exorcist_1699

Confucian Qi gong

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Same as Taoist and Buddhist qi gong , Confucian qi gong is another important school in the Chinese tradition . Instead of starting from emptiness (Buddhist ) or jing (Taoist ), the Confucians starts from morals. Capable of transforming people's moral drive ( e.g, courage to rescue the people in danger , the determination to stand out and criticize all those evils...etc ,) into qi , hold it and expand it , is the main characteristics of the Confucian way.

 

The upgrade of your moral level will enhance the power of your qi ; a good man is also a very powerful man .

 

What in the West is only handled by philosophy and religion , and, always entangled by those philosophical and theological reasoning , morals , when being put in the hands of the Confucians , are used for initiating qi .

Edited by exorcist_1699
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It is said that people who are anxious to change the world, to make our society better , are more likely to adopt the Confucian qi gong .

 

People who are zealous to grasp their personal relation with this universe , to accomplish some thing great in

the universe , likely incline to the Taoist qi gong .

Edited by exorcist_1699
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Qi is the source of moral courage , such saying sounds strange to many people. But in China , Hong Kong and Taiwan , nearly all literate people know and read the " Song of the Righteous Qi" , (正氣歌)which advocates such a kind of theory. ( in fact, the Song is one of the most read articles in Chinese culture )


More strangely is that this moral courage , with some modifications ,can be changed into an unseen shield safeguarding us from many diseases and as a means of reversing aging...

It is nothing odd if we remember that yang qi is also having the characteristics of making us fearless, tough and aggressive .

Edited by exorcist_1699
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Wang Yang-ming (王陽明) , the most important Ming-Dynasty Confucian thinker who combines Confucianism with Buddhism , is not only famous and influential in China, but also in Japan and Korean, yet nearly unknown to the Western Taoist circle , which sounds a little strange to me . Just like the " Pre-Celestial School" is the intersection of Taoism and Zen , the " Yang-Ming theory" is the intersection of the Confucianism and Zen . Wang is not only famous for his thought, but his success in battlefields, which benefits from his psychic ability; it is said that :

 

" 至誠可以前知" ( " Utmost sincerity gives rise to the power of foretelling" )

 

Contrary to what most of the people in the West believe , it is a virtuous condensed Mind that opens our 3rd eye , not visualization...

Edited by exorcist_1699
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Wang Yang-ming (王陽明) , the most important Ming-Dynasty Confucian thinker who combines Confucianism with Buddhism , is not only famous and influential in China, but also in Japan and Korean, yet nearly unknown to the Western Taoist circle , which sounds a little strange to me . Just like the " Pre-Celestial School" is the intersection of Taoism and Zen , the " Yang-Ming theory" is the intersection of the Confucianism and Zen . Wang is not only famous for his thought, but his success in battlefields, which benefits from his psychic ability; it is said that :

 

" 至誠可以前知" ( " Utmost sincerity gives rise to the power of foretelling" )

 

Contrary to what most of the people in the West believe , it is a virtuous condensed Mind that opens our 3rd eye , not visualization...

 

 

Yes!

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Actually, pretty well all genuine spiritual or cultivation systems including buddhism, taoism, and various religions and practices from all over the world all place strong emphasis on high morality and virtue. This however is often overlooked or deliberately ignored in modern times by many people, but it really is the foundation of most true spiritual and cultivation systems. Without a strong moral or ethical foundation, cultivation practices such as meditation, qigong, chanting, ceremonies, prayer, rituals, etc., become weak or distorted or empty. This missing foundation is the 'te' that is described in much detail in the tao te ching. People who do not first build a strong foundation of morality/virtue/te and who practice spiritual or cultivation practices either do not get much beyond health improvement, or they may even develop mental and emotional imbalances or health issues, and that sort of thing. You can see many of the so called spiritual and cultivation practices these days have become quite distorted, with emphasis on me, myself, and I, and many pretty much ignore the true and essential foundation of the original systems. Pointing this out seems to make little to no difference for the most part however. Many people seem very uninterested in such things these days. The ego and imagination rules supreme in these times. Me, myself, and I and the almighty dollar is the new 'cultivation' system. Meanwhile the Earth and all life upon it is under great stress and risk.

Edited by Iskote
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When people , especially the Americans (?) , hear Confucian , the first thing they think of is those harsh Asian mothers who ,with a bat in hands, enforce their children to get full mark in every subject of their schooling so as to honour the family , yet smothering their creativity.. etc; such an interpretation of Confucian culture can only be partly true.


