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GrandTrinity

Stern Yogis

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I am finding myself at my college and having to deal with an adviser who oversees many consiousness studies students.

 

For myself, consiousness is more body and heart centered as opposed to mental: The three brains.

 

Now this yogi is real stern and I need some advice in dealing with him. The whole emptied cup aspect of Zen (full cup cannot be filled) is interesting.

 

Please help.

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Hmnn, maybe 4 choices. Surrender to him, Fight (or ignore) what he says, or Find a compromise if possible.

 

Strict is not neccessarily bad. If he's a good man, consider surrendering. If you choose this path, then do it totally.

 

You'll have to come up with your own fourth choice.

 

 

Michael

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Hey GT!

 

Glad to offer any insights that may come to me but need a bit more info... Are you saying that he is inflexible to your perspectives? is he bullying you? or is this more a thing that has to do with being academic vs. being spiritual? I guess I am asking you to elaborate more...

 

Later,

 

Matt

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You can walk away.

 

You can hang around and try the yogi's practices but only keep what works safely and discard the rest. Before you try one of the yogi's practices, you may have to do an internet search to find out if it is inherently safe. If a particular mudra, chant, or position doesn't work for you for a specific objective, look on the internet and find one that works and submit that as part of your work. You may end up making the yogi's course better and more effective for students that study in the next class.

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Don't know about the yogi but this leads me to interesting thoughts about consciousness. I've been thinking about, reading about and discussing these things a lot lately.

So in reference to your Original post GT:

Does consciousness have a center?

If you investigate your own consciousness, for example, is there a center? Sure, maybe your Central Nervous System is an electrochemical or material aspect of it, and maybe there is some sort of Chi aspect as well, but what about the aspect that has no material manifestation?

Its funny. We can't truly define, grasp, conceive or locate our consciousness itself and yet everything we create or do emerges from, "it".

If you trace an action backwards through the physical manifestation of the action, through the brain transmitting the "move body now" signal, back through the decision to act, through the emergence of the intent to act, through to the very matrix that the thought emerged in, what do you have?

 

Well, for me it seems to be a very fertile nothing. Is there an identity there? No. Is there a personality there? Mmmm..nope. The personality comes after the consciousness engages with the environment. So what is there when you trace an action all the way back home? Just some sort of immaterial field that gives birth to ideas, intentions and actions via a nervous system that interacts with the congealed stardust of this material universe. Beyond that? Who knows?

But with that immaterial field, there is no binary concept. There is no either/or.

This suggests that two people with seemingly opposite viewpoints could both be correct about consciousness.

It also suggests that you don't have to place judgement on the situation or charge it with any particular value.

If you look at the thought process that you are applying to the situation then you can pretty much view it however you want to. If only I could see it that way every minute of every day....

 

Of course I am just kinda pooping all this out and hucking it in the direction of what ultimately probably can't be understood by discussion or dissection. Hopefully I am making sense to someone besides myself.

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I am finding myself at my college and having to deal with an adviser who oversees many consiousness studies students.

 

For myself, consiousness is more body and heart centered as opposed to mental: The three brains.

 

Now this yogi is real stern and I need some advice in dealing with him. The whole emptied cup aspect of Zen (full cup cannot be filled) is interesting.

 

Please help.

 

Consciousness Studies? In such a case it is not surprising that the yogi is stern. Many students attracted to such programs are already suffering to some degree from New Agism, which must be nipped in the bud if the students are to have any luck in advancement.

 

Sloppy multiculturalism and a glorification of mysticism must sometimes be corrected in the Zen manner, with a board to the head. :) Before one can understand the true connectedness of all things, one must have an understanding of the things themselves. :) Before one can level out boundaries and distinctions, one must first understand their reasons, shape, and form. Cups are sometimes filled with the illusion of emptiness. :)

 

That is not to say that the heart should be closed off from practice. Ridgidly going through the motions of technique without grasping their spirit is no better. My advice would be to listen to what he says with an open mind, and to do one's best to replace ""more body and heart centered as opposed to mental" with "equally centered. with more time spent on those things that I am weakest in".

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