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Seeing, Recognising & Maintaining One's Enlightening Potential


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#1 C T

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Posted 31 December 2014 - 07:04 AM

From The Buddhist Path, by Khenpo Tsewang Dongyal & Khenchen Palden Sherab Rinpoches. 

 

"Taming the mind does not mean eliminating outer objects or suppressing inner thoughts. It means revealing and maintaining the natural state of the mind. Taming the mind has nothing to do with cultivating certain thoughts; it is simply keeping the mind in its fundamental state, where its clarity and wisdom are revealed. The true nature of the mind is calm and clear and full of compassion and love and wisdom.

 

We do not always experience the mind in this way because ignorance obscures our awareness of the mind’s true nature. However, the wisdom nature is always there, and it can shine through and guide us in our lives. Even foolish people have wisdom and can exhibit beautiful qualities because this basic goodness is found equally in all beings. Not only human beings, but all sentient beings have the same nature and potential for enlightenment. The problem is that temporary obscurations cover and distort the essential nature of the mind. When we completely remove the ignorance and reveal the mind’s true nature, we are enlightened.

 

It is important to remember that our true nature is only temporarily hidden. When we know that, we can work with courage and joy to remove the ignorance and let the essence of the mind shine forth. It is important for our diligence to be based on a joyful attitude, because without joyful effort we cannot reveal this true nature.

 

We need to exert ourselves now because this opportunity will not last forever. We must remember impermanence and the changing stages of life and death. Thinking about death and impermanence is often unpleasant — we usually do not like to acknowledge that everything, including ourselves, is subject to the law of incessant change. But change has good aspects as well, because without change there is no growth or improvement. With the right techniques, skills, and effort, we can learn and make positive changes. By understanding impermanence and causality we can work toward enlightenment and make the most of this human life."

 

**************************************************************************************

 

 

Wishing all a blessed 2015 and beyond. May all beings continue to find the causes of lasting peace and happiness. 


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Om svabhava shuddha sarva dharma svabhava shuddho 'ham!
Om shunyata jnana vajra svabhava atmako 'ham! 
Om ah hum hra phat!
Om muni muni mahamuni Shakyamuniye svaha! 
  
Appearances are mind, mind is emptiness, emptiness is spontaneous presence, spontaneous presence is self-liberation.
(9th Karmapa)
 

The objects perceived by sentient beings 

are like the appearance of illusions;

Sentient beings themselves are in the nature of illusion

they all arise through dependent origination. - Nagarjuna


#2 adept

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Posted 31 December 2014 - 07:49 AM

Very nice post CT, and all the best for the new year.
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#3 silent thunder

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Posted 31 December 2014 - 10:10 AM

time to practice... :)


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Not one raindrop has ever fallen in the wrong spot... there are no accidents.

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#4 C T

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Posted 31 December 2014 - 01:23 PM

"Dzogchen practitioners must combine their meditation on emptiness with compassion. Emptiness means egolessness. This means freedom from selfishness and all clinging. Compassion means caring for all sentient beings, and helping them find total peace and happiness. Practicing on emptiness alone will not help you reach enlightenment. There is a non-Buddhist meditation school in India that teaches that the realization of emptiness comes from completely blocking all sensory experiences. Even if this practice leads to emptiness- realization, if you have trained yourself in blocking the senses how can you practice compassion? It is not our intention to promote Buddhism and de-value other schools. We just want to remind you that the true nature of the mind is the unity of emptiness and compassion.

 

The Dzogchen teachings always talk about emptiness and clarity. Emptiness refers to the utter openness of the nature of the mind, while clarity refers to the rich and beautiful qualities inherent in the nature of the mind. Compassion is one of these qualities. If we accept emptiness and reject compassion, we’re knocking our heads against a wall. Therefore, don’t be partial—be open to the fullness of the teachings and the fullness of yourself. All the great teachers said this. We must practice the unity of emptiness and compassion, wisdom and skillful means, absolute truth and relative truth. When we do this, realization comes beautifully and perfectly.

 

Buddha Shakyamuni gave an important teaching called the King of Posala Sutra. Posala was an ancient city that is now called Shravasti; in Tibetan, it’s called Sharja. This is where the Buddha taught the Diamond Sutra. Addressing the king of Posala, the Buddha said, “Oh great king, you perform many activities, and do not have much time for spiritual pursuits, but if you keep one thing in your heart, you are practicing the Dharma—that is bodhichitta.” Bodhichitta is the core of the Buddha’s teachings, and the core of Guru Padmasambhava’s teachings. It is the essential teaching of all the great masters who followed them."

