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terry

taoism and sufism

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10 hours ago, damdao said:

Do you include Shah's writtings under others pennames like Arkon Daraul, Rafael Lefort, Omar Burke, Laura (I don't remeber the last name, it was about secret societies).... and the anonymous study material of his groups? 

I like the classics the way of the sufi, tales from the dervishes, knowing how to learn, knowing how to know, etc.

I found, though, a little distubing his earlier books and translations on magick and wicca.

 

   I read his novel about afghanistan. The sufis books and some of the study material. No I am not a devotee. I didn't find his actual lectures all that inspiring. He was a collector of study materials and a promoter. And he had a sense of humor.

 

   

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10 hours ago, Zhongyongdaoist said:

 

I am in complete disagreement with the notion that "Daoism is a religion"

 

what elements would qualify a religion in your opinion?

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9 hours ago, Zhongyongdaoist said:

I need to preface this post by saying that I am a very busy person and can't see spending the time needed to make long contributions to this topic at this time.  I have spent sometime since its appearance thinking about it, reviewing some aspects of previous research and wondering how I might be able to contribute to it.  Here is the first thing that I wanted to add:

 

 

Since this is the "classic" in the field, then this link to a downloadable PdF would seem to be in order:


Toshihiko Izutsu Sufism And Taoism

 

I have not had time to read all of this, though i do have some ideas about its proper use and potential abuse, but i will have to do more reading to see if my first impressions are accurate.

 

As for this:

 

 

I am in complete disagreement with the notion that "Daoism is a religion".  As far as I am concerned as a practitioner of what is usually referred to as "Relitigous Daoism", that it is a complete misnomer to call it such foisted on it by Western scholars of "religions", that it would be more properly referred ti as "Ritual Daoism" and its structure would be better modeled by something like Freemasonry.  Basically Ritual Daosim was developed by Fangshi for Fangshi, as a combination of professional guild and teaching hall and has nothing to do with the "worship" of gods in the sense of a grovelling submission to such beings motivated by threats of punishment and promises of rewards for such behavior.  It's all about learning and practicing magic, which involves a great deal of time and study as anyone who has read and studied the works of Professor Jerry Alan Johnson can amply justify.

 

This is all I have time for today, and all that I can say is that I will try to respond to any comments in a timely fashion, but I cannot guarantee that what I consider to be a timely fashion will be the same as yours.

 

As for what I might like to see here, these would be of interest to me:

 

 

Zhonyongdaoist

usually ZYD for short

 

 

   I'm looking forward to when you have the time to peruse izutsu's book. It took me a long time to read and contains many delights. The discussion of sufism explores ibn arabi's views in depth. The section on taoism is heavily deistic and points up the centrality of divinity to taoism (in contradistinction to those chinese speaking taoists who believe their culture never taught them about god).

 

   Not sure how far into filosofeh you want to go but a few broad strokes might be in order.

 

   The arabs preserved the greek classics of plato, aristotle and plotinus through the middle ages,  Al-farabi translated and wrote extensive commentaries, conforming greek ideas with muslim theology. Avicenna, ibn arabi and averroes developed philosophies based on these works. Al-ghazali criticized the aristotelians for unbelief and averroes responded to the criticism. Since the works themselves predated islam, one may say that sufism has its roots in greek philosophy and in particular the neo-platonism of plotinus, whose theory of emanations featured largely in al-farabi's work and deeply influenced sufis like ibn arabi.

 

   Avicenna extended al-farabi's work on aristotelianism (platonism was often conflated). Aristotle was concerned with being qua being in ways that were understood by the early muslim philosophers but then buried and forgotten by the western scholastics who superseded them. The west only rediscovered the depth of aristotle's vision with brentano-husserl-heidegger and phenomenology.

 

   There was a high water mark in arabic philsophy around the time of averroes. Averroism believed that there was a universal intellect that all humans participated in, a very neo-platonist idea and reminiscent of plotinus. This was rejected by thomas aquinas and the west went a very different way, affirming the reality of the individual ego and subject object perception.

 

   In averroism the indvidual mind is a node of the one mind, like the internet is composed of individual computers. The computers share a language and basic operating system. The individual is created as such by the network, the collectivity. Without a comprehensive language essentially understood by all there would be no communication, no network, and no individuals as such. Each individual mind only exists as a feature of the network. We are all one.

 

   This hardly scratches the surface. If you have a particular interest we could open a thread about that. Ismailism? Where would we put the thread?

 

terry

 

   

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, terry said:

 

I don't agree with either of these statements. The contraries are closer to true.

 

Why?

Daoism is a traditional chinese religion, while sufism is a particularly fervent approach to spirituality in Islam.

 

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1 hour ago, Cheshire Cat said:

 

Why?

Daoism is a traditional chinese religion, while sufism is a particularly fervent approach to spirituality in Islam.

 

 

 

   Daoists don't worship god and sufis do.

 

 

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12 hours ago, Zhongyongdaoist said:

 

 

 

Since this is the "classic" in the field, then this link to a downloadable PdF would seem to be in order:


Toshihiko Izutsu Sufism And Taoism

 

 

Thanks for posting this.

 

   Not just a classic,  bra, a landmark that stands alone.

 

I'd love to find another like it. Perhaps something new? With 8 billion humans someone should know something. A thesis perhaps.

 

 

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47 minutes ago, terry said:

 

 

   Daoists don't worship god and sufis do.

