2ndchance

"?Military?" Exercises for Normal Open-Eye Mindfulness ?Concentration? to Achieve Samadhi

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Posted (edited)

Ever since Buddha Boy Ram Bahadur Bomjon Palden Dorje created controversial news about meditating for 3 years plus with no food & no water to sustain him and no showers to keep him clean from diseases and filth, I have been obsessed with closed-eye sitting meditations in order to emulate his path to samadhi.

 

However, every time I close my eyes while sitting down to meditate deeply, my body and my head will shake violently aka kundalini syndromes which will snap me out of deep concentrations. It is extremely hard to concentrate in that manner.

 

Then I tried open eye meditation on a candle flame in a buddhist temple a couple of weeks ago. Wonders! I experience a type of mini samadhi mode where everything in my field of visions start to "glow" a bit. 

 

Nowadays, I am trying to be as mindful as possible in my actions in my thoughts every second of the day. I am trying to push the state of mindfulness into a state of deep concentration while having my eyes open doing my everyday activities.. walking, eating, showering, talking, listening, watching the TV, reading, typing on the keyboard, etc..

 

https://www.speakingtree.in/allslides/how-to-attain-samadhi/117906

Complete Absorption

Swami Sivananda describes samadhi as a state where the mind is completely absorbed in the object of one's meditation, even if it's the sound of Om. The mind identifies itself with the object of meditation. He says that a real samadhi is one where there is neither a dhyana (meditation) nor dhyata (meditator). It is a state where the meditator and the meditated, the thinker and the thought, the worshipper and the worshipped, become one, become identical...

 

A teacher once told me he had to practice concentration by using chopsticks to pick up beans from one container to another container slowly with the upmost concentration.

 

Another teacher also once revealed another open exercise where he has to use an ink brush or a pen to write the words "om mani padme hum" on a piece of paper talisman with deep concentration to channel his chi and power into the paper talisman.

 

Hmmm, as I am typing this with some concentration, I am beginning to experience a type of mild concentration contented concentration. LOL.

 

Okay my question to all especially spiritual martial artists out there what kind of open-eye mindfulness concentration exercises do you do in order to achieve complete absorption on "moving objects" or on "movements" or on "your field of vision".

 

Michael Jordan once said he was frequently in the zone which I thought to be in a state of martial arts moving samadhi?

 

I am wondering how bodyguards and special forces train their minds to be most concentratively most mindfully most open-eye aware of their surroundings all the time.

 

I am wondering if this is similar to the "Be Present" methods of Eckhart Tolle?

 

Looking forward to you advice on open eye focussed awareness on anything and everything.

 

Thank you.

Edited by 2ndchance

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I am thinking to myself how do the old ninja warriors of japan train their awareness of their surroundings while in enemy territory.

 

If they are aware of their surroundings using all their senses, then is it possible to focus 100% or more on all of their surroundings using all of their senses? 

 

If this is possible, then is this focus or concentration on all of their surroundings using all of their senses possible to achieve samadhi?

 

Isn't this complete absorption on your surroundings on your environment?

 

Any ninjas or martial artists or even bodyguards special forces please advise a noob here.

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How possible is it to achieve complete absorption on reading books? To me, that seems to be one of the hardest thing possible.

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Posted (edited)

Situational Awareness

In military-speak, situational awareness is defined as the ability to identify, process, and comprehend the critical elements of information about what is happening to the team with regard to a mission. More simply, it's being aware of what is going on around you.

 

Because I know the importance of situational awareness during battle, I must admit I get annoyed by the vast number of people who go about their lives without paying even the faintest attention to where they are or what's happening around them. It puts them and the general security of society at risk. These are the very people who most often get victimized or end up on the casualty list. The next time you go to a crowded shopping mall or airport, you will be amazed to observe how many people seem to be oblivious to their environment, insulated in their own world. As we will see, airports and malls, in particular, are two places where you should be absolutely vigilant and aware of your surroundings.

 

So is it possible to achieve samadhi by deep concentrating on situational awareness on awareness of all your environments all your surroundings?

 

Has Anyone tried it before?

 

Please share your experiences.

Edited by 2ndchance

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Put your mind on autopilot.

To ensure the success of their mission and the safety of their team, Special Forces need to be constantly in the present, even in the most trying situations. The best way to do this is to “switch” your mind to autopilot, focusing intently on the present and only the present. Don’t be concerned with what happened in the past or what the future could bring — you must live exclusively in the present. Focus on your surroundings, doing your job well, helping your team, and let go of everything you can’t control. Going on autopilot will help you succeed, regardless of the nature of the challenge in front of you.

 

This sounds a lot like buddhist teachings.

 

Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment.