 

Venerable Khenpo Rinpoches
Pointing Out the Nature of Mind (p 149/150)


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Om svabhava shuddha sarva dharma svabhava shuddho 'ham!
Om shunyata jnana vajra svabhava atmako 'ham! 
Om ah hum hra phat!
Om muni muni mahamuni Shakyamuniye svaha! 
  
Appearances are mind, mind is emptiness, emptiness is spontaneous presence, spontaneous presence is self-liberation.
(9th Karmapa)
 

The objects perceived by sentient beings 

are like the appearance of illusions;

Sentient beings themselves are in the nature of illusion

they all arise through dependent origination. - Nagarjuna


#5 C T

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Posted 31 December 2014 - 02:37 PM

Question: What is the relationship between Dzogchen and bodhichitta?

 

Khenpo Rinpoches: "The Dzogchen teachings are the highest teachings of Buddha Shakyamuni. From the Dzogchen point of view, everything is totally equal in one profound state, without duality and distinctions. Dzogchen is the ultimate view of the true nature of mind, which includes love and compassion. When we practice Dzogchen we develop compassion and loving-kindness; Dzogchen practice cannot be separated from bodhichitta practice. We cannot ignore relative bodhichitta and accept absolute bodhichitta; both are part of our true nature and both are part of Dzogchen.

 

For this reason, before we meditate, we take refuge and develop the thought of bodhichitta. After we meditate we dedicate the merit to all sentient beings. Whenever we practice or do any kind of beneficial activity, we should not cling to it. At the absolute level, everything is totally pure and perfect in great emptiness. From that point of view, we are completely free from all dualistic concepts and clinging.

 

Until we come to realize the emptiness nature, we continue to follow our thoughts, judging things to be good or bad, better or worse, dirty or clean. Even while we are following our thoughts, the ultimate reality does not change. It is similar to the weather. When you see a cloudy, gray sky, you cannot see the sun, but that does not mean that the sun and the blue sky are not there. They are still there; the moving clouds do not affect them.

 

... Every person has the enlightened nature, but to actualize that nature it is necessary to practice bodhichitta, the love and compassion for all beings. Bodhichitta is universally precious; everybody appreciates it and everybody has the potential to develop it. Enlightenment is completely dependent upon developing compassion for all beings. The wish to attain enlightenment for the benefit of others is the essence of both the Mahayana and Vajrayana paths. When we develop inner wisdom, we can take care of all sentient beings, and radiate compassion and kindness throughout the universe. We can discover the true nature of the mind and of the entire world. In order to be able to do this, meditation practice is very important.

 

Bodhichitta is the root or the seed from which enlightenment develops. Bodhichitta is not found externally, but it is within your own mind. Although all of us have experienced love and compassion, these qualities need to be developed further. One way to increase them is to do the Dzogchen meditation of resting the mind in its own nature. This is because bodhichitta and emptiness have the same nature, the true nature of the mind. Practicing bodhichitta openly and freely will increase your understanding of emptiness because compassion and emptiness are inseparable aspects of the primordial state of being."

 

Venerable Khenpo Rinpoches
The Buddhist Path


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Om svabhava shuddha sarva dharma svabhava shuddho 'ham!
Om shunyata jnana vajra svabhava atmako 'ham! 
Om ah hum hra phat!
Om muni muni mahamuni Shakyamuniye svaha! 
  
Appearances are mind, mind is emptiness, emptiness is spontaneous presence, spontaneous presence is self-liberation.
(9th Karmapa)
 

The objects perceived by sentient beings 

are like the appearance of illusions;

Sentient beings themselves are in the nature of illusion

they all arise through dependent origination. - Nagarjuna


#6 C T

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Posted 31 December 2014 - 03:10 PM

Training in Meditation to See, Recognise, Maintain & Increase One's Enlightening Potential

 

MEDITATION: Abandoning the strangle hold of suffering and worry. 

 

This was written by the late Karma Tashi Thundrup. It is a highly effective meditational technique which helps to restore the natural balance of the mind and body.

 

We shall begin by creating a quiet place to sit, cross-legged if we can or on a low stool or straight-backed chair if we cannot. A firm cushion will help to provide a comfortable and stable seat. We sit completely relaxed with our back and neck straight, the spine balanced nicely on the pelvis. A straight back is necessary for the unobstructed passage of spinal energies when they arise.

