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dmattwads

Anatta (no-self)

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Recently I have come to understand that "I" am not "my" will, or volition i.e. (the 4th khandha) though for a long time I had assumed I was. But when I realized in regards to "bad habbits" that "I" was not making the decision, that "I" was not wanting (because if "I" was I would obviously have not chosen to have a particular habit or craving, and if I had I could just drop it "at will"). It was weird to realize that I was not in control of the "will".

 

So this lead me to ponder "if I am not my will, if I can see my will as a separate thing, then what is this thing I call "I" to know the will is not me?". So since I knew I was not the "doer" and I was aware of this then I must be the "knower" of this or consciousness or the (5th khandha).

 

But then it occurred to me that for a long time I just "knew" I was my "will" and since it became understood by me that I am not, then it seemed reasonable for me to conclude that I am also not my consciousness. Also who or what is aware that I have a consciousness?

 

So now to the question. If "I" am not my will (4th khandha) and not my consciousness (5th khandha) (nor any of the other khandhas) then who or what is this thing I call me that is aware that I am not these khandhas?

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It's always at least one of the aggregates relating to at least one of the others.

 

You already understand how form, feeling, cognition and volition aren't self. Consciousness isn't self either, because it requires the other aggregates to arise and function.

 

The understanding 'none of the aggregates are I or mine' arises when volition drives consciousness to inspect the other aggregates, and the interrelationships between them. With the experience of not finding a self, the cognition aggregate stops conceiving of one.

 

So the cognition aggregate no longer conceives of self, and the consciousness aggregate is aware of this. Even in that experience, at least two aggregates are functioning dependently, not one central thing.

 

The key is to keep noticing that the thing that does X isn't the same as the thing that does Y.

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Thanks, good stuff to contemplate. I asked the local monk if consciousness remained upon the death of an arahant, and he said no. I'm still having a hard time wrapping my mind around that lol. So whats left? what gets enlightened?

 

I thought I'd add that in my pondering of volition that it occurred to me that since kamma arises from intention which to the best of my understanding would be the 4th khandha. Also in looking at what drove will (4th khandha) since it is not "me", I realized that at least on the inner/mental level must also be kamma.

 

So it seems like kamma is made by the will, and works itself out through the will.

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I asked the local monk if consciousness remained upon the death of an arahant, and he said no. I'm still having a hard time wrapping my mind around that lol. So whats left? what gets enlightened?

This perhaps:

"'Your question should not be phrased in this way: Where do these four great elements — the earth property, the liquid property, the fire property, and the wind property — cease without remainder? Instead, it should be phrased like this:

 

 

Where do water, earth, fire, & wind

have no footing?

Where are long & short,

coarse & fine,

fair & foul,

name & form

brought to an end?

"'And the answer to that is:

 

 

Consciousness without feature,[1]

without end,

luminous all around:

Here water, earth, fire, & wind

have no footing.

Here long & short

coarse & fine

fair & foul

name & form

are all brought to an end.

With the cessation of [the activity of] consciousness

each is here brought to an end.'"

That is what the Blessed One said. Gratified, Kevatta the householder delighted in the Blessed One's words.

Ask your monk about Viññanam anidassanam. It looks like he's conflating the cessation of the activity of consciousness with the cessation of consciousness.

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Thanks, good stuff to contemplate. I asked the local monk if consciousness remained upon the death of an arahant, and he said no. I'm still having a hard time wrapping my mind around that lol. So whats left? what gets enlightened?

 

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.072.than.html

 

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying in Savatthi, at Jeta's Grove,Anathapindika's monastery. Then the wanderer Vacchagotta went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, exchanged courteous greetings with him. After an exchange of friendly greetings & courtesies, he sat to one side. As he was sitting there he asked the Blessed One: "How is it, Master Gotama, does Master Gotama hold the view: 'The cosmos is eternal: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless'?"

"...no..."

"Then does Master Gotama hold the view: 'The cosmos is not eternal: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless'?"

