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Neiye - Section 6 - The Inner Grasp

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Section 6: The Inner Grasp

 

Eno

 

If the form is not balanced, the force of virtue will not come.
If the center is not tranquil, the heart will not be regulated.
When a balanced form controls the force of virtue
then the ren of heaven and the righteousness of earth
will come spontaneously as a torrent.

 

The polar limit of spirit-like brilliance shines in the understanding.
The central rightness of the world of things is flawlessly preserved.
Not letting things disrupt the senses;
not letting the senses disrupt the heart –
such is called inner grasping.

 

Linnell

 

形 不 正 If the form [of the heart/mind] is not properly aligned,
德 不 來 De will not arrive.
中 不 靜 If the center is not still,
心 不 治 The heart/mind will not be regulated.
正 形 攝 德 When the properly aligned form takes in De,
天 仁 地 義 The kindness of heaven and the righteousness of earth
則 淫 然 而 自 至 Then naturally arrive, and overwhelmingly.

 

神 明 之 極 This highest of spirit-like understanding
照 乎 Is it illuminating?
知 萬 物 You will understand the ten thousand creatures.
中 義 守 不 忒 Maintain the righteousness of the center, and you will not err :
不 以 物 亂 官 Do not allow creatures to confuse your senses,
不 以 官 亂 心 Do not allow the senses to confuse your heart/mind.
是 謂 中 得 This is called attaining the center.

 

Roth

 

-- Section 11 --
1. When your body is not aligned,
2. The inner power will not come.
3. When you are not tranquil within,
4. Your mind will not be ordered.
5. Align your body, assist the inner power,
6. Then it will gradually come on its own.
-- Section 12 --
1. The numinous [mind]: no one knows its limit;
2. It intuitively knows the myriad things.
3. Hold it within you, do not let it waver.
4. To not disrupt your senses with external things,
5. To not disrupt your mind with your senses:
6. This is called "grasping it within you."


Shazi Daoren

 

-- Section 11 --
When the body is not aligned,
De will not thrive.
When the center is not calm,
the Heart will not be harnessed.
Align the body, collect De.
Leave to heaven benevolence and to earth justice--
these will naturally thrive on their own.
-- Section 12 --
The Spirit comprehends the Ultimate;
Manifest! It understands the myriad things.
Hold it within your bosom, do not waver.
Do not let external things confuse your faculties;
do not let your faculties confuse your Heart.
This is called 'attaining the center.'

 

 

Yueya:

-- Section 11 --

When your body is not aligned,
The inner power will not arrive.
When the centre lacks stillness,
The heart-mind will not be well-ordered.
Align your body and assist inner power—
Then it will gradually arrive on its own.

-- Section 12 --

The numinous [heart-mind], no one knows its limits;
Its luminosity extends to know the ten thousand things.
Guard it at the centre and do not let it waver.
Do not disturb your senses with external things.
Do not disturb your heart-mind with the senses.
This is called “attaining the Centre.”


Reid

 

122形不正,
When the bodily form is not aligned,
123 德不來。
Virtue does not approach;
124 中不靜,
When the center is not tranquil,
125 心不治。
The heart-mind is not orderly.
126 正形攝德,
When the bodily form is aligned, it absorbs Virtue.
127 天仁地義,
Heaven’s benevolent generosity and Earth’s balancing righteousness
128 則淫然而自至。
Then naturally arrive in abundance.
129 神明之 極,
The ultimate spiritual intelligence –
130 照乎知萬物,
Luminous! It understands the myriad things
131 中義守不忒。
When, in the center, righteousness is guarded without err,
132 不以物亂官,
And things do not disturb the senses,
133 不以官亂心,
Nor do the senses disturb the heart,
134 是謂中得。
This is called inner attainment.

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15 hours ago, dawei said:

形 不 正 If the form [of the heart/mind] is not properly aligned,

this is wrong. the others rendered xing correctly as body

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I find this lines interesting:

 

神 明 之 極 This highest of spirit-like understanding

 

seems most literal.

