means yang. Am i correct?

 

at the bottom, there are more characters which are about music. Such as the character 宮。it says there are 63 宮?? I am confused.

 

i look forward to any further conversation about this

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From "my" translation...I'll assume you mean google's translation...but if those characters are all together, then it may mean something other than just the first two characters alone.  I dont know where in the translation its referring to, perhaps you could point it out so as to save dig time :)  I dont know much chinese, but I know some stuff like those little things matter.

 

While the yin rabbit yang rooster connection is there, there's also other things, like the properties of the animals, and the cauldron on the rabbit's side, the elixir on the rooster's side.  This would indicate that its proper to quickly set up the cauldron and confidently cultivate the elixir - dont take it for granted when the sumbich glows!  That would also fall into some of the characters on the top of the foundation, translated as "bright figure hall" at the top of the steps.

 

The steps and text next to them indicate there's more than 1 path to the throne room, but the path up the steps is marked "law door," so that indicates while there's more than one way to do this, they all follow the same laws.

 

Some of the translation is a bit odd in those squares and I havent finished the translation on them - if google cant translate a character then I have to start digging elsewhere.  I got to a point where I decided to just get out my large drawing pad and start duplicating it so I have something I can take notes on.

 

At the top of the foundation where things come full circle, the single yang line and single yin line are there, with a root-like indication that yang will further the core of the root, and yin develops the rootlets that make the root system thorough.  And there's the turtle, telling you its going to be some time (=dont rush it) before the single line develops into two lines (lower dantien, upper dantien) before the two become 3 and move into the hexagrams.

 

I'd write more if my translations were more complete at this point :D

Edited by joeblast
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On 9/18/2018 at 4:32 PM, yuuichi said:

jiu gong mingtang(九宫明堂)。but 九宫 means a type of chinese music. Does anyone know anything about this?

jiu gong - nine palaces is a system of numerology with universal application, including music

明堂 is one of these palaces

 

On 9/18/2018 at 4:32 PM, yuuichi said:

on the left, the rabbit means yin. On the right, the rooster means yang. Am i correct?

almost. these are the west and east, with turtle denoting the north

 

On 9/18/2018 at 4:32 PM, yuuichi said:

it says there are 63 宮?? I am confused.

yes, but 60x3

The Numerology of Nine Star Fengshui

https://www.fengshuigate.com/numerology.html
  1. The 3x3 grid illustrated in this diagram is called the jiugong, or Palace of Nine ... three sixty-term, ganzhi cycles of 180 years called the sanyuan

 

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On 2018-09-15 at 2:09 PM, DaoKeeper said:

With all due respect to this project, this is what they say:
 


Well, that's a disappointment :(

There is a book on the Nei Jing Tu that is supposed to be out now, but it got labeled "out of stock" directly at the publisher, and my attempt to preorder and reserve a copy didn't work. 

 

The author, Ian Duncan, claim he is a disciple in two Long Men Pai lineages. 

If the book ever becomes available, it will be interesting to see how it is interpreted by an author that is actually within the tradition that have the image. 

 

The project mentioned above is affiliated with a practitioner that originated with Mantak Chias organisation. 

I would not rely on any interpretation from that quarter. 

 

But I have a theory you might feel is helpful:

 

Daoists are fed these charts and a bunch of classic texts. 

They are all inherently gibberish, but leads to two paths. 

1) You scream "fuck this" (or a chinese equvivalent), then sit down and think of nothing. The frustration principle push you through the Gate and you realize the Dao. 

2) You make up an explanation, and this becomes another side door added to the daoist tradition, leading to not realizing the Dao. 

 

The second one is Chia, me (technically a Buddhist side door in my case)😅 , and a lot of other boys and gals. 

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