"...no..."

"Then does Master Gotama hold the view: 'The cosmos is finite: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless'?"

"...no..."

"Then does Master Gotama hold the view: 'The cosmos is infinite: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless'?"

"...no..."

"Then does Master Gotama hold the view: 'The soul & the body are the same: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless'?"

"...no..."

"Then does Master Gotama hold the view: 'The soul is one thing and the body another: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless'?"

"...no..."

"Then does Master Gotama hold the view: 'After death a Tathagata exists: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless'?"

"...no..."

"Then does Master Gotama hold the view: 'After death a Tathagata does not exist: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless'?"

"...no..."

"Then does Master Gotama hold the view: 'After death a Tathagata both exists & does not exist: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless'?"

"...no..."

"Then does Master Gotama hold the view: 'After death a Tathagata neither exists nor does not exist: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless'?"

"...no..."

"How is it, Master Gotama, when Master Gotama is asked if he holds the view 'the cosmos is eternal...'... 'after death a Tathagata neither exists nor does not exist: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless,' he says '...no...' in each case. Seeing what drawback, then, is Master Gotama thus entirely dissociated from each of these ten positions?"

"Vaccha, the position that 'the cosmos is eternal' is a thicket of views, a wilderness of views, a contortion of views, a writhing of views, a fetter of views. It is accompanied by suffering, distress, despair, & fever, and it does not lead to disenchantment, dispassion, cessation; to calm, direct knowledge, full Awakening, Unbinding.

"The position that 'the cosmos is not eternal'...

"...'the cosmos is finite'...

"...'the cosmos is infinite'...

"...'the soul & the body are the same'...

"...'the soul is one thing and the body another'...

"...'after death a Tathagata exists'...

"...'after death a Tathagata does not exist'...

"...'after death a Tathagata both exists & does not exist'...

"...'after death a Tathagata neither exists nor does not exist'... does not lead to disenchantment, dispassion, cessation; to calm, direct knowledge, full Awakening, Unbinding."

"Does Master Gotama have any position at all?"

"A 'position,' Vaccha, is something that a Tathagata has done away with. What a Tathagata sees is this: 'Such is form, such its origination, such its disappearance; such is feeling, such its origination, such its disappearance; such is perception...such are fabrications...such is consciousness, such its origination, such its disappearance.' Because of this, I say, a Tathagata — with the ending, fading away, cessation, renunciation, & relinquishment of all construings, all excogitations, all I-making & mine-making & obsessions with conceit — is, through lack of clinging/sustenance, released."

"But, Master Gotama, the monk whose mind is thus released: Where does he reappear?"

"'Reappear,' Vaccha, doesn't apply."

"In that case, Master Gotama, he does not reappear."

"'Does not reappear,' Vaccha, doesn't apply."

"...both does & does not reappear."

"...doesn't apply."

"...neither does nor does not reappear."

"...doesn't apply."

"How is it, Master Gotama, when Master Gotama is asked if the monk reappears... does not reappear... both does & does not reappear... neither does nor does not reappear, he says, '...doesn't apply' in each case. At this point, Master Gotama, I am befuddled; at this point, confused. The modicum of clarity coming to me from your earlier conversation is now obscured."

"Of course you're befuddled, Vaccha. Of course you're confused. Deep, Vaccha, is this phenomenon, hard to see, hard to realize, tranquil, refined, beyond the scope of conjecture, subtle, to-be-experienced by the wise. For those with other views, other practices, other satisfactions, other aims, other teachers, it is difficult to know. That being the case, I will now put some questions to you. Answer as you see fit. What do you think, Vaccha: If a fire were burning in front of you, would you know that, 'This fire is burning in front of me'?"

"...yes..."

"And suppose someone were to ask you, Vaccha, 'This fire burning in front of you, dependent on what is it burning?' Thus asked, how would you reply?"

"...I would reply, 'This fire burning in front of me is burning dependent on grass & timber as its sustenance.'"