 

but Reid seems more compact:

The ultimate spiritual intelligence –

 

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This line requires some thought:

 

天 仁 地 義 The kindness of heaven and the righteousness of earth

 

LZ 18 and 38 have an opposite view.    

 

 

大道廢有仁義

When the great Tao declined, The doctrine of humanity and righteousness arose.

 

失仁而後義。
失義而後禮。

The man of superior humanity takes action, but has no ulterior motive to do so. The man of superior righteousness takes action, and has an ulterior motive to do so. 

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So I notice a few don't translate the line I mentioned.   For now, here is how I see it:

 

正 形 攝 德 When the properly aligned form takes in De,
天 仁 地 義 [similarly] The kindness of heaven and the righteousness of earth [forms]
則 淫 然 而 自 至 Then they naturally arrive, and overwhelmingly.

 

 

 

 

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I reviewed all 6 sections together and here is what I get:

 

Summary of key terms:

1: Jing, Qi, De
2: Form, Xin, De
3: Xin, Qi, Dao, Alignment, Form,
4: Alignment, Xin, Jing, Qi, Dao
5: Xin, Qi, Oneness, Regulation, Center, Spirit
6: Alignment, Form [Xin?], De, Center, Spirit

 

 

Section 1:  The Essential Qi

Jing, Qi, De

 

Essence (Jing) of Creatures makes them live.
Qi of citizens can be calmed by De; maintain it and this is developed De.

萬 物 果 得 The bounty of the ten thousand creatures is attained.

 

This line bothers me...  based on 果 - fruit / result / resolute / indeed / if really. Could be:

 

The ten thousand indeed attained (it)) [?, essence, Qi, De] - Reads very similar to Zhuangzi use of attaining
The ten thousand results in attainment [?, essence, Qi, De] - Reads very similar to Zhuangzi use of attaining

 

Reid: And the myriad things attain fruition

 

I find that is the cleverest use of 'fruit' with result.  

 

if I parse a few lines, this seems interesting:

是 故 此 氣 也 Thus this Qi –
而 可 安 以 德 But can be calmed by using De.
而 可 迎 以 意 But can be made welcome by using your intent.
敬 守 勿 失 When you can respectfully* maintain it, and never lose it,
是 謂 成 德 This is called developed De.


Section 2: The Nature of the Heart

Form, Heart, De

 

It starts quite problematic in translation:

凡 心 之 形 Always : the form of the heart/mind is

 

Reid uses the the original of "Xing 刑 punishment/decision” but don't find reason completely satisfying.  I'm not against using it, but is used later and why most make the change.

形 - to appear / to look / form / shape

 

This is later used alone as just a form or shape and often translated as 'body' which seems forced as there is a character for body which most texts would use...  so, this Xing (形) may have a broader use in ancient chinese.  

 

And this can mean the 3-D body and not physical body.

 

Given my Medical Qigong background (which I abandoned a long time ago, in general), I might say this is the 'space' or 'container' and may be the heart or body.

 

This seems the key text:
彼 心 之 情 The nature of that heart/mind
利 安 以 寧 Benefits from calmness and the tranquility that comes from it.

and 
日 用 其 德 You use De daily.

So: Xin is calm by using De

 

Section 3:  The Dao

Xin, Qi, Dao, Alignment, Form

 

Now we hear about Dao as the reason the form (形) is full...

 

but form points back to the heart, body, or 3-D form?

 

Dao resides in the heart but it has no form (xing) but gives life.

 

Key line seems:
心 靜 氣 理 When the heart/mind is still and Qi is regulated,
道 乃 可 止 Dao can then stay there.
修 心 靜 意 But when you cultivate your heart/mind and still your thoughts,
道 乃 可 得 Dao can then be attained.
所 以 修 心 而 正 形 也 It is the reason that we cultivate the heart/mind and properly align [its] form!
所 得 以 成 也 That which when attained, thus they are completed!