 

The secret of health for both mind and body is not to mourn for the past, not to worry about the future, not to anticipate the future, but to live the present moment wisely and earnestly.

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HOW NAVY SEALS CONQUER FEAR AND ANXIETY

 
 
ODA525.jpg
31JUL
2017 

The training kicks in.

Take a second to think about what made you stressed or anxious last week. Deadlines, traffic, a long grocery line, or some social situations are everyday trivial stressors, but your brain’s amygdala processes them as life-or-death threats.

Stress just means resistance or pressure. We need stress to grow as humans; it can be a positive force if mentally framed correctly — even enhancing performance to blast through a deadline. But prolonged stress erodes your performance and wellbeing.

Through my long history as an elite athlete, martial artist, yogi, and Navy SEAL, I teach people how to conquer fear and anxiety, and help veterans with post-traumatic stress.

 

Here are six ways I learned how SEALs starve fear and feed courage:

 

1. Positive self-talk.
SEALs are trained to be rock steady, but when I checked into initial SEAL training, BUD/S Class 170, my nerves were sizzling. Adrenaline pulsed through my arteries. My class of 180 trainees had a stream of negative chatter in their minds expressed as anxiety riddling their faces. A sign on the wall said, “The Only Easy Day Was Yesterday.”

I paused and said to myself: “I’ve trained hard and made it this far. Many have gone before me and survived — if they did it, so can I. Quitting is not an option. They’ll have to kill me to quit. Just focus on performing right now.” This perspective melted my fear to be replaced by the firepower of courage.

 

2. A “Why” or purpose.
Two hours into the first day of training, trainees were already quitting. While doing push-ups in the surf, my buddy Bush — who’d outperformed me throughout Officer Candidate School — said, “Mark, I can’t do this,” and also quit. I later discovered that he wanted to be a vet. His “Why” for being a SEAL wasn’t steadfast.

During Hell Week (six days of training with just four hours of sleep), an instructor told me, “You’re capable of twenty times more than you think.” At the end of my nine-month BUD/S class, 19 trainees remained. The workload we endured seemed impossible. But, amazingly, it was. Our “Why” enabled us to tap into our 20X Factor and an uncommon resolve.

SealFit_InContent_5Mountains-1.jpg

 

3. Focus on the immediate threat.
One year later, in the pitch black, my parachute canopy collapsed into a wobbly sheet after a teammate collided with me in mid air. Plummeting towards the earth, I had eight seconds remaining in my 26-year-old life.

Suddenly my training kicked in. My mind, breathing, and time slowed as I felt my way through the malfunction checklist. Suddenly my reserve chute caught enough air before I hit the ground unscathed.

Despite the chaos, a SEAL is trained to focus with single-mindedness on the immediate threat and dispatch one target at a time. Excessive thinking would have killed me. My unconscious competence combined with relentless training saved my life.

 

4. Breathe.
Two hours into my five-hour diving mission, water gushed around my face. I could breathe but was blind. I fumbled through the standard operating procedures to clear the mask but to no avail.

I was useless as a navigator but couldn’t abort the mission. My teammate took over. After my frustration and fear had dissipated, I slowed my breathing and held my breath at the inhale and exhale. I focused my mind on the breathing cycle while repeating the positive mantra, “Feeling good, looking good, ought to be in Hollywood!” thus accelerating my concentration and positivity.

Suddenly we came to a halt. We’d arrived at the destination. A miserable three hours felt like an enjoyable 45 minutes just through focused breathing.

 

5. Visualize success.
When my mentor, Admiral McRaven, led the mission to nail Bin Laden, he had his SEAL Team visualize the mission hundreds of times. They mentally pictured everything that could go wrong, as well as what the victory would look like. They also rehearsed it live in a mock-up of the compound the terrorist was holed up in. This tactic is a key to SEAL success.

SEAL’s don’t take anything for granted and ensure that they win in their minds before stepping onto the helo. The SEAL Platoon will “dirt dive” a mission to visualize every part of a mission before executing it. Visualization focuses their mind on what they can control and identify challenges. It inoculates fear because they’ve replayed all the scenarios, yet are highly trained to adapt to unforeseen events. When things inevitably go wrong and fatigue kicks in, they fall back on their visualization and training.

 

6. Quitting is not an option.
As a retiring SEAL, I wanted to give civilians or special operations candidates a taste of the training I’d experienced.

49 hours and 45 minutes into Kokoro camp — a 50+ hour crucible modeled on the SEAL Hell Week — we turned up the heat to see how trainees would withstand the pressure. After convincing the trainees that several hours remained, one quit. Moments later, the class was secured, and he was left dumbfounded.

The SEAL ethos makes quitting not an option. SEALs persevere to “find a way or make one.” Things inevitably go wrong, but they don’t entertain the concept of failure. In high stakes situations, quitting means mission failure, even death.