"If the fire burning in front of you were to go out, would you know that, 'This fire burning in front of me has gone out'?"

"...yes..."

"And suppose someone were to ask you, 'This fire that has gone out in front of you, in which direction from here has it gone? East? West? North? Or south?' Thus asked, how would you reply?"

"That doesn't apply, Master Gotama. Any fire burning dependent on a sustenance of grass and timber, being unnourished — from having consumed that sustenance and not being offered any other — is classified simply as 'out' (unbound)."

"Even so, Vaccha, any physical form by which one describing the Tathagata would describe him: That the Tathagata has abandoned, its root destroyed, made like a palmyra stump, deprived of the conditions of development, not destined for future arising. Freed from the classification of form, Vaccha, the Tathagata is deep, boundless, hard to fathom, like the sea. 'Reappears' doesn't apply. 'Does not reappear' doesn't apply. 'Both does & does not reappear' doesn't apply. 'Neither reappears nor does not reappear' doesn't apply.

"Any feeling... Any perception... Any fabrication...

"Any consciousness by which one describing the Tathagata would describe him: That the Tathagata has abandoned, its root destroyed, made like a palmyra stump, deprived of the conditions of development, not destined for future arising. Freed from the classification of consciousness, Vaccha, the Tathagata is deep, boundless, hard to fathom, like the sea. 'Reappears' doesn't apply. 'Does not reappear' doesn't apply. 'Both does & does not reappear' doesn't apply. 'Neither reappears nor does not reappear' doesn't apply."

When this was said, the wanderer Vacchagotta said to the Blessed One: "Master Gotama, it is as if there were a great sala tree not far from a village or town: From inconstancy, its branches and leaves would wear away, its bark would wear away, its sapwood would wear away, so that on a later occasion — divested of branches, leaves, bark, & sapwood — it would stand as pure heartwood. In the same way, Master Gotama's words are divested of branches, leaves, bark, & sapwood and stand as pure heartwood.

"Magnificent, Master Gotama! Magnificent! Just as if he were to place upright what was overturned, to reveal what was hidden, to show the way to one who was lost, or were to carry a lamp into the dark so that those with eyes could see forms, in the same way has Master Gotama — through many lines of reasoning — made the Dhamma clear. I go to Master Gotama for refuge, to the Dhamma, and to the Sangha of monks. May Master Gotama remember me as a lay follower who has gone to him for refuge, from this day forward, for life."

 

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn44/sn44.002.than.html

 

..."What do you think, Anuradha: Is form constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"And is that which is inconstant easeful or stressful?"

"Stressful, lord."

"And is it proper to regard what is inconstant, stressful, subject to change as: 'This is mine. This is my self. This is what I am'?"

"No, lord."

"Is feeling constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."...

"Is perception constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."...

"Are fabrications constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."...

"Is consciousness constant or inconstant?

"Inconstant, lord."

"And is that which is inconstant easeful or stressful?"

"Stressful, lord."

"And is it proper to regard what is inconstant, stressful, subject to change as: 'This is mine. This is my self. This is what I am'?"

"No, lord."

"What do you think, Anuradha: Do you regard form as the Tathagata?"

"No, lord."

"Do you regard feeling as the Tathagata?"

"No, lord."

"Do you regard perception as the Tathagata?"

"No, lord."

"Do you regard fabrications as the Tathagata?"

"No, lord."

"Do you regard consciousness as the Tathagata?"

"No, lord."

"What do you think, Anuradha: Do you regard the Tathagata as being in form?... Elsewhere than form?... In feeling?... Elsewhere than feeling?... In perception?... Elsewhere than perception?... In fabrications?... Elsewhere than fabrications?... In consciousness?... Elsewhere than consciousness?"

"No, lord."

"What do you think: Do you regard the Tathagata as form-feeling-perception-fabrications-consciousness?"

"No, lord."

"Do you regard the Tathagata as that which is without form, without feeling, without perception, without fabrications, without consciousness?"

"No, lord."