Section 4: The Sage

Alignment, Xin, Jing, Qi, Dao


能 正 能 靜 When you can be properly aligned and can be still –
然 後 能 定 Then, you can be settled.
定 心 在 中 With a settled heart/mind in your center,
可 以 為 精 舍 You are able to become a dwelling for essence.
精 也 者 This essence –
氣 之 精 者 也 Is essence of Qi!
氣 道 乃 生 With Qi and Dao, then there is life;

So, an introduction to 'alignment' which seems some importance to come:


Section 5: The One

Xin, Qi, Oneness, Regulation, Spirit

 

Dao (and Jing's role) gives life and here we are told:


凡 心 之 形 Always : if the form of the heart/mind

過 知 失 生 Has too much understanding, life is lost.

 

This section seems more a moral or political instruction on oneness and regulating life and people. 

Interesting that this section uses 君子 (noble man) against early section use of 聖人 (wise man).   This may reflect the idea that the text is written over time by different views as the form is a Confucian term and the latter a daoist term.

 

note:

一 物 能 化 Knowing the Oneness with creatures can transform them,
謂 之 神 We call this being spirit-like .
一 事 能 變 Knowing the Oneness with your duties can change them,
謂 之 智 We call this being wise.

得 一 之 理 When he attains the regulation of Oneness :
治 心 在 於 中 A regulated heart/mind resides in his center,


Section 6: The Inner Grasp

Alignment, Form [Xin?], De, Center, Spirit
 
Noted Lines:
形 不 正 If the form [of the heart/mind] is not properly aligned,
德 不 來 De will not arrive.
中 不 靜 If the center is not still,
心 不 治 The heart/mind will not be regulated.
正 形 攝 德 When the properly aligned form takes in De,
天 仁 地 義 The kindness* of heaven and the righteousness of earth
中 義 守 不 忒 Maintain the righteousness* of the center, and you will not err :
不 以 官 亂 心 Do not allow the senses to confuse your heart/mind.
是 謂 中 得 This is called attaining the center.

 

Repeats how to keep the heart calm while De is brought back.  Regulation and Center seems core to how Roth begins to understand this as a method.

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On 6/3/2019 at 6:23 AM, dawei said:

Yueya ~

Align your body and assist inner power—
Then it will gradually arrive on its own.

 

Hi dawei,

 

Just feel it.

 

On 6/3/2019 at 6:23 AM, dawei said:

Yueya ~

The numinous [heart-mind], no one knows its limits;
Its luminosity extends to know the ten thousand things.
Guard it at the centre and do not let it waver.
Do not disturb your senses with external things.
Do not disturb your heart-mind with the senses.
This is called “attaining the Centre.”

 

The Centre is the VOID?

 

- Anand

 

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On 6/10/2019 at 5:48 PM, Limahong said:

 

Hi dawei,

 

Just feel it.

 

 

The Centre is the VOID?

 

- Anand

 

 

Centre is center of being.  When one accepts, Form = Void, then we may think on that.  But that is not the text we are discussing.  Please, stick to the text as you understand it. 

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@dawei, you said at some point recently (and seem to have deleted it cos I couldn't find it?) that it seems as if qi precedes jing sometimes in the text. I find this concept is repeated here, "Qi may be converted into jing" as part of the explanation of the term "Yangshen." Do you think this is the same line of thinking as found in the Neiye? 

 

 

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9 hours ago, dawei said:

Centre is center of being. When one accepts, Form = Void, then we may think on that.

 

Hi dawei,

 

Form was not a word on my mind ~ only centre.

 

- Anand

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11 hours ago, Bindi said:

@dawei, you said at some point recently (and seem to have deleted it cos I couldn't find it?) that it seems as if qi precedes jing sometimes in the text. I find this concept is repeated here, "Qi may be converted into jing" as part of the explanation of the term "Yangshen." Do you think this is the same line of thinking as found in the Neiye? 