 

The hands can be placed on the lap, palms upward, the right hand resting in the left and the tips of the thumbs touching. We can meditate with our eyes shut or open, but outer distractions are more easily avoided with the eyes closed. The eyeballs should be perfectly relaxed as in sleep, just gazing, to the mind's eye down the length of the nose.

 

Some teachers insist that one should focus the closed eyes sharply upon the point between the eyebrows where the Ajna chakra manifests but I should warn against this. The muscular strain of such a procedure creates the nervous illusion of flashing lights before the eyes which can easily lead one into a fantasy of meditational success. If you wish to put this sort of thing to the test, sit quietly in a darkened room, close your eyes and watch the fireworks as you push your eyeballs back and forth with your fingers.

 

In sitting meditation, we aim at a profound relaxation, any internal tension will defeat the object of the exercise. All we have to do is to watch our breath. Breathing through the nose we calmly concentrate upon our breathing and just watch the breath moving to and fro. 

 

As our concentration deepens we will find our mind, in a manner of speaking becoming one with our breathing. 
Our concentration must be absolutely calm and without effort. Absorption is the best word I can find to describe the required state of mind.

 

Thoughts will constantly arise to distract the attention. We do not try to block them off or shut them out in any way, but we observe them dispassionately from over our shoulder as it were, leading the mind, on a loose rein, gently back to the breath each time. 

 

That is all we have to do.

 

There is no need here for a lengthy dissertation on the manifold subjective results of our meditations for that would arouse a vicarious anticipation of events which is most undesirable. Suffice to say that gradually our awareness of being will become more detached from our thoughts. 

 

During our sitting sessions the grasping egotistical nature of our thoughts will become clearer to us, irrespective of whether these thoughts be considered good or bad. As our consciousness becomes finely tuned to the movement of the breath we shall in time develop an awareness of the currents of Pran Energy within the body. This meditation is natural Pranayama (the Way of Pran).

 

If the simple Buddhist practice of watching the breath is persevered with, we will discover that as our concentration deepens and thoughts fall away, the breath will quieten and slow down quite spontaneously. Then we should begin to experience a true meditative state of mind.

 

If at this stage we should begin to congratulate ourselves our meditation will simply go for a diffuse. We shall be exchanging Unconditioned Being for the delusion of achievement. Beware of the "How am I doing?" syndrome. It is a monstrous stumbling block on the path of meditation. 

 

Our approach to meditation is as important as the meditation itself. One Tibetan teacher has this to say: "Do not be consistent".

 

There are many Eastern Gurus who encourage their devotees to rise at 6 a.m. every day to do an hour's sitting before breakfast and another obligatory hour before retiring every night. For some of these teachers these obligatory hours are not enough and disciples are urged to spend more and more hours in sitting meditation. We are human beings however and not limpets. If we insist upon sitting cross-legged and cross-eyed for hours at a stretch we need have no surprise to find ourselves being used as a doorstop by one of our more active brethren.

 

Routines can easily condition and enslave us. We practice meditation to restore a quota of spontaneous being into our lives. Rigid routine in meditation is hardly the path to spontaneity. We should meditate when we feel like it. That is all. 

 

All kinds of internal happenings arise during sitting meditation of a paranormal or astral nature. It is your own psyche unfolding. Do not talk about them or you will inevitably become confused. We can become attached to these events, the side effects, so to speak, of meditation and tend to evaluate these events as good, bad or indifferent according to our expectations.

 

The Yogin who has realised his goal, however, places no great value upon these events which he recognises as mere projections of his own mind. Therefore we should not leave our sitting reflecting upon how good or bad it was, for the man of meditative power has long gone beyond ideas of good or bad. By the same token we shall not approach our sitting with great anticipation or apprehension. I shall not pontificate further about this for there are no words adequate enough for what I am trying to convey.

 

To summarise our meditation practice:

 

A comfortable seat, a straight back, hands on lap, palms up, tips of thumbs touching. Eyes closed and relaxed, "gazing down the nose". Breathe through the nose. 

 

Watch the breath. 

 

Calmly concentrate, the reins held loose. 

 

When thoughts arise do not resist them or block them off. Witness them from "over your shoulder", 
and gently lead the attention back to the breath. 

 

When you have done enough, rise calmly and slowly and go about your business. There you have it, a simple and very effective meditation technique.