"And so, Anuradha — when you can't pin down the Tathagata as a truth or reality even in the present life — is it proper for you to declare, 'Friends, the Tathagata — the supreme man, the superlative man, attainer of the superlative attainment — being described, is described otherwise than with these four positions: The Tathagata exists after death, does not exist after death, both does & does not exist after death, neither exists nor does not exist after death'?"

"No, lord."

"Very good, Anuradha. Very good. Both formerly & now, it is only stress that I describe, and the cessation of stress."

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Thanks, good stuff to contemplate. I asked the local monk if consciousness remained upon the death of an arahant, and he said no. I'm still having a hard time wrapping my mind around that lol. So whats left? what gets enlightened?

This perhaps:

Ask your monk about Viññanam anidassanam. It looks like he's conflating the cessation of the activity of consciousness with the cessation of consciousness.

 

Vinnanam anidassanam refers to to the nibbana of an arahant while living. The post-mortem destination of an arahants consciousness does not apply, in Hinayana, since all conditions for rebirth in the three realms i.e. samsara, have been eradicated. Please refer to the links in this post for more detailed explanations:

 

http://thetaobums.com/topic/33091-immortal-atman/?p=509673

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...

What is the meaning of the never returner?

 

I contemplated the passages quoted by Simple_Jack for many years.

 

To teach only dhukka and the cessation of dhukka.

 

I think the historical buddha, no doubt after much consideration, perhaps made a conscious decision with regard to the form of his teachings.

 

He always stressed pragmatism, didn't he?

 

That is surely why he is known as the great physician of the world, rather than the great scholar, or sage.

...

Edited by Captain Mar-Vell
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To teach only dhukka and the cessation of dhukka.

Or: "Very good, Anuradha. Very good. Both formerly & now, it is only stress that I describe, and the cessation of stress."

 

Perhaps my favourite sentence in the whole cannon. With it, a myriad of extraneous stuff is washed away - it cuts to the core of experiential release - as also described in Mahamudra and Spanda Shaivism. It's essentially the same process, as there is only your own subjective mind which can taste release when all is said and done.

 

The depth and profundity varies, but the essence of unbinding is captured in that very sentence.

 

P.S. I also covered this topic in my PPF thread.

Edited by yabyum24
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Or: "Very good, Anuradha. Very good. Both formerly & now, it is only stress that I describe, and the cessation of stress."

 

Perhaps my favourite sentence in the whole cannon. With it, a myriad of extraneous stuff is washed away - it cuts to the core of experiential release - as also described in Mahamudra and Spanda Shaivism. It's essentially the same process, as there is only your own subjective mind which can taste release when all is said and done.

 

The depth and profundity varies, but the essence of unbinding is captured in that very sentence.

 

P.S. I also covered this topic in my PPF thread.

 

Really? I feel that the formulation from Buddha, “When this exists, that comes to be; with the arising of this, that arises. When this does not exist, that does not come to be; with the cessation of this, that ceases.”, is many times more significant because understanding the dependent nature of afflictions leads to attainment of stream entry.

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Really? I feel that the formulation from Buddha, “When this exists, that comes to be; with the arising of this, that arises. When this does not exist, that does not come to be; with the cessation of this, that ceases.”, is many times more significant because understanding the dependent nature of afflictions leads to attainment of stream entry.

Understanding the nature of afflictions is not part of the refuge process. That is simply knowledge to arouse the motivation to abandon wrong views. Therefore, it may not be right to say that understanding the dependent nature of afflictions directly leads to attainment of stream entry. Stream entry comes from taking refuge correctly.

 

In the Four Noble Truths, the refuge process is formed in only truth 3 and 4. Truth 1 and 2 is there to be worked on, and if worked according to the Eightfold Path, leads to cessation of dukkha. But this knowledge (dukkha and its origin) is not to be understood as part of Dharma, so we dont actually take refuge in that. To have this clarified is quite important, imo, as it will dispel misunderstanding that Buddhism places too much emphasis on suffering and morbid reflections. They ought to realize that dukkha is actually not a truth, and by adopting(taking refuge in) the 3rd and 4th Noble Truth, that falseness is unmasked, and happiness follows.