 

 

 

I'm still trying to organize my thought on how this work treats Qi vs Jing.  I think showing them in a line or as preceding or following is not quite right.  I'm not even sure the text supports they get converted between each other.  I would be ok in calling them (along with Shen) something like 'three treasures' but I don't think I see they convert / transform one to the other; more like they are independently having a role. Yet there is a relationship at times: Jing is the Jing of Qi.  And all three can come and go.

 

I think what Linnell say's here is worth considering:

 

It seems that the Nei Ye may be saying that Dao, De, Qi, and essence are all-pervasive spiritual things (as opposed to concepts) which are not inherently within us, but which can be obtained by taking (and keeping) certain mental/emotional attitudes. However, it is also possible that the Nei Ye is using these terms to attempt to explain by allegory and metaphor the various feelings experienced as a result of the meditative practices of the writer(s). According to LaFargue, this interpretation is supported by the inconsistent “definitions” given of the various terms (and the relationships between them), and by the sometimes experientially similar descriptions of different terms. The readers can decide for themselves.

 

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1 hour ago, dawei said:

I'm still trying to organize my thought on how this work treats Qi vs Jing.  I think showing them in a line or as preceding or following is not quite right.

 

Hi dawei,

 

Into a moment (or any moment ) when I can feel both my 精 and 氣 ~ I will not split my hair thus...

(a) "Qi vs Jing

(b) "... showing them in a line or as preceding or following..."

 

Per a moment ~ "hyphen" works for me as both my 精-氣 are well in me all the time. I feel good.

 

- Anand

 

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On 6/9/2019 at 10:45 PM, dawei said:

I reviewed all 6 sections together and here is what I get:

 

Summary of key terms:

1: Jing, Qi, De
2: Form, Xin, De
3: Xin, Qi, Dao, Alignment, Form,
4: Alignment, Xin, Jing, Qi, Dao
5: Xin, Qi, Oneness, Regulation, Center, Spirit
6: Alignment, Form [Xin?], De, Center, Spirit

 

I reviewed the 6 chapters again and made some changes to my post above.

 

Here seems the use of terms in 6 chapters as what I think is making a point:

Xin = 4/5

Qi = 4

De = 3

Alignment = 3

Jing = 2

Form = 2

Dao = 2

Center = 2

Spirit = 2

Oneness = 1

Regulation = 1

 

The use of the word for align(正) seems to be why Roth takes such a strong stance that this is explaining an actual practice... but nobody is really commenting on seeing this ?

 

Roth wrote in Psychology and Self-Cultivation in early Taoist Thought:

 

Linnell: 所 以 修 心 而 正 形 也 It is the reason that we cultivate the heart/mind and properly align [its]  form!

Roth:  It is that with which we cultivate the mind and align the body.

 

Quote

The term

cheng-hsing 正 形, which could be translated as "correcting the body," has a specific meaning in the texts concerned with inner cultivation. Since the human organism is imbued with vital energy, I take cheng-hsing to refer to aligning or harmonizing the flow of vital energy within the physical form, (a more literal rendering of hsing). Likewise, the term cheng-hsin 正 心, translated below in a passage found at 16.2b9, means to align the flow of vital energy within the mind [Xin-added].

 

He also makes this statement:

Quote

It is closely linked with the Power (te), which in Taoistic thought represents the potency that arises in an organism from the concrete manifestation of the Tao within it and yet cannot be secured by any kind of intentional effort.  The text then discusses how the mind is naturally filled with the vital essence and naturally tends to generate and develop it. Yet the mind inevitably loses this essence, due to emotions, desires, and selfishness. But if the mind can discard such disturbances, it will follow its natural tendency towards equanimity and harmony.  Next the Tao is described as that ineffable and constantly moving force responsible for the vital essence filling the mind. This essence comes and goes with the Tao and is just as mysterious. Yet if we abandon the attempt to hold onto it and just still the mind (hsin ching) and guide the vital energy through breath control, this Tao can be secured. With this groundwork in place, the text then discusses the theory and practice of self-cultivation and the benefits obtained therefrom. These practices are based on stabilizing the mind:

 

Some separate comments pulled together:

Quote

- an important link between mental stability and the vital essence [Jing]. The state of tranquility creates the conditions for lodging or accumulating the vital essence within the mind and is thus intimately associated with this essence.