 

A few words of warning which, like Government anti-tobacco warnings should be, by law, printed on the spine of every book about Meditation: 

 

WARNING 
MEDITATION IS NOT A BIG DEAL 
BIG DEALS CAN LEAD TO MENTAL ILLNESS AND SPIRITUAL DEATH

 


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Om svabhava shuddha sarva dharma svabhava shuddho 'ham!
Om shunyata jnana vajra svabhava atmako 'ham! 
Om ah hum hra phat!
Om muni muni mahamuni Shakyamuniye svaha! 
  
Appearances are mind, mind is emptiness, emptiness is spontaneous presence, spontaneous presence is self-liberation.
(9th Karmapa)
 

The objects perceived by sentient beings 

are like the appearance of illusions;

Sentient beings themselves are in the nature of illusion

they all arise through dependent origination. - Nagarjuna


#7 Spotless

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Posted 01 January 2015 - 12:21 AM

The use of the word Mind is so tempting and yet so very problematic. I find the word Awareness to be typically a much better translator of the ideas brought forth above. It's use in the west fairly secures almost complete misunderstanding.

#8 C T

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Posted 01 January 2015 - 12:40 AM

The use of the word Mind is so tempting and yet so very problematic. I find the word Awareness to be typically a much better translator of the ideas brought forth above. It's use in the west fairly secures almost complete misunderstanding.

Yep, i agree, Spotless - but certainly some who are familiar with Buddhist theory & practice will have learnt to distinguish between mind, Mind, awareness & consciousness, as these terms will all have been given a somewhat more thorough examination at some point during the practitioner's contemplative excursions down the Buddhist path. 


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Om svabhava shuddha sarva dharma svabhava shuddho 'ham!
Om shunyata jnana vajra svabhava atmako 'ham! 
Om ah hum hra phat!
Om muni muni mahamuni Shakyamuniye svaha! 
  
Appearances are mind, mind is emptiness, emptiness is spontaneous presence, spontaneous presence is self-liberation.
(9th Karmapa)
 

The objects perceived by sentient beings 

are like the appearance of illusions;

Sentient beings themselves are in the nature of illusion

they all arise through dependent origination. - Nagarjuna


#9 adept

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Posted 01 January 2015 - 01:53 AM

I'm finding that compassion is a very difficult quality for me to develop personally. The use of the mani mantra in both formal meditation, and throughout my day has helped a great deal. I feel that part of me is softening somewhat. I know there's a long way to go, but with the right intent and daily practice, I can change myself.
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#10 C T

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Posted 01 January 2015 - 02:25 AM

I'm finding that compassion is a very difficult quality for me to develop personally. The use of the mani mantra in both formal meditation, and throughout my day has helped a great deal. I feel that part of me is softening somewhat. I know there's a long way to go, but with the right intent and daily practice, I can change myself.

You are not alone. Even the Dalai Lama finds it challenging at times  :)

 


Om svabhava shuddha sarva dharma svabhava shuddho 'ham!
Om shunyata jnana vajra svabhava atmako 'ham! 
Om ah hum hra phat!
Om muni muni mahamuni Shakyamuniye svaha! 
  
Appearances are mind, mind is emptiness, emptiness is spontaneous presence, spontaneous presence is self-liberation.
(9th Karmapa)
 

The objects perceived by sentient beings 

are like the appearance of illusions;

Sentient beings themselves are in the nature of illusion

they all arise through dependent origination. - Nagarjuna


#11 adept

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Posted 01 January 2015 - 02:35 AM

That's comforting to know CT. Sometimes I feel VERY alone, even in the midst of family and friends.

#12 C T

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Posted 01 January 2015 - 03:11 AM

That's comforting to know CT. Sometimes I feel VERY alone, even in the midst of family and friends.

"The times when you are suffering can be those when you are open, and where you are extremely vulnerable can be where your greatest strength really lies.

 

Say to yourself: “I am not going to run away from this suffering. I want to use it in the best and richest way I can, so that I can become more compassionate and more helpful to others.” Suffering, after all, can teach us about compassion. If you suffer, you will know how it is when others suffer. And if you are in a position to help others, it is through your suffering that you will find the understanding and compassion to do so. Sometimes we think that to develop an open heart, to be truly loving and compassionate, means that we need to be passive, to allow others to abuse us, to smile and let anyone do what they want with us. Yet this is not what is meant by compassion. Quite the contrary. Compassion is not at all weak. It is the strength that arises out of seeing the true nature of suffering in the world. Compassion allows us to bear witness to that suffering, whether it is in ourselves or others, without fear; it allows us to name injustice without hesitation, and to act strongly, with all the skill at our disposal. To develop this mind state of compassion...is to learn to live, as the Buddha put it, with empathy for all living beings, without exception." 