For Qigong practitioners, after having accumulated certain amount of qi in their bodies, likely will view such demanding requests on conduct and self-control from another perspective . In fact, the more qi they save in their bodies, the more they know why they have to follow very strict discipline : not to have sex freely , not to get angry in any way, avoid eating spicy food, never drink too much water before sleep , even when to piss should be carefully planned...etc . And , violating some discipline , say getting angry at whatever reason, is now no longer an issue of delaying progress or being misbehaved , but an issue of life-and- death ( at certain stage , getting angry can be more fatal than having jing leaked ) ..

Edited by exorcist_1699
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exorcist_1699,

 

Thank you for starting this thread. I have often thought of doing so myself, but have never found the time. I think it is important to emphasis the importance of Zhuxi and his selection of the 'Four Books' as the core hermeneutic circle/cycle from which the type of understanding which is demonstrated by Wang Yabgming grows.

 

 

Wang Yang-ming (王陽明) , the most important Ming-Dynasty Confucian thinker who combines Confucianism with Buddhism , is not only famous and influential in China, but also in Japan and Korean, yet nearly unknown to the Western Taoist circle , which sounds a little strange to me . Just like the " Pre-Celestial School" is the intersection of Taoism and Zen , the " Yang-Ming theory" is the intersection of the Confucianism and Zen . Wang is not only famous for his thought, but his success in battlefields, which benefits from his psychic ability; it is said that :

 

" 至誠可以前知" ( " Utmost sincerity gives rise to the power of foretelling" )

 

Contrary to what most of the people in the West believe , it is a virtuous condensed Mind that opens our 3rd eye , not visualization...

 

Your quote comes from the Zhonyong, the 'Doctrine of the Mean', one of the Four Books from which I took my Tao Bums name.

 

People who are not familiar with him can read about Zhuxi here:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zhu_Xi

 

If I find time I will write more.

 

Final note, as an American, whenever I bring up Confucianism I am immediately reminded about bound feet and the evils of Patriarchy gone wild in China, supposedly all due to the evils of Confucianism. From there it is very much an uphill battle.

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Qi is the source of moral courage , such saying sounds strange to many people. But in China , Hong Kong and Taiwan , nearly all literate people know and read the " Song of the Righteous Qi" , (正氣歌)which advocates such a kind of theory. ( in fact, the Song is one of the most read articles in Chinese culture )

 

More strangely is that this moral courage , with some modifications ,can be changed into an unseen shield safeguarding us from many diseases and as a means of reversing aging...

 

It is nothing odd if we remember that yang qi is also having the characteristics of making us fearless, tough and aggressive .

 

 

 

Most people misunderstood the term: 正氣 in 正氣歌.

正氣 is a compound character term which means "righteousness" not "righteous chi". The two characters should not be translated separately because the "chi" was comprised in the meaning of "righteousness".

 

The proper interpretation for 正氣歌 is the "song of righteousness" instead of the "song of right chi".

 

 

PS.....

I think this twisted misinterpretation was derived from some of the native speakers too.

Edited by ChiDragon

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Most people misunderstood the term: 正氣 in 正氣歌.

正氣 is a compound character term which means "righteousness" not "righteous chi". The two characters should not be translated separately because the "chi" was comprised in the meaning of "righteousness".

The proper interpretation for 正氣歌 is the "song of righteousness" instead of the "song of right chi".

PS.....

I think this twisted misinterpretation was derived from some of the native speakers too.

正氣 (Zhèngqì) right or upright qi.
Holy Quran (1:6) Guide us to the straight path (Ihdinas sırâtel mustakîm)
The meaning of Zhèngqì and sıratel mustakim (right way) seems to be inter related. Both have the meaning of "right, straight".
I am speculating, may be I am wrong, but is this Confucian Qigong promoting Zhèngqì such that who practices this art be Zhèng or right or sırâtel mustakîm?
Very interesting topic.

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正氣 (Zhèngqì) right or upright qi.
Holy Quran (1:6) Guide us to the straight path (Ihdinas sırâtel mustakîm)
The meaning of Zhèngqì and sıratel mustakim (right way) seems to be inter related. Both have the meaning of "right, straight".
I am speculating, may be I am wrong, but is this Confucian Qigong promoting Zhèngqì such that who practices this art be Zhèng or right or sırâtel mustakîm?
Very interesting topic.