- we see the Tao (and the vital essence) conceived of as constantly moving into and out of the human mind [Xin].

- I interpret them as metaphorical references to one's experience of the Tao. That is, for example, when the mind is still, it seems as if the Tao is present, and when the mind is agitated, it seems as if the Tao has departed. Also the Tao is so intimately associated with the vital essence  that in this and other passages identical metaphors are used to describe them. The mental tranquility needed to stabilize the Tao is attained by casting aside all emotions, desires, and deliberate attempts to force it under one's control. With the Tao grounded in one's mind, the vital essence [Jing] is also lodged therein, and health and well-being develop.

- The vital essence [Jing] is thus seen as the source of the vital energy within the organism, and its free circulation is associated metaphorically with a higher level of comprehension of the entire cosmos.

- This passage is important for establishing a link between the numinous [Shen] state within, which is viewed as a concentrated form of vital energy [Qi] , and the vital essence [Jing], which somehow confers on the numinous the ability to foreknow. This type of metaphysical knowledge is a defining characteristic of the numinous state and differentiates it from the vital essence, which is responsible for this knowledge but does not of itself know.

- The attainment of the numinous [Shen] metaphysical knowledge is thus associated with the stabilizing of the vital essence [Jing] through the stilling of thought and the cessation of all efforts to control this essence. This process is metaphorically described as "cleaning out the lodging place of the numinous," that is, the mind [Xin].

- The regularized practice... is a method of meditation for calming the mind and reaching the Tao inherent within. To my knowledge this passage contains the earliest reference to the practice of breath-control meditation in the Chinese tradition.

 

Kirkland states:

Quote

According to the Nei Yeh, the practitioner must align his/her biospiritual nexus with the unseen forces of the world in order to attract "spirit" and receive it into one's quietened "heart/mind."  One's ability to succeed in this endeavor is called te. Te has often been dubbed a key concept in "philosophical Taoism," but the meaning of the term in the Nei Yeh hardly resembles any of the common descriptions of the term as it is used in the more familiar Taoist texts.14 In the Nei Yeh, the term te does retain the generic meaning of "the inner moral power of an individual," and even the archaic (Shang-dynasty) concept of te as "a proper disposition toward the unseen forces."  


But here, te is clearly not a force that is intrinsic to our natures, as many modern descriptions of Te in "philosophical Taoism" would have us believe. Rather, te, like "spirit," is something that we acquire when all elements of the body/heart/mind are completely peaceful and properly aligned. Here we can discern the full meaning of the traditional Chinese explanation that the word te meaning "inner power" may be understood in terms of the homophone te which is the common verb in both classical and modern Chinese for getting or acquiring. In the Nei Yeh, te may be termed "the acquisitional agency," for it is not just what we attract and receive, but that whereby we attract and receive the higher forces of life (e.g., ch'i and shen). What is more, in the Nei Yeh one is told that one's te is something that one must work on each and every day. (Once again, such teachings vary widely from the concept of what Te means in common notions of philosophical Taoism.") The practitioner builds up his/her te by practicing daily self-control over his/her thought, emotion, and action. One who succeeds at these practices can become a sheng-jen, a "sage." The "sage" is described as being "full of spirit" and "complete in heart/mind and in body."

 

My own position is not that I am saying I agree with the idea that the Neiye is a practice method or manual, but it has been written widely as just that.   I'm still not that sure it is a structured explanation on how to perform such a practice but there are clearly suggestions to calming the heart and thoughts. 