 

The reason im saying this is to clarify that while what you mentioned may be significant, it is not significant enough as a means of refuge, therefore, is not actually Dharma. However, the resultant fruit of applying that knowledge is, and therefore refuge-worthy.

 

Just wanted to throw it out there ~ in case some are not aware of this.

Edited by C T
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Understanding the nature of afflictions is not part of the refuge process. That is simply knowledge to arouse the motivation to abandon wrong views. Therefore, it may not be right to say that understanding the dependent nature of afflictions directly leads to attainment of stream entry. Stream entry comes from taking refuge correctly.

 

In the Four Noble Truths, the refuge process is formed in only truth 3 and 4. Truth 1 and 2 is there to be worked on, and if worked according to the Eightfold Path, leads to cessation of dukkha. But this knowledge (dukkha and its origin) is not to be understood as part of Dharma, so we dont actually take refuge in that. To have this clarified is quite important, imo, as it will dispel misunderstanding that Buddhism places too much emphasis on suffering and morbid reflections. They ought to realize that dukkha is actually not a truth, and by adopting(taking refuge in) the 3rd and 4th Noble Truth, that falseness is unmasked, and happiness follows.

 

The reason im saying this is to clarify that while what you mentioned may be significant, it is not significant enough as a means of refuge, therefore, is not actually Dharma. However, the resultant fruit of applying that knowledge is, and therefore refuge-worthy.

 

Just wanted to throw it out there ~ in case some are not aware of this.

 

The formulation, “When this exists, that comes to be; with the arising of this, that arises. When this does not exist, that does not come to be; with the cessation of this, that ceases.”, represents refuge in the buddhadharma because Buddha's awakening to dependent origination was a result of that insight. It is the quintessence of the buddhadharma which contains the 4 noble truths and 8-fold noble path therein; becoming free of the fetters which bind requires confidence in this.

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The formulation, “When this exists, that comes to be; with the arising of this, that arises. When this does not exist, that does not come to be; with the cessation of this, that ceases.”, represents refuge in the buddhadharma because Buddha's awakening to dependent origination was a result of that insight. It is the quintessence of the buddhadharma which contains the 4 noble truths and 8-fold noble path therein; becoming free of the fetters which bind requires confidence in this.

Let it be. I have no wish to argue.

 

Realizations are not the fruit of Dharma. I think there is too much grasping at the importance of realizations. No matter how vital these are, at some point, they have to be abandoned. What you quoted above is not exempted.

 

The fruit (of which refuge is sought under) of Dharma is the cessation of all views. Total extinction. Both what are deemed right, and of course, wrong ones.

 

Therefore, the quintessence of Buddhadharma is the complete blowing out of craving. This is not a realization, its a fruition of taking the correct refuge.

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Let it be. I have no wish to argue.

 

Realizations are not the fruit of Dharma. I think there is too much grasping at the importance of realizations. No matter how vital these are, at some point, they have to be abandoned. What you quoted above is not exempted.

 

The fruit (of which refuge is sought under) of Dharma is the cessation of all views. Total extinction. Both what are deemed right, and of course, wrong ones.

 

Therefore, the quintessence of Buddhadharma is the complete blowing out of craving. This is not a realization, its a fruition of taking the correct refuge.

 

What is the view to cultivate, according to the Buddha, which leads to the 'complete blowing out of craving'? Its described as none other than dependent origination: "He who sees Dependent Origination, sees the Dhamma; he who sees the Dhamma, sees Dependent Origination [MN 28]." Refuge represents confidence in the teachings of dependent origination i.e. the 4 noble truths and 8-fold noble path.

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What is the view to cultivate, according to the Buddha, which leads to the 'complete blowing out of craving'? Its described as none other than dependent origination: "He who sees Dependent Origination, sees the Dhamma; he who sees the Dhamma, sees Dependent Origination [MN 28]." Refuge represents confidence in the teachings of dependent origination i.e. the 4 noble truths and 8-fold noble path.

