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There is much interest on this forum in Daoism as it has been passed down under the umbrella of the Complete Reality tradition, especially by its major branch, the Dragon Gate.

 

Most people here are familiar with the Dao De Jing but may not be aware that when Wang Chongyang founded Complete Reality Daoism, he chose two other pieces of writing to round out the foundation of his school's worldview. One is the Mahayana Buddhist Heart Sutra, and the other is the Confucian Classic of Xiào. Qiu Chuji, founder of the Dragon Gate lineage of Complete Reality Daoism, continued the tradition his master began. There is far more discussion online and in books of the various physical and spiritual cultivation techniques associated with the Dragon Gate lineage than there is of its philosophy. However, studying and embodying the philosophical basis of Complete Reality teachings is of tremendous, indispensible value to the practitioner.

 

Familiarizing oneself with Classic of Xiào is a good way to understand the comportment considered befitting a student of Dao. It is also a way to realize that the commonplace Western notion of Confucianism and Daoism being wholly distinct if not downright opposed ways of life was not accurate in history nor in the ways of thinking of living holders of the Daoist tradition. Applying teachings on xiào can bring great harmony to one's inner being, one's family, one's community, and, in the ideal world, to nations if not the entire globe. The latter possibility is of course not likely to manifest, and it is not a goal Daoists strive for. However, Daoists realize deeply that the benefits of cultivating real virtue are not merely temporal; rather, the benefits are understood to influence the outcomes of alchemical practice.

 

I have attached a translation of this short text to this thread; other English versions can be easily found online.

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Yes, Quanzhen is known for uniting the ideas of Daoism, Buddhism and Confucianism, so one needs to know all these teachings to understand Quanzhen tradition.

Also, thanks for the translation.

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Thank you for posting this. I would like very much to see many more like this around.

 

Btw, I would have to disagree that Daoists don`t take interest in the political well being of the globe. Perhaps not using the tools of political office, but influencing the hearts and minds toward De for the betterment of humanity, they are surely interested, as evidenced by extensive writings on bringing harmony amongst the populace.

 

Though you did say "strive for." Perhaps this is true, though they should..

Edited by Harmonious Emptiness

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Yes, I was very specific in choosing the word "strive." Knowing when to stop and making one's contribution to the world without attachment to outcomes is important.

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Thank you for this.

Much of this resonates deeply with me.

 

An essence of the web of life is conveyed here, where every part depends on every other part.

Also the importance of maintaining the stability of an established foundation.

 

Both these principles struggle to find foothold in the cultures I've been exposed to growing up and living in the United States. I see us plunder the earth and each other, constantly stripping away what holds the delicate balance of our foundation together. Usually the reason is related to the choice of instant as opposed to delayed gratification.

 

Why wait for him, let's just go! Why save up for that, put it on credit! Why deal with congress to pass new legislation when we can exploit this loophole now? Why spend millions on new sewers when we can dump this industrial waste where no one will see it?

 

Aeons of the creation of heaven and earth bless us with such abundance, and in our greed we are blind to the effects of this plundering.

 

Though, these affects seem so clearly present simply in how we live our lives - full of ego, lack of respect, heart locked away behind ten thousand defenses.

 

-----------------------------

 

It is interesting though.... the tao works in all things after all.

This lack of foundation we have is really shaking things up, and in some ways really levels the playing field for new innovations, which often arise from unique circumstances that did not begin with a stable foundation.

 

I sense major changes are occurring in the evolution of humanity, as globalization continues on and on, and that a new foundation is being reforged which will support what these changes are brining.

 

Throughout all this, I feel the principles taught in this classic are of utmost importance. And yet there are definitely conditions I have seen and experienced where the definitions of "unrighteous conduct" are difficult to define, due to the many unique situations which abound. Remonstrances might be appropriate from one person's perspective, but not from another's, and who is to judge? This classic seems to stress specific acts of righteousness, while the tao seems to rest righteousness on the social harmony appropriate for the particular situation.

 

Never the less, even as I struggle to maintain equanimity under the challenges my family brings, I still do find it critically important to respect and love my family, and do what I can to share what is most harmonious with them. For myself, and for others I know, this is among the most challenging tasks we have ever faced, and, at times the most harmonious path is separation.

 

Separation from my family is a struggle for me. Once the tao very clearly lead me to a teacher who taught me how violent oppression in family circumstances must be dealt with by completely separating and severing from these family members until one achieves one's self. Teachings in the tao seem to indicate the tao may be walked in any circumstance - often the more oppressive, the more developmental.

 

I needed to read this, and feel humbled.

Thank you.

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Interesting! I didn't know Confucianism was mystical in any way. I thought it was basically a moral/ethical system. I'll have to read this. :3

 

EDIT: Ah, I see that you mentioned this in your first post. I'll take a look anyway, haha.

Edited by Kajenx

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