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, dawei said:

 

I reviewed the 6 chapters again and made some changes to my post above.

 

Here seems the use of terms in 6 chapters as what I think is making a point:

Xin = 4/5

Qi = 4

De = 3

Alignment = 3

Jing = 2

Form = 2

Dao = 2

Center = 2

Spirit = 2

Oneness = 1

Regulation = 1

 

The use of the word for align(正) seems to be why Roth takes such a strong stance that this is explaining an actual practice... but nobody is really commenting on seeing this ?

 

Roth wrote in Psychology and Self-Cultivation in early Taoist Thought:

 

Linnell: 所 以 修 心 而 正 形 也 It is the reason that we cultivate the heart/mind and properly align [its]  form!

Roth:  It is that with which we cultivate the mind and align the body.

 

The term

cheng-hsing 正 形, which could be translated as "correcting the body," has a specific meaning in the texts concerned with inner cultivation. Since the human organism is imbued with vital energy, I take cheng-hsing to refer to aligning or harmonizing the flow of vital energy within the physical form, (a more literal rendering of hsing). Likewise, the term cheng-hsin 正 心, translated below in a passage found at 16.2b9, means to align the flow of vital energy within the mind [Xin-added].

 

I like 'correcting' the vital (though subtle) energy flow within the body, and if referring to jing, qi and shen, then synchronising them as they increase and their flow becomes unimpeded. 

 

Later in the text

 

內 藏 以 為 泉 原 It collects inside you, thus acting as a primal spring. 浩 然 和 平 Like a vast lake, it is harmonious and equable

 

seems to denote the unimpeded quality of jing and qi, while 

 

是 謂 雲 氣 This is called cloud-like Qi – 意 行 似 天 Your intent and behavior resemble that of heaven

 

is more likely to refer to shen. 

 

Quote

 

He also makes this statement:

 

Some separate comments pulled together:

 

Kirkland states:

 

My own position is not that I am saying I agree with the idea that the Neiye is a practice method or manual, but it has been written widely as just that.   I'm still not that sure it is a structured explanation on how to perform such a practice but there are clearly suggestions to calming the heart and thoughts. 

 

Later on there seem to be instructions to contemplate a lot as well. Clear the heart, and contemplate (essence) with a quiet mind perhaps. 

 

For example 精 想 思 之 This essence – consider it and contemplate it, 寧 念 治 之 Rather than study ways to regulate it.

 

思 之 思 之 又 重 思 之 Contemplate it, contemplate it, and again repeatedly contemplate it.

 

 

Edited by Bindi
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1 hour ago, Bindi said:

 

The term

cheng-hsing 正 形, which could be translated as "correcting the body," has a specific meaning in the texts concerned with inner cultivation. Since the human organism is imbued with vital energy, I take cheng-hsing to refer to aligning or harmonizing the flow of vital energy within the physical form, (a more literal rendering of hsing). Likewise, the term cheng-hsin 正 心, translated below in a passage found at 16.2b9, means to align the flow of vital energy within the mind [Xin-added].

 

I like 'correcting' the vital (though subtle) energy flow within the body, and if referring to jing, qi and shen, then synchronising them as they increase and their flow becomes unimpeded. 

 

Yes, I like that too :)

 

 

Quote

Later in the text

 

內 藏 以 為 泉 原 It collects inside you, thus acting as a primal spring. 浩 然 和 平 Like a vast lake, it is harmonious and equable

 

seems to denote the unimpeded quality of jing and qi, while 

 

[Eno 9: Roth 15]:  And the next line is related:  

 

以 為 氣 淵 It thus becomes a fountainhead of Qi.