The view of no views.

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The view of no views.

 

The 'viewless view' is none other than dependent origination, free from views of "is" or "is not", carrying out the path which leads to the cessation of all the myriad views; including itself.

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The 'viewless view' is none other than dependent origination, free from views of "is" or "is not", carrying out the path which leads to the cessation of all the myriad views; including itself.

as you wish...

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as you wish...

 

What path do you wish to seek? Treading the path is not treading any path at all; unborn and completely illusory, the touch of the keys on the keyboard, this very thought, is the pathless path; the path of no-path, not from self, nor other, without seeking, without turning away: revealing utmost simplicity in this very action without clinging to this ephemeral moment. No reference, no thing to rest on, just this illusory display.

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"If one takes refuge in the dharma, one is taking refuge in the truth of cessation and the

truth of the path, and not in the truth of suffering and the truth of origination. The

truths of suffering and its origination are part of the dharma, but they are what must

be overcome [spang bya] or transcended and, therefore, are not themselves objects of

refuge. Suffering and the origination of suffering by themselves are not the dharma.

They become the dharma only when overcome." ~~~ Dzogchen Khenpo Choga Rinpoche
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^^^

 

Yes, of course, comprehending the dependent nature of afflictions is the truth of the path I.e dependent origination, which leads to the truth of cessation by way of the fourth noble truth which is the 8-fold noble path. Therefore, confidence in the teachings of dependent origination and the 4 noble truths leads to freedom from the fetters.

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^^^ Yes, of course, comprehending the dependent nature of afflictions is the truth of the path I.e dependent origination, which leads to the truth of cessation by way of the fourth noble truth which is the 8-fold noble path. Therefore, confidence in the teachings of dependent origination and the 4 noble truths leads to freedom from the fetters.

Confidence to be increased in the 3rd and 4th Noble Truth only.

 

To have confidence in 1 and 2 is to solidify the existence of stress and its origin (ignorance), which is incorrect. Dukkha is a man-made state, a result of wrong views. Thats all we need to know. Dukkha is not worthy of contemplation, therefore is not part of the refuge process. Therefore, it is more correct to have a clear understanding that refuge is not sought in truths 1 and 2, for they are to be transcended, as per the advice of Khenpo Choga Rinpoche.

 

The right view is to seek motivation in the knowledge that stress can end, and follow the right path towards that. This is refuge.

 

It sounds argumentative, but i am not disagreeing with your assertions. Just stressing the importance of separating what is to be abandoned and what is worthy of refuge. This knowing makes a huge difference in Dharma practice.

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Confidence to be increased in the 3rd and 4th Noble Truth only.

 

You're construing the above as the 1st and 2nd noble truths when it actually represents the 3rd and 4th. What does the Buddha ascribe as the means towards the extirpation of craving and the cessation of dukkha? How does an individual, according to the Buddha, arrive at the cessation of dukkha? By means of the 8-fold noble path which starts with cultivating right view which is none other than dependent origination. I discussed in other threads, that this path differs in its contaminated form for a deluded sentient being as the mundane path, and for an ariya-puggala which then becomes the supramundane path in its pure form. Comprehending the dependent nature of afflictions are expressed in the conceptual model of the 12 nidanas, such as in the Kaccayanagotta Sutta, which Nagarjuna summarizes into 3 categories of samskaras, karma, and dukkha.

 

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn12/sn12.015.than.html

 

Dwelling at Savatthi... Then Ven. Kaccayana Gotta approached the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down, sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed One: "Lord, 'Right view, right view,' it is said. To what extent is there right view?"

"By & large, Kaccayana, this world is supported by (takes as its object) a polarity, that of existence & non-existence. But when one sees the origination of the world as it actually is with right discernment, 'non-existence' with reference to the world does not occur to one. When one sees the cessation of the world as it actually is with right discernment, 'existence' with reference to the world does not occur to one.