 

Yes, the term 正氣 (Zhèngqì) stand alone by itself means the "genuine chi". However, 正氣 in name of the song of 正氣歌 means "righteousness" but not in a form of "chi". Some people were mix crossed the meanings of the terms.

 

 

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The Confucian are smart in the way how they write things.

The sentence are built in the way one can the more

one know have access to more information.

 

On the surface one has the "righteousness"

and deeper the righteousness Qi.

Actually as I have know until now a translation

into another language from chinese will kill

the wordplay and so the hidden meaning

which I think is essential for Confucianism.

 

Crazy enough, something like rightenous Qi

seem to exist. If one do believe in information

based energy. The question is the definition

of what is rightenous. Same as things have

frequency, Qi has the same. Things like

Anger, fear, envy, have their frequency so

it seems.

 

I recall I had a sentence where one word

was translated as "form" into german, which

sentence I can not recall clearly:

 

"Those who not master the form will never

attain mastership"

 

I had did look about form in chinese which is

about jing as form in the physical.

Now if you look jing can be also the

one in Jing- Qi -Shen which would be energetics,

next would be Jing as shadow,

I would dare to say to work on ones shadow.

 

If I see that the approach of

Confucianism as Scholarism using

intellect playing with words or better

known as chinese humor

using same sounding words

and replace them (oh if you know

how a normal sentence can turn

to pevert one.... ^_^ )

But the Confuciansm has rules

which say which words to choose

from the amount of words.

So improper meaning are out.

 

It is like Матрёшка (Matryoshka).

Confucius is using one sentence to

express many things in the same time,

obvious and hidden.

 

Most intrigueing is about the Wu Wei

It is said that Confucius understand

it a to "not interfere". (So I get it from Eva Wong)

Telling me that he has attain his own

understanding.

 

 

Which means

the Confucian Qigong know

about spontaneus movement

and somewhere hidden may

still transfer energetics to reach Tao.

An assumption from me which should

lead to a deeper digging.

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Yes, the term 正氣 (Zhèngqì) stand alone by itself means the "genuine chi". However, 正氣 in name of the song of 正氣歌 means "righteousness" but not in a form of "chi". Some people were mix crossed the meanings of the terms.

 

As far as I know, 正氣 (Zhèngqì) is used in some Qigongs and it is upright and erect like human spine, the terms straight, upright, are more suitable for 正氣 (Zhèngqì) rather than "genuine qi"

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As far as I know, 正氣 (Zhèngqì) is used in some Qigongs and it is upright and erect like human spine, the terms straight, upright, are more suitable for 正氣 (Zhèngqì) rather than "genuine qi"

 

Okay, that's fine. Just be sure that the "genuine chi" goes "upright" to the human spine...... :)

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Okay, that's fine. Just be sure that the "genuine chi" goes "upright" to the human spine...... :)

 

Thank you, but what is important is effect of this Zhèngqì, if it is exercised correctly, does it make the practioner Zhèng?

 

 

Okay, that's fine. Just be sure that the "genuine chi" goes "upright" to the human spine...... :)

 

I am glad that we agreed upon one thing. :)

 

The important point is the effect of this Zhèngqì, if it is exercised correctly, does it make the practioner Zhèng?

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exorcist_1699,

 

Thank you for starting this thread. I have often thought of doing so myself, but have never found the time. I think it is important to emphasis the importance of Zhuxi and his selection of the 'Four Books' as the core hermeneutic circle/cycle from which the type of understanding which is demonstrated by Wang Yabgming grows.

 

 

Your quote comes from the Zhonyong, the 'Doctrine of the Mean', one of the Four Books from which I took my Tao Bums name.

 

People who are not familiar with him can read about Zhuxi here:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zhu_Xi

 

If I find time I will write more.

 

Final note, as an American, whenever I bring up Confucianism I am immediately reminded about bound feet and the evils of Patriarchy gone wild in China, supposedly all due to the evils of Confucianism. From there it is very much an uphill battle.

 

 

Thank you for pointing out the source of my quotation.

I expect to read more from you ...

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Same as Taoist and Buddhist qi gong , Confucian qi gong is another important school in the Chinese tradition . Instead of starting from emptiness (Buddhist ) or jing (Taoist ), the Confucians starts from morals. Capable of transforming people's moral drive ( e.g, courage to rescue the people in danger , the determination to stand out and criticize all those evils...etc ,) into qi , hold it and expand it , is the main characteristics of the Confucian way.