 

 

36 minutes ago, Bindi said:

是 謂 雲 氣 This is called cloud-like Qi – 意 行 似 天 Your intent and behavior resemble that of heaven

 

is more likely to refer to shen. 

wAAACH5BAEKAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAICRAEAOw==

 

 

[Eno 17: Roth 24]:   I was hesitant to consider Shen as usually in Neiye, Oneness is mentioned... so looking at the section, it is mentioned:


大 心 而 放 When you expand your heart/mind and free it,
寬 氣 而 廣 When your Qi is magnanimous and vast,
其 形 安 而 不 移 When your form is calm and unchanging :
能 守 一 而 棄 萬 苟 You can maintain Oneness {G} and reject the ten thousand trivialities,
見 利 不 誘 You see profit and are not tempted,
見 害 不 懼 You see trouble and are not frightened.
寬 舒 而 仁 You are magnanimous, relaxed, and kind*;
獨 樂 其 身 When alone, you are happy with your self.
是 謂 雲 氣 This is called cloud-like Qi –
意 行 似 天 Your intent and behavior resemble that of heaven.

 

守 一, here, is 抱一 in Laozi ch. 10, 22.  It is a later known practice. 


Also consider... Roth's Seventeen

 

1. For all [to practice] this Way:
2. You must coil, you must contract,
3. You must uncoil, you must expand,
4. You must be firm, you must be regular [in this practice].
5. Hold fast to this excellent [practice]; do not let go of it.
6. Chase away the excessive; abandon the trivial.
7. And when you reach its ultimate limit
8. You will return to the Way and the inner power.

 

I mentioned in the intro that this is a direct comparison to the Jade Pendant: 

https://www.thedaobums.com/topic/49163-neiye-introduction-multi-authors/?do=findComment&comment=883948


To circulate Qi;
Deepen then store,
Store then extend;
Extend then descend,
Descend then settle;
Settle then stable,
Stable then sprout;
Sprout then grow,
Grow then retreat;
Retreat then (return to) the Heavens.
The secret of the Heavens is above.
The secret of Earth is below.
Follow (this principle) then (you will) live (a long life),
Go against (this principle) then (you will) die (as a normal person).
 

 

 

36 minutes ago, Bindi said:

Later in the text

 

內 藏 以 為 泉 原 It collects inside you, thus acting as a primal spring. 浩 然 和 平 Like a vast lake, it is harmonious and equable

 

seems to denote the unimpeded quality of jing and qi, while 

wAAACH5BAEKAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAICRAEAOw==

 

[Eno 7: Roth 13]

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7 hours ago, dawei said:

 

Yes, I like that too :)

 

 

 

[Eno 9: Roth 15]:  And the next line is related:  

 

以 為 氣 淵 It thus becomes a fountainhead of Qi.

 

 

wAAACH5BAEKAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAICRAEAOw==

 

 

[Eno 17: Roth 24]:   I was hesitant to consider Shen as usually in Neiye, Oneness is mentioned... so looking at the section, it is mentioned:

 

 

What does 'Oneness' refer to? 

 

7 hours ago, dawei said:

 


大 心 而 放 When you expand your heart/mind and free it,
寬 氣 而 廣 When your Qi is magnanimous and vast,
其 形 安 而 不 移 When your form is calm and unchanging :
能 守 一 而 棄 萬 苟 You can maintain Oneness {G} and reject the ten thousand trivialities,
見 利 不 誘 You see profit and are not tempted,
見 害 不 懼 You see trouble and are not frightened.
寬 舒 而 仁 You are magnanimous, relaxed, and kind*;
獨 樂 其 身 When alone, you are happy with your self.
是 謂 雲 氣 This is called cloud-like Qi –
意 行 似 天 Your intent and behavior resemble that of heaven.

 

守 一, here, is 抱一 in Laozi ch. 10, 22.  It is a later known practice. 


Also consider... Roth's Seventeen

 

1. For all [to practice] this Way:
2. You must coil, you must contract,
3. You must uncoil, you must expand,
4. You must be firm, you must be regular [in this practice].
5. Hold fast to this excellent [practice]; do not let go of it.
6. Chase away the excessive; abandon the trivial.
7. And when you reach its ultimate limit
8. You will return to the Way and the inner power.