"By & large, Kaccayana, this world is in bondage to attachments, clingings (sustenances), & biases. But one such as this does not get involved with or cling to these attachments, clingings, fixations of awareness, biases, or obsessions; nor is he resolved on 'my self.' He has no uncertainty or doubt that just stress, when arising, is arising; stress, when passing away, is passing away. In this, his knowledge is independent of others. It's to this extent, Kaccayana, that there is right view.

"'Everything exists': That is one extreme. 'Everything doesn't exist': That is a second extreme. Avoiding these two extremes, the Tathagata teaches the Dhamma via the middle: From ignorance as a requisite condition come fabrications. From fabrications as a requisite condition comes consciousness. From consciousness as a requisite condition comes name-&-form. From name-&-form as a requisite condition come the six sense media. From the six sense media as a requisite condition comes contact. From contact as a requisite condition comes feeling. From feeling as a requisite condition comes craving. From craving as a requisite condition comes clinging/sustenance. From clinging/sustenance as a requisite condition comes becoming. From becoming as a requisite condition comes birth. From birth as a requisite condition, then aging & death, sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair come into play. Such is the origination of this entire mass of stress & suffering.

"Now from the remainderless fading & cessation of that very ignorance comes the cessation of fabrications. From the cessation of fabrications comes the cessation of consciousness. From the cessation of consciousness comes the cessation of name-&-form. From the cessation of name-&-form comes the cessation of the six sense media. From the cessation of the six sense media comes the cessation of contact. From the cessation of contact comes the cessation of feeling. From the cessation of feeling comes the cessation of craving. From the cessation of craving comes the cessation of clinging/sustenance. From the cessation of clinging/sustenance comes the cessation of becoming. From the cessation of becoming comes the cessation of birth. From the cessation of birth, then aging & death, sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair all cease. Such is the cessation of this entire mass of stress & suffering."

 

http://www.lotsawahouse.org/indian-masters/nagarjuna/heart-dependent-origination

 

The Heart of Dependent Origination

by Arya Nagarjuna

 

In the language of India: pratityasamutpada hridaya karika

 

In the language of Tibet: རྟེན་ཅིང་འབྲེལ་པར་འབྱུང་བའི་སྙིང་པོའི་ཙིག་ལེའུར་བྱས་པ།, (ten ching drelpar jungwé nyingpö tsik le'ur jepa)

 

Homage to Mañjushri, the Youthful!

  1. These different links, twelve in number,

    Which Buddha taught as dependent origination,

    Can be summarized in three categories:

    Mental afflictions, karma and suffering.

  2. The first, eighth and ninth are afflictions,

    The second and tenth are karma,

    The remaining seven are suffering.

    Thus the twelve links are grouped in three.

  3. From the three the two originate,

    And from the two the seven come,

    From seven the three come once again—

    Thus the wheel of existence turns and turns.

  4. All beings consist of causes and effects,

    In which there is no ‘sentient being’ at all.

    From phenomena which are exclusively empty,

    There arise only empty phenomena.

    All things are devoid of any ‘I’ or ‘mine’.

  5. Like a recitation, a candle, a mirror, a seal,

    A magnifying glass, a seed, sourness, or a sound,

    So also with the continuation of the aggregates—

    The wise should know they are not transferred.

  6. Then, as for extremely subtle entities,

    Those who regard them with nihilism,

    Lacking precise and thorough knowledge,

    Will not see the actuality of conditioned arising.

  7. In this, there is not a thing to be removed,

    Nor the slightest thing to be added.

    It is looking perfectly into reality itself,

    And when reality is seen, complete liberation.

This concludes the verses on ‘The Heart of Dependent Origination’ composed by the teacher Arya Nagarjuna.

| Translated by Adam Pearcey, Rigpa Translations, 2008.

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The right view is to seek motivation in the knowledge that stress can end, and follow the right path towards that. This is refuge.

Nicely said CT.

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