 

 

 

from the tao te ching:

 

The nameless is the beginning of heaven and earth.
The named is the mother of the ten thousand things.

 

 

from the quran

 

In the Name of God, the Compassionate, the Merciful

 

 

   The declaration of faith, "there is no god but god" is senseless to a taoist. The tao, the void, nirvana are all negative theology, which is also important to filosofeh. Also to sufism in the abstract but sufism is a religion of the heart, a religion of love and sufis are happy to worship god and abnegate self. Enthusiastically, ecstatically, actively.

 

   Taoism is a correction to the masculinity and activity of confucianism, itself also not a religion of divine worship (nor is buddhism). Taoism is a yin response to the overactivity of the well meaning souls who pave the road to hell with their intentions. Worshipping the masculine god (aka "emperor of heaven") and of course his representatives on earth is subverted by taoism, though they share with confucians a touching belief in the goodness of humanity.

 

   Religion west and east has been distorted by being deliberately created and deployed by empires. Empires love the divine right of rule. Both sufism and taoism were subversive influences, preserving truth from coerced convention. The leaven in the bread of their respective cultures.

 

   Power is itself a lie. God alone is great, or greatness has no meaning. Those who seek and attempt to use power depend on lies, and lies depend on truth, or there would be nothing to lie about. Truth, on the other hand, does not depend on lies. Truth does not depend on the world of generation and corruption, the world of birth and death. Creating a martyr only underscores truth. 

 

   Sufis love martyrdom. Islam creates martyrs.Taoists avoid praise and blame equally. Confucians want to be free of blame. These are mutual dependencies.

 

   Taoists and sufis raise a glass to their sober brethren and invite them to lighten up.

 

   

 

 

 

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this quote about a sufi poet might resonate with daoists

 

 


Excerpt From: Haleh Pourafzal. ‚ÄúHaf√©z.‚ÄĚ

 


Were we to paraphrase Haféz in English, the condensed wisdom of the poet’s writings would read something like this:

 

   If you yearn for inner peace and want to know love, if you wish to be a spiritual seeker like me, you can search for your personal treasure through ecstatic intoxication.

 

   I give you my thoughts at the entrance to this tavern of intoxication. Taste them as a first sip of spiritual wine.

 

   This pathway to inner peace is at odds with two deadly enemies: hypocrisy and profanity. Hypocrisy is the way of established order as it seeks to protect and prolong itself at all costs. Profanity is the mindless waste of those who react destructively to established order.

 

   At the same time, ecstasy demands that you seek ultimate pleasure. But be aware. If the pleasure embodies either hypocrisy or profanity, you will be at war with yourself.

 

   The weapons for this war and the openings to this pleasure are all within you. You must find them in your intoxication and then use them in the material world. Such application requires constant attunement with your inner core, acting on direct instinct, and deep laughter that unties the knots of emotion.

 

   If you are truly journeying to love, your final goal must be only one thing: perceiving and expressing truth.

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4 hours ago, Cheshire Cat said:

what elements would qualify a religion in your opinion?

 

2 hours ago, terry said:
14 hours ago, Zhongyongdaoist said:

 

 

Since this is the "classic" in the field, then this link to a downloadable PdF would seem to be in order:


Toshihiko Izutsu Sufism And Taoism

 

 

Thanks for posting this.

 

You're Welcome.

 

Thank you both for you posts.  This weekend and through midweek will be very busy for me  and i will not be able to give much serious thought to the issues raised much less organize a response until later in the week or next weekend.  I have managed to squeeze in Izutxu's preface, which clarified the background of the book in a very useful way.

 

ZYD

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11 hours ago, terry said:

 

 

   Daoists don't worship god and sufis do.

 

 

 

A religion doesn't need to be monotheistic to qualify as a religion.

... and sufis worship God because they're muslim and not because they're dervishes. Although they are rare, there are sufi orders in which it's not mandatory to be muslim (for example,  Azeemia).

 

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the following poem and commentary from: Haleh Pourafzal. ‚ÄúHaf√©z.‚ÄĚ

 


IN NEITHER OCEAN

 

Go away preacher‚ÄĒWhat‚Äôs all this commotion?
It’s my heart hurting and you have no notion.

 

My human balance God crafted from air is
a point so fine it’s erased by emotion.

 

‚ÄėTil beloved‚Äôs lips satisfy my desire,
the whole world’s advice is babble in motion.

 

Your servant cannot travel two paths at once;
the prey in your net swims in neither ocean.

 

Though intoxication has shattered my life,
the seeds of truth arise from that implosion.

 

O heart, don’t groan from beloved’s cruelty,
for now you know the sad song of devotion.

 

Haféz, don’t weave tales, don’t entice seduction;
I know all the spins and spells of your potion.

 

 

In these seven verses, Haf√©z tells a story set in his unique worldview: a noisy preacher who has no clue, a fragile peace of mind blown away by emotion, obsession with the beloved at the expense of blocking out common sense, the inability to choose between the paths leading to the sacred and profane worlds, a new truth emerging from a shattered dream, a lesson learned from direct experience, and, finally, the biluminous teasing of the poet himself for all his ‚Äúspins and spells‚ÄĚ of levels and meanings. The shattered nature of life from the implosion of intoxication is an oft-repeated theme. This shattering is the disintegration that occurs when we embody the brightness of the divine. Because it is overwhelming compared with our limited experiences, the shattering in turn magnifies the desire for more sustained direct experiences of divine unity. That desire becomes the mystic‚Äôs lifelong quest.

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