 

I mentioned in the intro that this is a direct comparison to the Jade Pendant: 

https://www.thedaobums.com/topic/49163-neiye-introduction-multi-authors/?do=findComment&comment=883948


To circulate Qi;
Deepen then store,
Store then extend;
Extend then descend,
Descend then settle;
Settle then stable,
Stable then sprout;
Sprout then grow,
Grow then retreat;
Retreat then (return to) the Heavens.
The secret of the Heavens is above.
The secret of Earth is below.
Follow (this principle) then (you will) live (a long life),
Go against (this principle) then (you will) die (as a normal person).
 

 

 

wAAACH5BAEKAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAICRAEAOw==

 

[Eno 7: Roth 13]

 

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8 hours ago, Bindi said:

 

What does 'Oneness' refer to? 

 

IMO, it either refers to a type of wholeness/completeness [of having gathered the necessary parts; Jing, Qi, Shen, Dao, De]  (Reid calls it unification) or a generalized nod to Dao [as Oneness].   

 

In LZ, we see to: hold to Dao, grasp the great image, The Sage embraces the One.

 

Eno section 5 seems a good reference:

 

Quote

Section 5: The One
 
Eno

 If the form of the heart
acquires excessive knowledge, life is lost.
Unifying with things and able to transform them –
this is called spirit-like.
Unifying with affairs and able to adapt –
this is called wisdom.
To transform without altering one’s qi,
and adapt without altering one’s wisdom –

 only a junzi who grips the One can do this.
Gripping the One without fail,
he is able to be ruler to the world of things.

The junzi manipulates things; he is not manipulated by things.
He grasps the principle of the One,
a regulated heart at his center,
regulated words come forth from his mouth,
he engages others in regulated affairs,
and thus the world is regulated.
In one phrase he grasps it and the world submits;
in one phrase he sets it and the world obeys –
this is called impartiality.

 

 

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6 hours ago, Bindi said:

What does 'Oneness' refer to?

 

Hi Bindi,

 

I can feel 'Oneness' when my yin-yang elements, dimensions, polarities... are completely, sexually, blissfully... united, unionized, joined... as a whole, unity, embrace... without division, arguments, hair splitting...

 

- Anand

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On 6/12/2019 at 9:03 PM, Bindi said:

是 謂 雲 氣 This is called cloud-like Qi – 意 行 似 天 Your intent and behavior resemble that of heaven

 

is more likely to refer to shen. 

 

This 'cloud-like Qi' seems a very unusual phrase.  I can't find an example of it outside of a nature point of view (clouds). 

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On 6/12/2019 at 9:03 PM, Bindi said:

The term

cheng-hsing 正 形, which could be translated as "correcting the body," has a specific meaning in the texts concerned with inner cultivation. Since the human organism is imbued with vital energy, I take cheng-hsing to refer to aligning or harmonizing the flow of vital energy within the physical form, (a more literal rendering of hsing). Likewise, the term cheng-hsin 正 心, translated below in a passage found at 16.2b9, means to align the flow of vital energy within the mind [Xin-added].

 

Just after this note is:

 

Quote

The notion of aligning the five systems of ch 'i within the human microcosm clearly parallels the notion of aligning the human realm in toto with the realm of nature that Schwartz argues is the ultimate result of the philosophy and technology of the Yin-yang/Five Phase cosmologists (Schwartz, pp. 350-69).  The common element here is that through intentional activity human beings can put themselves in harmony with the inherent natural guidelines (li) of the cosmos.

 

I swear I've seen the list of aligning the five systems somewhere... if anyone knows it, please share.  

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19 hours ago, dawei said:

 

This 'cloud-like Qi' seems a very unusual phrase.  I can't find an example of it outside of a nature point of view (clouds). 

i was confused about that phrase but then found out that 谓云 means 'to say or to call". so its likely it just means 'it is called qi'

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