 

To conclude: developing a warrior mindset makes you approach life’s challenges differently. You’ll face them head on, keep goals short, but stay focused and relaxed, adapting to the changing situation. You’ll look to find humor in the challenge and tap into your 20X potential. You’ll know that you will succeed — with the right training, there will be no wondering.

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Posted (edited)

Just wondering how well would Special Forces soldiers do well in meditation training? 

 

Is "Focus" alone sufficient to achieve Samadhi?


Please share your teachings?!

Edited by 2ndchance

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Have trained in military in some of the same types of courses they go through

although maybe not as demanding....

 

Also have worked with and supported SF groups

as well as other similar types of soldiers by other Armies. 

 

Working with weapons that can kill others and your self if not handled 

correctly tends to get ones attention real quick.

 

Pushing ones body  passed its limits to survive

also is a real attention getter.

 

The attrition rate for such courses is quite high

 

"Just wondering how well would Special Forces soldiers do well in meditation training? "

 

It might be said that their training is "meditation"  in action.  

meditation is sometimes referred to as the gate less ,  gate.

 

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, 2ndchance said:

I have been obsessed with closed-eye sitting meditations in order to emulate his path to samadhi.

 

Rock / mountain,  climbing is very meditative if one is not into the military.

It will force one to be very attentive, focused  and test ones limits.

 

Of course the downside if one cant manage it,  the fall from a mountain is much longer then the fall 

from one in seated meditation if they happen to fall asleep.   

One may not get the chance to try again,,,nor need to...

Edited by windwalker
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Ok.. I know I am repeating my question here But I like to pose my question in another way..

 

Because I like to know if a samurai or a ninja can achieve samadhi by practicing Zanshin?

 

So if a martial artists keep relaxed concentration focus on martial arts moves, he can achieve Samadhi?


Cos to the best of my knowledge, Samadhi can only be achieved by concentrating on stationary objects or stationary movements?

 

I like your advise on this matter.

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Rock climbing, I was watching this dude climb ropeless, it's crazy 

 

 

I was wondering, for the people who can sense energy stuff and shiz, how does the different sports affect energy, etc

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Posted (edited)
On 3/8/2019 at 7:51 AM, 2ndchance said:

 

I am wondering how bodyguards and special forces train their minds to be most concentratively most mindfully most open-eye aware of their surroundings all the time.

 

They are simply for good purpose. For something they believe in that is what they love. That gives them power to fight through the pain. They have the guiding light of love in order to explore and move through the darkness.

 

For example, fighting to save the innocent. Or help the innocent who you know are good and thus deserving of your aid, thus there is a destiny or energy of assistance that is the path of least resistance you ride on that wave, and thus you become a mediator for their receiving of the blessing that comes not primarily from you but from universal forces. You train to become a better conductive tool for the good force of the universe so to speak.

 

If you know that good will prevail, you become a hand of good force. So you don't take credit for the bad blows you make unto your enemy. It is only ever the enemy that summons this disgrace upon themselves by their actions and deeds.

 

You cannot think about this, the way that atoms are weighed on scales by god, in order for infinite intelligence to calculate the path of least resistance, on the highest frequency band with of consciousness, in order for all your inter relationship interactions to be of perfect alignment at all times, you have to be in full submittion and devotion to become a hand of the good powerful will of your own soul's greater knowing and wisdom and intentions for all the well-being of you, and all those around you, and of all the entire universe.

Edited by Everything

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5 hours ago, Everything said:

They are simply for good purpose. For something they believe in that is what they love. That gives them power to fight through the pain. They have the guiding light of love in order to explore and move through the darkness.

So they might not be gun-toting violence-romancing aggressive bastards who push themselves for their own egos sake? 

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7 hours ago, Mudfoot said:

So they might not be gun-toting violence-romancing aggressive bastards who push themselves for their own egos sake? 

On that level, what you're referring to does not even exist. You can try and explain that in words, but they have nothing to do with the higher truth of who these beings truely are. So these people would be completely naked and transparant, harmless, loved and fully allowed their own creation, even if it is one that doesn't serve themselves. Because there's no rush to grow or mature. It's all part of the journey. And since we're all eternal, you can't get wrong, and you wont get it done. So enjoy the journey, that's what it's for.

 

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I bet that special forces all over the world will use that in their recruitment posters. 

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Posted (edited)

Juggling, even the simple 3 ball pattern, tends to put me into a trance state, ie the concentration and repetition keeps extraneous thoughts away. 

 

There are some weapon katas, staff and bokken, that can be looped.  Done for 20, 30 minutes + they also tend to put you into a trance state.

Edited by thelerner

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