The upgrade of your moral level will enhance the power of your qi ; a good man is also a very powerful man .

What in the West is only handled by philosophy and religion , and, always entangled by those philosophical and theological reasoning , morals , when being put in the hands of the Confucians , are used for initiating qi .

 

Dear Exorcist_1699,

 

Are there schools of Confucian Qi Gong? Could you give us some brief information about those schools, masters and/or lineages? I am asking in order to understand.

 

Thanking in advance for your kind reply.

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Dear Exorcist_1699,

 

Are there schools of Confucian Qi Gong? Could you give us some brief information about those schools, masters and/or lineages? I am asking in order to understand.

 

Thanking in advance for your kind reply.

 

I have never heard of such thing as Confucian Qi Gong but I will hear somebody else's input......!!!

Edited by ChiDragon

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I have never heard of such thing as Confucian Qi Gong but I will hear somebody else's input......!!!

 

In The Art of Chi Kung by Wong Kiew Kit (Element Books, 1993) there is a short section on Confucian "Chi Kung". Chapter Sixteen, 'Improving Academic Performance Through Chi Kung', he cites in particular Mecnius, about whom you can read here:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mencius

 

And Shao Yong, one of the founders of so-called Neo-Confucianism, about whom you can read here:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shao_Yong

 

The Confucians are very subtle about about their mind training techniques, but it is obvious reading the Mengzi that Mencius had a profound insight into qigong and even more importantly shengong.

 

I don't have time to expand on this now, but it was reading about Mencius and the Zhongyong in Tu Wei-ming's Humanity and Self-Cultivation (Asian Humanities Press, Berkeley, 1979) in late 2000 that lead me to understand the value of Confucianism. Before that, like many Westerners I had no idea of how profound a teaching it was and is.

 

You can read about Tu Weiming here:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tu_Weiming

 

I will post more as time allows.

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In The Art of Chi Kung by Wong Kiew Kit (Element Books, 1993) there is a short section on Confucian "Chi Kung". Chapter Sixteen, 'Improving Academic Performance Through Chi Kung', he cites in particular Mecnius, about whom you can read here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mencius

And Shao Yong, one of the founders of so-called Neo-Confucianism, about whom you can read here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shao_Yong

The Confucians are very subtle about about their mind training techniques, but it is obvious reading the Mengzi that Mencius had a profound insight into qigong and even more importantly shengong.

I don't have time to expand on this now, but it was reading about Mencius and the Zhongyong in Tu Wei-ming's Humanity and Self-Cultivation (Asian Humanities Press, Berkeley, 1979) in late 2000 that lead me to understand the value of Confucianism. Before that, like many Westerners I had no idea of how profound a teaching it was and is.

You can read about Tu Weiming here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tu_Weiming

I will post more as time allows.

 

Thank you Zhongyongdaoist. From your information, I perceive that there are/were/should be some Confucian Qi Gong schools or at least some techniques of Confucian Qi Gong are still practiced by other Qi Gong Schools (Daoist, Buddhist, etc.) May be the Confucian Qi Gong schools are not known by public but they still exist today?

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When I was worried about how to answer Isimsiz Biri and ChiDragon, Zhongyongdaoist came out and rescued me; at least , he answered part of the questions; ChiDragon's is very easy to reply, which only shows how little he know about the topic , Isimsiz's is a little tricky... and need little more time...

Edited by exorcist_1699

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.... ChiDragon's is very easy to reply, which only shows how little he know about the topic , .....

 

I have no knowledge of it at all due to there was no information in the native sources.

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When I was worried about how to answer Isimsiz Biri and ChiDragon, Zhongyongdaoist came out and rescued me; at least , he answered part of the questions; ChiDragon's is very easy to reply, which only shows how little he know about the topic , Isimsiz's is a little tricky... and need little more time...

 

Dear Exorcist_1699,

 

I am not posting in other threads (except a thread about Jim McMillan and I deeply regret posting there) but your thread has opened a new horizon in my evaluation of qigong, Chinese history and culture. Please take your time, we are looking forward to your reply. Zhongyongdaoist also contributed to subject in a very good way. I am happy to meet both of you and also ChiDragon as he is honest and open to learn.

 

Best Regards,

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