-- Sharon Salzberg

 

 

Try as best you can to infuse and inspire your daily practice with a sense of lightness and humour. I know it can be difficult at times, but even the most seasoned practitioner will experience some form of negativity now and again. It will be helpful to heighten our mindfulness of response during these rough patches, remembering that each time we encounter an especially difficult phase, that those moments are actually the crest of our karmic past coming to a head, and that it is like finally arriving at a junction - at this point, where we turn, how we transform and grow, or not, this will rest entirely on our fundamental View and how we have maintained/practiced that View primarily while we are making our way towards each culmination of past actions. The Mani mantra is always a dependable friend at each crossroad we come upon. 


Edited by C T, 01 January 2015 - 03:13 AM.

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Om svabhava shuddha sarva dharma svabhava shuddho 'ham!
Om shunyata jnana vajra svabhava atmako 'ham! 
Om ah hum hra phat!
Om muni muni mahamuni Shakyamuniye svaha! 
  
Appearances are mind, mind is emptiness, emptiness is spontaneous presence, spontaneous presence is self-liberation.
(9th Karmapa)
 

The objects perceived by sentient beings 

are like the appearance of illusions;

Sentient beings themselves are in the nature of illusion

they all arise through dependent origination. - Nagarjuna


#13 C T

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Posted 01 January 2015 - 03:26 AM

The famous Tibetan practitioner Milarepa wrote an amazingly 'simple' summary of the six perfections:

For generosity, nothing to do,
Other than stop fixating on self.

 

For morality, nothing to do,
Other than stop being dishonest.

 

For patience, nothing to do,
Other than not fear what is ultimately true.

 

For effort, nothing to do,
Other than practise continuously.

 

For meditative stability, nothing to do,
Other than rest in presence.

 

For wisdom, nothing to do,
Other than know directly how things are.


Edited by C T, 01 January 2015 - 03:26 AM.

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Om svabhava shuddha sarva dharma svabhava shuddho 'ham!
Om shunyata jnana vajra svabhava atmako 'ham! 
Om ah hum hra phat!
Om muni muni mahamuni Shakyamuniye svaha! 
  
Appearances are mind, mind is emptiness, emptiness is spontaneous presence, spontaneous presence is self-liberation.
(9th Karmapa)
 

The objects perceived by sentient beings 

are like the appearance of illusions;

Sentient beings themselves are in the nature of illusion

they all arise through dependent origination. - Nagarjuna


#14 bubbles

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Posted 01 January 2015 - 03:32 AM

Thank you CT for your posts. They are awesome.


bubbles

Walk your talk or close your mouth.
Don't whine, just do your best.
Chi Kung for health : Flying Phoenix Celestial Healing Chi Kung of Ehrmeishan

#15 C T

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Posted 01 January 2015 - 03:48 AM

Thank you CT for your posts. They are awesome.

You are awesome, Bubbles. _/º\_

 

:)


Om svabhava shuddha sarva dharma svabhava shuddho 'ham!
Om shunyata jnana vajra svabhava atmako 'ham! 
Om ah hum hra phat!
Om muni muni mahamuni Shakyamuniye svaha! 
  
Appearances are mind, mind is emptiness, emptiness is spontaneous presence, spontaneous presence is self-liberation.
(9th Karmapa)
 

The objects perceived by sentient beings 

are like the appearance of illusions;

Sentient beings themselves are in the nature of illusion

they all arise through dependent origination. - Nagarjuna


#16 bubbles

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Posted 01 January 2015 - 08:57 AM

You are awesome, Bubbles. _/º\_

 

:)

 

Thank you CT, but I can't take your words in. I am just a crooked frog.

 

To me you are among the best members of TTB.

 

Your above posts are most needed in the boards. It is not just their content but also the perfume that wraps them.

 

_/°\_

 

:)

 

edited the 2nd sentence for clarity


Edited by bubbles, 01 January 2015 - 12:22 PM.

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bubbles

Walk your talk or close your mouth.
Don't whine, just do your best.
Chi Kung for health : Flying Phoenix Celestial Healing Chi Kung of Ehrmeishan




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